National Council for Reconciliation

Learn how the Government of Canada is responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action 53 to 56.

53. We call upon the Parliament of Canada, in consultation and collaboration with Aboriginal Peoples, to enact legislation to establish a National Council for Reconciliation.

The legislation would establish the council as an independent, national, oversight body with membership jointly appointed by the Government of Canada and national Aboriginal organizations, and consisting of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal members.

Its mandate would include, but not be limited to, the following:

  1. Monitor, evaluate, and report annually to Parliament and the people of Canada on the Government of Canada's post-apology progress on reconciliation to ensure that government accountability for reconciling the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown is maintained in the coming years.
  2. Monitor, evaluate, and report to Parliament and the people of Canada on reconciliation progress across all levels and sectors of Canadian society, including the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's Calls to Action.
  3. Develop and implement a multi-year National Action Plan for Reconciliation, which includes research and policy development, public education programs, and resources.
  4. Promote public dialogue, public/private partnerships, and public initiatives for reconciliation.

What's happening?

In December 2017, the Government of Canada announced the creation of an interim board of Indigenous leaders to provide  advise on options for the creation of the National Council for Reconciliation and define the scope and scale of the mandate of the council.

In June 2018, the Interim Board of Directors presented its final report, which provides advice and recommendations on the National Council for Reconciliation and the related endowment fund.

The Government of Canada is committed to establishing the National Council of Reconciliation and will take into consideration the advice and recommendations provided in the final report during the decision making process.

In addition, Budget 2019 announced $126.5 million in fiscal year 2020 to 2021 to establish a National Council for Reconciliation and endow it with initial operating capital.

54. We call upon the Government of Canada to provide multi-year funding for the National Council for Reconciliation to ensure that it has the financial, human, and technical resources required to conduct its work, including the endowment of a National Reconciliation Trust to advance the cause of reconciliation.

What's happening?

In December 2017, the Government of Canada announced the creation of an interim board of Indigenous leaders to provide advice on options for the creation of the National Council for Reconciliation and define the scope and scale of the mandate of the council.

The Government of Canada is committed to establishing the National Council of Reconciliation and will take into consideration the advice and recommendations provided in the final report during the decision making process.

In addition, Budget 2019 announced $126.5 million in fiscal year 2020 to 2021 to establish a National Council for Reconciliation and endow it with initial operating capital.

55. We call upon all levels of government to provide annual reports or any current data requested by the National Council for Reconciliation so that it can report on the progress towards reconciliation. The reports or data would include, but not be limited to:

  1. The number of Aboriginal children—including Métis and Inuit children—in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, the reasons for apprehension, and the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies.
  2. Comparative funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves.
  3. The educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people.
  4. Progress on closing the gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in a number of health indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.
  5. Progress on eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal children in youth custody over the next decade.
  6. Progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization and other crimes.
  7. Progress on reducing the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the justice and correctional systems.

What's happening?

In December 2017, the Government of Canada announced the creation of an interim board of Indigenous leaders to provide advice on options for the creation of the National Council for Reconciliation and define the scope and scale of the mandate of the council.

In June 2018, the Interim Board of Directors presented its final report, which provides advice and recommendations on the National Council for Reconciliation and the related endowment fund.

In response to Call to Action 55, the interim board suggested that the national council focuses its actions on:

  • researching on reconciliation progress
  • monitoring and overseeing government programs, policies and laws that touch Indigenous peoples and reconciliation
  • reporting to Parliament and the people of Canada on existing, future and generative (decisive, instrumental and enabling) possibilities to advance reconciliation
  • advocating for and educating about reconciliation across all governments and sectors of Canadian society
  • initiating innovative dialogue, thought and action on reconciliation
  • recommending approaches on how to promote, prioritize and co-ordinate reconciliation efforts

56. We call upon the Prime Minister of Canada to formally respond to the report of the National Council for Reconciliation by issuing an annual "State of Aboriginal Peoples" report, which would outline the government's plans for advancing the cause of reconciliation.

What's happening?

The interim board recommended that a formal reporting mechanism be set up in which the National Council for Reconciliation would prepare a report on the state of reconciliation in Canada. This report would be presented to Parliament. Consistent with Call to Action 56, the Prime Minister would formally respond to the national council's report by issuing an annual State of Indigenous Peoples report, which would outline the Government of Canada's plans for advancing the cause of reconciliation.

The Government of Canada is committed to establishing the National Council of Reconciliation and will take into consideration the advice and recommendations provided in the final report during the decision making process.

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