Federal Pathway Annual Progress Report

Table of contents

Introduction

Following the release of the Calls for Justice of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls' and of the Calls for Miskotahâ in Métis Perspectives of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and LGBTQ2S+ People in 2019, the Government of Canada came together to create a plan for departments to support systemic change to end violence against Indigenous women and girls and Two-Spirit, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex and Asexual (2SLGBTQQIA+) people. The 2021 Federal Pathway to Address Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People ("Federal Pathway 2021") is the Government of Canada's contribution to the 2021 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People National Action Plan: Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People. Both the National Action Plan and the Federal Pathway were released on June 3, 2021.

The first Annual Progress Report provides an overview of initiatives that are moving forward through funding provided in the Fall Economic Statement 2020 and Budget 2021, as announced in the Federal Pathway in June 2021, including scope, timeline and which department or agency is responsible for the implementation of each initiative. It is organized in common sections and per theme, based on those elaborated in the Federal Pathway 2021: Culture, Health and Wellness, Human Safety and Security and Justice. In addition, a fifth theme was developed for the purposes of reporting on progress: Organizational Capacity and Coordination.

The first Annual Progress Report is an account of work completed between April 1, 2021 and March 31, 2022 to support transparency, communication, and accountability. It features reporting on Principles for Implementation, key highlights and updates per initiative and per theme, information on efforts to improve the quality of data, and a look ahead to 2022-23. This report also acknowledges places where the government must do more and work to accelerate these initiatives.

The Government of Canada is providing this report on progress made during the 2021-22 fiscal year, but understands that there is much work ahead to ensure that action to address violence remains a priority across government. As Indigenous partners have made clear, addressing violence means that we must all work together toward a shared vision, as presented within the National Action Plan: a transformed Canada where Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, wherever they are, live free from violence, and are celebrated, honoured, respected, valued, treated equitably, safe, and secure.

Reflecting on the Implementation Principles

The Government of Canada understands that the way work is undertaken to end violence is as important as the results of that work. To that end, federal efforts to date have also sought to change the way we do things, by embracing and honoring the Implementation Principles contained within the Federal Pathway. Some of the ways in which the Government of Canada has sought to honour these principles include:

These actions are a part of the solution to changing the way we do things, rather than just changing what we do. We continue to work to better reflect the principles in the implementation of other programs and initiatives moving forward.

Progress to Date: Culture

In 2021-22, key investments have worked toward supporting Indigenous cultures across Canada through the support of languages, cultural spaces, and Indigenous content production. Altogether, these actions supported the key thematic objectives from the Federal Pathway, including:

Key Highlights

In 2021-22:

  • The Indigenous Languages Component of the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program supported more than 410 projects from First Nations, Inuit, Métis and organizations serving urban Indigenous populations.
  • Canadian Heritage's new Indigenous Screen Office Program invested $13M in Indigenous creators and organizations.
  • The first call for proposals under the Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program (CSICP) was launched in 2021-22. Over 340 applications were received amounting to close to $1B in funding being sought. 14 projects were funded in 2021-22.
  • Library and Archives' Listen, Hear Our Voices program distributed $739,000 to support digitization of records in Indigenous organizations, and also digitized 568 recordings on behalf of several communities.
  • The Centre on Diversity and Inclusion at Treasury Board Secretariat amended the Public Service Employment Act and made efforts to address systemic barriers for Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, in addition to other equity-seeking groups, in public service staffing.
  • Through its Indigenous Learning Series, the Canada School of Public Service has delivered training to more than 93,884 participants from the public service and 36,000 public servants took part in virtual events on topics related to Indigenous realities.
  • Elk Island National Park continues to support the Buffalo Sage Wellness House, an Indigenous Healing Lodge in Edmonton, in the ongoing use of Elk Island National Park for traditional ceremonies and activities. This includes using the Cultural Use Area for full-moon ceremonies and the harvesting of traditional medicines by Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people in many areas of the Park. These measures support participants to hold ceremony and provide connection to traditional lands for sacred medicines. Being one with nature at Elk Island National Park has provided inspiration and motivation for the future.
  • Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) has trained approximately 5,000 public servants as part of their Circle of Nations training and learning program. Of note, the Circle of Nations invited Indigenous women to participate in two roundtable sessions on International Women's Day, during Mining Week, a female Indigenous author will be sharing her experiences in mining and, during International Day for Women in Mining, NRCan has secured a panel of Indigenous women who have experience in the Mining sector in Canada and internationally.

Reclaiming Power and Place through Culture

Today's announcement couldn't have been more welcomed and better timed. We have been working very hard to see the realization of a much-needed new building to house our Language and Cultural Center, Museum and Theatre. This funding gives us the boost we need to move forward with the next steps towards creating this central location for language, history and cultural activities.

Grand Chief Kahsennenhawe Sky-Deer Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke,
Recipient of funding under the Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program

The Government of Canada understands that, for many Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, access to culture remains an important part of reclaiming power and place and ultimately, of finding safety. As the Federal Pathway notes, ensuring that Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, no matter where they live, have safe, no-barrier, permanent, and meaningful access to their cultures and languages is a foundation for identity and belonging. Reconnecting with Indigenous languages, cultures, and ways of knowing not only fosters a positive identity but also contributes to healing, nation-building and the safety of Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ individuals. Initiatives implemented under the theme of culture are working to empower Indigenous people who have been forcibly disconnected from their communities, cultures, families, and ways of being to learn and pass on to the next generation.

The Indigenous Languages Act received Royal Assent in June 2019, and recognizes Indigenous languages as fundamental to the identities, cultures and spirituality of Indigenous Peoples. One of the overall objectives of the Act is to support Indigenous Peoples in their efforts to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen Indigenous languages. The Government of Canada has provided ongoing funding to support the engagement of National Indigenous Organizations in the joint implementation of the Act. In 2021-22, efforts have continued with Indigenous partners to develop and implement distinction-based Indigenous languages funding models, including providing more flexible approaches to funding, determining costing for long-term, sustainable and predictable funding, and increasing Indigenous autonomy over funding. Increased funding is supporting Indigenous women as traditional keepers of language and culture and contributing important knowledge being preserved and transmitted. Additional collaborative work related to making sure that Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are heard, in tables such as Library and Archives Canada's Indigenous Advisory Circle, and others, has also taken place.

Ensuring that languages and cultures are protected is only part of the solution – making sure that Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people can access them is equally important. As Indigenous partners have shared, Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing are embedded in the stories, the songs and the ceremonies that may take place in community, and that must be supported. In 2021-22, new programs like the Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program have worked to implement funding which will work to foster safe and secure spaces for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to preserve and to take part in cultural traditions. In addition, funding by Libraries and Archives Canada (LAC) to support the digitization of cultural heritage has looked to continue to increase access to LAC's online records of Indigenous cultural and linguistic significance, this project increased the capacity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and communities to learn their histories and revitalize their cultures. The project's goals of digitizing records of importance to Indigenous communities and making them discoverable online is twofold in that it preserves the content of these records for future generations as well as reduces the barriers associated with not having the records available online. The website provides these records on an easily accessible table and map that provides concise information to Indigenous communities researching their histories. Since 2019, 255 entries of individual collections and 592,000 images have been added to this list, and the project is growing.

Understanding one's own identity and culture are elements of safety that were shared by many family members and survivors, alongside the importance of positive images and representations of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. The Indigenous Screen Office (ISO), in 2021-22, contributed to confronting the socio-economic, geographic and technological barriers that have limited access to training and mentorship opportunities for Indigenous creators, resulting in a continuous underrepresentation of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people within the sector. Throughout 2021-22, Indigenous creators, including women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ creators, have been supported to produce audiovisual content that contributes to ending violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people through the creation of authentic stories that help educate Canadians about the history of Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

The Government of Canada also recognizes that it, too, must engage in more learning and to address systemic racism in the public and policy spheres. In 2021-22, sixteen federal departments and secretariats piloted the federal Anti-Racism Framework, a "whole-of-government resource" that can be applied across all business lines to improve existing and future policies, programs, services, legal frameworks and practices. It is anticipated that the Framework will empower public servants to advance systems change and strengthen institutional capacity to remove systemic barriers, identify gaps and generate positive outcomes for all people in Canada, including those with daily lived experience of racism. The Federal Secretariat is currently working through feedback, and in anticipation of its release, the Federal Secretariat will be collaborating with institutions like the Canada School of Public Service to begin offering seminars and training to over 7,000 federal public servants on anti-Indigenous racism, anti-Black racism, anti-Asian racism, antisemitism and soon Islamophobia.

Finally, in response to Call to Action 57 and the Calls for Justice, the Canada School of Public Service (the School), developed a range of learning products on the history, current realities and rights of Indigenous Peoples, the legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous laws, and Aboriginal Crown relations, as well as skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism. The School's online learning platform allows public servants across Canada to access training and learning content as it becomes available. Products include courses, events, videos, podcasts, learning and job aids for all levels of the public service. For example, in 2021-22, the School launched the job aid The Timeline of Influential Women, in which over 150 influential First Nations, Inuit and Métis women are profiled, recognizing the vital roles and contributions of Indigenous women to Canadian society and to Canada. In addition, a mobile application: Reconciliation – a Starting Point which was downloaded by 17,000 users. To develop these products, the School engages with Indigenous Elders, Indigenous academics, subject matter experts and Indigenous organizations to ensure the learning was developed in a respectful, distinctions-based, inclusive, meaningful and effective manner.

However, the work that has occurred throughout 2021-22 is only a beginning, with much more to come. In addition to the information provided in the tables on 2022-23, we invite you to consult the Looking Forward section for more information on new investments to support our commitment.

Federal Pathway Updates

The table below provides key updates on the status of progress for each initiative:

Initiative Update on 2021-22 Update on Engagement Calls for Justice/Calls for Miskotahâ

Investments in Indigenous Languages

Lead Department: Canadian Heritage

Funding: $275M/5 years and $2M ongoing

Description: Supporting the implementation of the Indigenous Languages Act.

Calls for Justice: 2.2ii, 2.3, 2.4, 7.5, 16.2, 16.25

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Through the Indigenous Languages Component, Canadian Heritage will provide funding to a larger number of projects submitted by Indigenous communities and governments under the 2021-2022 Call for Proposals. Canadian Heritage will also continue working with First Nations, Métis Nation and Inuit review committees to assess projects and make recommendations under the 2021-22 Call for Proposals.

Canadian Heritage will discuss with selected Indigenous participants the creation of new agreements under the Indigenous Languages Act (the Act) and will seek approval to conclude such agreements. Canadian Heritage is currently piloting two Pathfinder agreements under the Act: one is with the Nisga'a Lisims Government (from 2019-20 to 2024-25), and the second is a tripartite agreement with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (from 2021-22 to 2025-26).

Update on 2021-22

In 2021-22, funding under the Indigenous Languages Component supported more than 410 projects from First Nation, Inuit, Métis Nation and organizations serving urban Indigenous populations. A broad range of activities that contribute to the strengthening and cultural healing of communities received support. Examples include language and cultural instruction and camps, mentor-apprentice programs, the production of recordings on Indigenous activities, the production of books on storytelling, and the creation of traditional cookbooks.

In 2021-22, Canadian Heritage began funding a tripartite agreement under Sections 8 and 9 of the Indigenous Languages Act with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated and the Government of Nunavut to increase the number of fluent Inuktut speaking Inuit teachers in Nunavut. The Department also continued to support a second agreement under the Act with the Nisga'a Lisims Government to enhance resources for language learning.

The Call for Proposals for 2022-23 took place in the fall of 2021, and Canadian Heritage is working with First Nation, Inuit and Métis Nation Review Committees to assess projects and make recommendations.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Canadian Heritage will implement the 2022-23 Call for Proposals, which will continue to support Indigenous language projects under the Indigenous Languages Component and will implement any new agreements entered into under the Act.

National partners: The engagement structures for the implementation of the initiative, as part of the implementation of the Indigenous Languages Act, include:

  • a Joint Implementation Steering Committee (JISC) comprised of the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council and Canadian Heritage;
  • the Canada-Congress of Aboriginal Peoples Accord Indigenous Languages Table;
  • the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee–Inuktitut Working Group Table;
  • the Métis National Council (MNC) and its four governing members; and,
  • continued outreach to other national Indigenous organizations.

Regional and community-based partners: In addition, Canadian Heritage is also reaching out to Indigenous governments, other Indigenous governing bodies and Indigenous organizations at the regional and local levels, other federal departments and agencies, and provinces and territories in a collaborative approach to implementing the Act and the initiative. Examples include:

  • the Manitoba Métis Federation
  • the Nunavut Partnership Table on Language and Education, comprised of the Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Both the Indigenous Languages Act, and the Indigenous Language and Culture Program support Calls for Justice 2.2ii, 2.3, and 2.4 imploring all governments to invest, support and improve access to Indigenous languages and cultures. They also support Call for Justice 7.5, which asks that governments and organizations support programs, services, and initiatives in Indigenous languages, and Calls for Justice 16.2 and 16.25, which call for the protection and revitalization of Inuit culture and language.

Indigenous Screen Office (ISO)

Lead Department: Canadian Heritage

Funding: $40.1M/3 years

Description: Supporting Canadian Indigenous creators and organizations to produce audiovisual content and grow capacity in the industry through an Indigenous-led organization. Advancing Indigenous narrative sovereignty and contributing to ending violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people by supporting the creation of authentic stories by and about Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

Calls for Justice: 2.7, 6.1

Calls for Miskotahâ: 21

Planned for 2021-22:

In 2021-22 a third-party delivery program under the authority of Canadian Heritage was established, a contribution agreement with the Indigenous Screen Office was put in place and funding was disbursed from the Department to the ISO. The ISO launched calls for proposals and began accepting applications in September 2021.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22 a third-party delivery program under the authority of Canadian Heritage was established, a contribution agreement with the Indigenous Screen Office (ISO) was put in place and funding was disbursed from the Department to the ISO. The ISO launched calls for proposals and began accepting applications in September 2021.

From September 2021 to March 2022, ISO has been assessing all applications and distributing funding to selected projects.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In 2022-23, the ISO will complete its first year of full programming.

National partners: The ISO held a two-year national consultation that led to the launch of new programming initiatives in 2020-21.

Regional and community-based partners: The ISO continues to engage with Indigenous communities.

In spring 2021, the ISO began a cross-country consultation on Indigenous identity. The two-phased consultation included interviews with elders and key partners followed by broader public consultations.

The results will be integrated into the ISO's programming guidelines and policies going forward. The ISO plans to regularly consult with Indigenous communities and adjust its programming to the needs of its partners.

As an Indigenous-led initiative, the Indigenous Screen Office's program directly responds to Call for Justice 2.7 by supporting Indigenous creators, who through their work and projects, will improve the representation of Indigenous Peoples in Indigenous and non-Indigenous media outlets. It also responds to Call for Justice 6.1(i),6.1(ii) and 6.1(iii) by increasing funding and capacity building for Indigenous Peoples. In addition, as part of the process to providing additional ongoing funding to the ISO, PCH responds to Call for Miskotahâ 21 by using the findings in the Métis Specific-Gender Based Analysis Plus tool to guide the decisions on the program.

Supporting the digitization of and access to Indigenous documentary heritage

Lead Department: Library and Archives Canada

Funding: $14.9M/4 years

Description: Ensuring widespread access to material related to Indigenous language and culture through digitization initiatives. Renewing funding for initiatives aiming to support the digitization and preservation of Indigenous languages and stories.

Calls for Justice: 2.2(ii), 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 15.2, 16.2, 16.25, 17.25

Calls for Miskotahâ: 21

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Continuing meetings with the Indigenous Advisory Circle, Indigenous Peoples, organizations, and governments, and first meetings with survivors' groups and other community-level organizations or groups for advice and guidance on Indigenous initiatives (by end of March 2022).
  • Fully operational Indigenous research and digitization team (by end of March 2022) for We Are Here Sharing Stories (WAHSS).
  • Launch the first of the contributions funding calls under the Listen, Hear Our Voices (LHOV) contribution program for Indigenous nations, governments, and non-profit organizations to undertake digitization at the community level (by end of March 2022).
  • Review of Indigenous content to ensure established protocols and guidelines are followed and Indigenous perspectives are reflected in the creation of new Indigenous related content and incorporated into LAC's website and products.

Update on 2021-22:

  • LAC held two Virtual meetings of the Indigenous Advisory Circle in 2021-22, one in May 2021 and the second meeting was held in December 2021. In January 2022, LAC launched the process to create the second phase of new membership for the Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC). The new IAC phase will be in place for next FY 2022-23.
  • To date a team consisting of 3 Indigenous staff have begun working towards project goals for We Are Here Sharing Stories (WAHSS) including the project coordinator. The project leads are in the process of hiring 3 additional Indigenous staff to the team. This places our work as on track, although the hiring process may extend beyond March 2022.
  • The Listen, Hear Our Voices (LHOV) contribution program launched the fiscal year 2022-23 funding call for Indigenous nations, governments, and non-profit organizations to undertake digitization at the community level. The call was launched on November 17, 2021, and closed on January 28th, 2022.
  • The review of Indigenous content is ongoing, and both new LAC employees and existing LAC employees participate in this review through multiple series of meetings and committees. These efforts will continue on an ongoing basis. This review includes text (descriptions of records) in LAC catalogue; information presented to the public on LAC's website and through LAC's web presence (includes research guides, virtual exhibitions, blogs, podcasts, social media offerings.) Review of Indigenous-related content on LAC's website is scheduled to be completed by August 2022.

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • Research, digitization and description of Indigenous-specific documentary heritage in the collections at LAC begins (April 1, 2022).
  • Establishment of a visiting Elders program to provide support for Indigenous staff and guidance to LAC (by end of September 2022).
  • Establishment of plan to change and adapt its reference services to be more agile and responsive to the needs of Indigenous individuals, communities, organizations and governments (by end of March 2023).
  • Development and implementation of responsive Indigenous reference services and activities (by end of March 2023).
  • Launch of the second contributions funding call for Indigenous nations, governments, and non-profit organizations (by end of March 2023).

National partners: LAC developed the basis for the initiatives in 2017 in consultation with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and the Métis National Council. LAC will update Indigenous governments, other Indigenous governing bodies and Indigenous organizations as implementation continues and when significant developments or milestones take place.

Regional and community-based partners: An Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) was established to guide LAC on developing and implementing the Indigenous-specific initiatives. The IAC is composed of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation representatives from across the country. These individuals have expertise in archives, libraries, and other heritage institutions. The group has met 2-3 times a year since 2018 to guide this work. The IAC provides LAC with community-level perspectives and contacts that help promote LAC's services with regional and community partners. As the initiative develops, LAC will consult with the IAC on how to best to engage and collaborate with survivor and women's groups.

In a similar vein, an external Indigenous review committee composed of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation representatives (separate from the Indigenous Advisory Circle) will review applications to the contribution program and make recommendations for funding. The review committee also has a role in recommending adjustments to the contribution program and connecting LAC with regional and community partners.

Finally, as part of an Indigenous-led team, Indigenous advisors connect LAC with local, community, and regional Indigenous peoples and organizations.

The Indigenous Advisory Circle aligns with Calls for Justice 2.3, 15.2 and 17.25 as a safe and inclusive space with members representing First Nations, Inuit and Métis working to decolonize the decision process at Library and Archives Canada and to provide insight and guidance for Indigenous initiatives that are impactful.

Listen, Hear Our Voices (LHOV) funding program supports Call to Justice 2.2 (ii) indirectly, by increasing opportunities for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to access language and culture materials in safe spaces, including through digitization. The program also fully realizes elements of Call to Justice 2.4, which calls on governments to provide funding to preserve knowledge by digitizing interviews with Knowledge Keepers and language speakers.

We Are Here Sharing Stories (WAHSS) program responds to Calls for Justice 2.2 and 2.3 by prioritizing the digitization of published materials as well as archival materials in Indigenous languages as part of the project's digitization plan. WAHSS also responds to Call for Justice 15.2 by prioritizing digitization of records such as Residential School records. Further, The program responds to Calls for Justice 16.2 and 16.25 specifically by incorporating digitization of materials of significance to Inuit communities of various regions. WAHSS also responds to Call for Miskotahâ 21 specifically by digitizing content of significance to Métis Nation kinship ties, including Métis scrip records, Métis Red River long lot cartographic materials and other materials to be chosen in consultation with communities.

Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program (CSICP)

Lead Department: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Funding: $108.8M/2 years

Description: Supporting Indigenous communities in re-establishing and revitalizing cultural spaces that support Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ individuals through this new contribution program. Cultural spaces that may be built or revitalized may include but are not limited to longhouses, powwow grounds, heritage parks, and cultural centres. This investment ensures that women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ individuals have increased access to inclusive and safe cultural spaces where they can share experiences, connect with their communities, and participate in cultural activities without discrimination, harassment, or denial of identity.

Calls for Justice: 2.3

Calls for Miskotahâ: 21

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Summer 2021: Funding confirmed and program launched.
  • Fall 2021: Targeted call for proposals for groups at negotiation tables from August progressively expanded from September.
  • Winter 2021: Application closing in December and review of intake for fiscal year 2021-22 and fiscal year 2022-23 funding decisions.

Update on 2021-22:

The program was launched by CIRNAC end of July 2021 and the application period closed on December 1st, 2021.

It has received over 340 applications from coast to coast to coast for the construction or revitalization of spaces that support cultural activities within Indigenous communities.

To date a total $39,513,921 early investment into 14 Indigenous-led projects was made over two years (including $8,350,588 in 2021-22) to support safe access to cultural and language programming. The review of the remaining applications is currently being undertaken and a second round of recommendations is being finalized.

Amongst the early investments, 3 projects were announced by Minister Miller so far:

  • The Northern Secwepemc Cultural Centre (BC). This project is a culmination of a 17-year effort by five Northern Secwepemc First Nations to construct a cultural centre in their traditional territory.
  • The Skeetchestn Healing Through Culture project (BC). The combination of a pit home & museum will offer a safe location for members to reconnect with the Culture and Language and learn the historical importance and role that women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ individuals played in Secwepemc Culture.
  • Support to the Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke (QC) new multi-purpose cultural building including the Kanien'keha:ka Onkwawen:na Raotitiohkwa Language and Cultural Center (KORLCC) and the Turtle Island Theatre.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Initiative enters year 2 – its final confirmed year of funding. Projects under the program are completed and may begin to report on success.

National partners: In order to ensure proper coordination of funding and implementation, CSICP has been liaising and coordinating proactively with other government departments in particular with Canadian Heritage, Indigenous Services Canada and Infrastructure Canada.

Regional and community-based partners: The CSICP expects to grow and further its community engagement through regular program updates and sustained communication with funded partners. This includes 14 new Indigenous-led projects so far with more decisions and partner engagements expected in 2022-23.

The Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program responds to Call for Justice 2.3 requiring all governments to ensure that Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people have safe, no-barrier, permanent, and meaningful access to their cultures and languages in order to restore, reclaim, and revitalize their cultures and identities. The CSICP objectives also align with Call for Miskotahâ 21.

Progress to Date: Health and Wellness

The death of Joyce Echaquan in September 2020 was a harrowing reminder of the racism faced by Indigenous Peoples in Canada's healthcare systems. First Nations, Inuit and Métis deserve access to safe and quality healthcare, without fear of discrimination or racism. In 2021-22, the Government of Canada implemented substantial investments in the areas of health and wellness. As this summary details, funded initiatives have begun implementation with the goal to address anti-Indigenous racism in Canada's health systems, stabilize and expand programs dedicated to mental wellness, improve access to safe drinking water, and close the infrastructure gap by co-developing infrastructure plans and funding infrastructure projects. In the context of COVID-19, many of these issues have become even more pronounced, and require urgent attention.

Altogether, these actions support the key thematic objectives from the Federal Pathway, including through:

Key Highlights

In 2021-22:

This collection of critical information will help to guide and inform the best efforts of all health care workers to address and stop stigma and discrimination against Indigenous Peoples in health systems.

Margo Greenwood, Academic Leader, National Collaborating Centre For Indigenous Health
  • Engagement on distinctions-based Indigenous Health Legislation is underway with national and regional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis organizations and governments, federal partners, and provinces and territories. As of March 31, 2022, Indigenous Services Canada funded 36 Indigenous organizations to undertake engagement on this legislation, including national, urban/off-reserve, regional, women's, youth, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations, and 11 engagement reports have been received. Proposals requesting support for engagement activities continue to be received, and approximately 51 engagement reports are anticipated overall.
  • An Open Dialogue on Indigenous Health Legislation was held on February 23, 2022 as an opportunity to hear from voices from a distinctions+ based perspective (intersectional and/or not represented with a distinctions-based approach), with a focus on Indigenous academics, traditional knowledge keepers, community members, and students. The event design and day was guided by an Elders Advisory Circle, and the final graphic summary report will be publically available in English, French, Plains Cree, Ojibway, Michif, Mi'kmaq, and Inuktitut.
  • The Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund provided funding to 172 First Nation communities in support of 181 housing projects and 21 education facilities projects.
  • The Support for the Wellbeing of Families and Survivors of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People program was launched. Through this program, 19 Indigenous organizations received funding for projects that deliver healing and wellness activities, programs, and services to support the healing journeys of families and survivors.
  • Funding to support access to trauma informed health supports was renewed in Budget 2021, supporting access to emotional, cultural, and mental health supports for those affected by the ongoing crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.
  • The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) continues to work closely with Indigenous communities to build capacity for research and knowledge translation through major initiatives such as, the Indigenous Healthy Life Trajectories Initiative that uses the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease approach, specific to Indigenous social determinants of health and intergenerational impacts, and the Indigenous Gender and Wellness Initiative that supports Indigenous-led research to improve wellness among Indigenous communities from a gendered perspective. CIHR is also advancing health distinctions-based engagements and initiatives. As an example of this, the Inuit Research Network Grant, developed collaboratively with Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, was launched in August 2021 following a development grant phase.
  • Through Budget 2021, the Government of Canada made a transformative investment to build a Canada-wide early learning and child care system with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners. The Government of Canada has now reached bilateral agreements with every province and territory to implement a Canada-wide early learning and child care system. Through these bilateral agreements, provinces and territories will have federal funds to improve access to early learning and child care for Indigenous children through specific programming and funding initiatives.
  • The federal government will continue to work in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation to move toward a Canada-wide system that respects and responds to the unique needs of Indigenous children, regardless of where they live or access services. In addition to funding to provinces and territories, Indigenous-specific investments are advancing First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation early learning and child care priorities, guided by a co-developed Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework.

A Holistic Approach to Health and Wellness

In its Final Report, the National Inquiry illustrates the complexity of historical and contemporary factors rooted in Canada's colonial history that are still impacting Indigenous health and wellness to this day. These include factors such as discrimination and racism within health systems, but extend to other environmental issues as well, such as lack of safe water treatment facilities, sound infrastructure, and appropriate support services for all Indigenous people.

Taking these factors into account, the Government of Canada acknowledges the necessity of a broad, holistic and comprehensive approach to achieve meaningful improvements in the health and wellness of Indigenous Peoples. To this effect, addressing anti-indigenous racism in health systems is a top priority. Within these Health and Wellness initiatives are concrete steps working towards improved access to high quality and culturally safe health services for Indigenous women, girls, 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, people with disabilities and other marginalized groups who are disproportionately impacted by anti-Indigenous racism.

Significant efforts were made in 2021-22 to support Indigenous-led and community-based solutions and transform health services delivery to an Indigenous-led model. A number of projects were funded in 2021-22 from the Cultural Safety Partnership Fund to integrate cultural and patient safety in health systems, including the first ever First Nations Health Ombudsperson's Office in Saskatchewan, which works to ensure that First Nations individuals have a point of contact where they feel safe to be able to report incidents of discrimination when accessing health care services in Saskatchewan. Through Budget 2021, the Government of Canada also announced an investment of $597.6 million over three years, starting in 2021-22, for a distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategy with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation priorities on mental wellness. This investment ensures continued access to the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Supports Program and National IRS crisis line, which provide trauma-informed supports for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their family members. This investment will continue to build community-based supports and capacity and support workforce development.

The Government of Canada also understands that for meaningful and sustainable change to occur, Indigenous Peoples, groups, and governments must have a decisive role in the development of the policies and programs that directly impact them. To this end, the co-development of distinctions-based Indigenous Health Legislation initiative supports the continued engagement of Indigenous organizations and governments to provide their input on priorities to foster health systems that will respect and ensure the safety and well-being of Indigenous people. In 2020-21, Indigenous Services Canada and Health Canada convened three National Dialogues to provide new opportunities for bringing together governments, health systems partners and Indigenous health professional organizations in discussions on measures to address anti-Indigenous racism in Canada's health systems. These discussions helped identify many of the root causes and critical gaps that need to be addressed in healthcare–such as the need for cultural safety training tools, better Indigenous representation in health care, and accountability mechanisms to report incidents of racism–and the importance of transforming and expanding health systems to include practices that meet the unique needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation, including traditional approaches to health. The federal response to the national dialogues, funded through the Budget 2021 investment, consists of initiatives and activities that will improve access to high quality and culturally safe health services, including those for Indigenous women, 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples, people with disabilities and other marginalized groups who are disproportionately impacted by anti-Indigenous racism.

Over the last year, Indigenous Services Canada has also provided funding to national, regional, and targeted First Nations, Inuit, and Métis organizations and governments to lead this engagement. In addition, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)–the federal health research funding agency–informed by engagement with Indigenous partners and communities, prioritizes accelerating self-determination of Indigenous Peoples in the health research environment in its Strategic Plan (2021-2031), through actions to respect the rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples. CIHR continues to advance its Action Plan: Building a healthier future for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples, committing CIHR to implement a series of concrete actions further strengthening Indigenous health research in Canada.

The steps to end and redress this genocide must be no less monumental than the combination of systems and actions that has worked to maintain colonial violence for generations.

Reclaiming Power And Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry Into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, Volume 1B

Healing from trauma is essential on the path to health and wellness. Investments implemented in 2021-22 provided immediate supports to families and survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to assist them in their healing journeys. To this end, the Support for the Wellbeing of Families and Survivors program launched in 2021 funds Indigenous organizations to provide support and healing opportunities for families and survivors, by implementing Indigenous-led, community based, culturally relevant and trauma informed wellness activities, along with access to mental-health services and navigational supports. Examples include healing gatherings, feasts, cultural workshops, access to counselling services, and the creation of websites to help families and survivors navigate the supports available to them. There are also projects that promise significant and lasting impact. For instance, a commemorative project on the Highway of Tears in BC will expands its reach beyond the local community, as it will be accessible to a broader audience travelling this high-traffic road.

Finally, in 2021-22, the Government of Canada undertook important work to move forward on a key component of holistic wellness for Indigenous families and communities, by keeping them together. On January 4, 2022, the Government of Canada and the parties to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) complaint, regarding the First Nations Child and Family Services program and Jordan's Principle, and the parties to two Federal Court class actions announced that an Agreement-in-Principle on compensation and an Agreement-in-Principle on long-term reform were reached. The agreement-in-principle on compensation provides $20 billion for children who were removed from their homes under the First Nations Child and Family Services Program between April 1, 1991 and March 31, 2022 (as confirmed by the CHRT's order), who were impacted by the government's narrow definition of Jordan's Principle between December 12, 2007 and November 2, 2017 and who, as children, did not receive or were delayed in receiving an essential public service or product between April 1, 1991 and December 11, 2007. The objectives set out in the Long Term Reform agreement-in-principle are to reduce the number of First Nations children in care; keep children connected to their families, communities and cultures; and to ensure that First Nations children have access to the products, services and supports they need, when they need them. These objectives all contribute to ensure discrimination does not recur.

However, the work that has occurred throughout 2021-22 is only a beginning, with much more to come. In addition to the information provided in the tables on 2022-23, we invite you to consult the Looking Forward section for more information on new investments to support our commitment.

Federal Pathway Updates

The table below provides key updates on the status of progress for each initiative:

Initiative Update on 2021-22 Update on Engagement Calls for Justice/Calls for Miskotahâ

Reconciliation and Strength for Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people Through Sport–Sport for Social Development in Indigenous Communities (SSDIC) Stream Three

Lead department: Canadian Heritage

Funding: $14.3M/5 years and $2.9M ongoing

Description: Funding sports activity projects that seek to support one or more of the identified areas of focus drawn from the MMIWG Calls for Justice:

  • Physical and mental health;
  • Suicide prevention;
  • Sexual trafficking awareness and prevention;
  • Safe and healthy relationships; and
  • Sexual positivity (2SLGBTQQIA+).

Calls for Justice: 3.1, 7.3

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

In 2021-22, Canadian Heritage launched an interim process open only to Provincial/Territorial Aboriginal Sport Bodies with a deadline for submissions of January 5, 2022.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22, Canadian Heritage (PCH)'s interim process yielded 10 applications. The total requested amount of all 10 applications was $2,807,511 – an oversubscription of $307,511, which indicates that there remains a significant need and demand for this initiative. All 10 applications were recommended for their full base formula amount.

This program's funding recipients serve Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people from First Nations, Inuit, Métis, urban, and northern/remote communities across all of Canada. Projects are led by the community or in collaboration between the community and the client to reflect the culture and needs of participants.

In 2022-2023, Sport Canada will be undertaking a consultation process, facilitated by an Indigenous consultant firm, to evaluate and evolve the SSDIC program with a specific focus on improving the design of the SSDIC Stream Three initiative as it pertains to MMIWG areas of focus.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In 2022-2023, projects funded through the first call for proposals will begin, engagement with National and Regional/Community-based partners will occur to help design the program, and an open call for proposals will be launched.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Canadian Heritage will be seeking engagement with the Aboriginal Sport Circle and Provincial/Territorial Aboriginal Sport Bodies, Indigenous women's groups, other key organizations, and prominent individuals.

Indigenous Reconciliation and Strength for Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People (SSDIC Stream Three) was developed in response to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls' (MMIWG). Stream Three funds sports activity projects that create opportunities for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to participate in sport activities.

SSDIC Stream Three links to Call for Justice 3.1 by exclusively providing funding for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples in order to create more opportunities for these individuals to participate in sports activities that positively impact their self-identified health and wellness goals. It also links to Call for Justice 7.3 by supporting Indigenous-led prevention initiatives in the areas of health and community awareness through sport activities.

Addressing Anti-Indigenous Racism in Canada's Health Systems

Lead Department(s): Indigenous Services Canada, Health Canada

Funding: $111.8M/3 years (ISC); $14.9M/3 years (HC)

Description: Taking action to foster health systems free from racism and discrimination where Indigenous Peoples are respected and safe. This funding will support Indigenous-led community and regional initiatives that aim to strengthen cultural safety and address systemic as well as support capacity development to enable Indigenous partners to engage on their health priorities.

Calls for Justice: 1.8, 3.2, 3.4, 7.4, 7.6, 7.7

Calls for Miskotahâ: 6, 19

Indigenous Services Canada:

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Final confirmation of funding (January 2022), immediately followed by external and internal implementation of Year 1 funding (ISC). Year 1 includes funding for the following initiatives:
    1. Improving access to culturally safe services–$33.3 million over 3 years to expand support for Indigenous midwife and doula services, capacity funding for National Indigenous Women's organizations, funding for regional and grassroots organizations, and strengthening youth sexual health networks.
    2. Adapting health systems–$46.9 million over 3 years for the integration of cultural and patient safety at the local and systems levels, as well as through increased Indigenous representation in health professions. This includes a new Cultural Safety Partnership Fund at ISC and a new Anti-Racism program at Health Canada as well as Indigenous representation in health and human resources.
    3. Improving supports and accountability–$37.8 million over 3 years to provide Indigenous patients with supports and recourse to safely navigate federal and provincial health systems. This includes funding for Indigenous health systems navigators, patient advocates and targeted data collection.
    4. Providing federal leadership–$8.7 million over 3 years for the Government of Canada to continue bringing together all partners to advance concrete actions to address anti-Indigenous racism in Canada's health systems and to lead by example through the evaluation and improvement our own programs and practices. This includes continued national and regional dialogues as well as internal evaluation of ISC programming.
    5. Convening regionalized discussions with provincial and territorial government partners, to develop distinctions-based work plans to address anti-Indigenous racism in health systems.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22 Indigenous Services Canada provided $14M in funding to begin to address anti-Indigenous racism in Canada's health systems. Funding was provided to Indigenous organizations and communities for initiatives under all four themes. Capacity funding was provided for National Indigenous Women's organizations and regional and grassroots organizations, including the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC); Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak (LFMO); and Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada and for the strengthening of youth sexual health networks. Part of this funding supports their participation in the Indigenous Women's Wellbeing Advisory Committee. Co-chaired by Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak and the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, the Committee provides the Government of Canada with advice on issues impacting the health and wellness of First Nations, Inuit and Métis women. The Committee's current priorities include culturally safe sexual and reproductive health, GBA+ and family violence.

Funding was provided to 2 Spirits in Motion for improving access to culturally-safe health services and to join the Indigenous Women's Wellbeing Advisory Committee to provide a 2SLGBTQQIA+ perspective and share teachings on Indigenous Gender and Sexual Diverse cultural expressions and community strengths and needs.

Funding was also provided to the Native Youth Sexual Health Network to support their participation in the Indigenous Women's Wellbeing Advisory Committee, including helping the Committee to advance its priorities regarding cultural safety in sexual and reproductive health.

Funding to adapt health systems included support to National Indigenous health organizations, including the Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada and the Canadian Indigenous Nursing Association. $2.6M was also provided for scaling up existing Indigenous midwifery demonstration projects in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and supporting new Indigenous midwifery initiatives in other regions.

Under health and human resources, funding was provided to support the expansion of the Indigenous Practical Nursing Diploma for Rural and Remote Locations as well as the Manitoba First Responders Initiative to provide local First Nation people with the skill and knowledge to deliver emergency response and management and support in their communities. This program offers a stepping stone to those who desire to become an advanced community paramedic.

In addition, funding to improve supports and accountability included the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations proposal to create a First Nations Ombudsperson office, and funding to the National Association of Friendship Centres to advance their work on health system navigators. Some examples of projects funded under the 4th theme include: support for regional and Indigenous-led roundtables organized by the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada, Atlantic Policy Congress and Turtle Lodge.

In support of adapting health systems to better meet Indigenous needs, funding was also provided for the integration of cultural and patient safety at the local and systems levels, as well as through increased Indigenous representation in health professions. This includes a new Cultural Safety Partnership Fund at Indigenous Services Canada.

In 2020 and 2021, Indigenous Services Canada also held its three National Dialogues on anti-Indigenous racism in health systems. Reports from these sessions are publicly available.

In order to improve supports and accountability in healthcare, funding was provided to offer Indigenous patients supports and recourses to safely navigate federal and provincial health systems. This includes funding for Indigenous health systems navigators, patient advocates and targeted data collection.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The Government of Canada will provide federal leadership and funding to continue bringing together all partners in order to advance concrete actions in addressing anti-Indigenous racism in Canada's health systems and to lead by example through the evaluation and improvement our own programs and practices. This includes continued national and regional dialogues as well as internal evaluation of ISC programming.

In addition, ISC will provide continued funding to First Nations, Inuit, Métis organizations and governments, as well as to other Indigenous groups (women, youth, 2SLGBTQQIA+, urban) to improve access to culturally safe services, adapt health systems, improve supports and accountability and engage in national and regional dialogues in Years 2 and 3 of the funding.

Indigenous Services Canada:

National partners: Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, national Indigenous health professional organizations, and National Indigenous Organizations, as well as other Indigenous organizations, health systems partners, and educational institutions.

Regional and community-based partners: Provincial/Territorial Government representatives, regional/community-based health system partners, Indigenous governments and communities.

Indigenous Services Canada:

Budget 2021 provided $126.7M over three years to improve access to high quality and culturally safe services, including those for Indigenous women and girls, 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples, people with disabilities and other marginalized groups who are disproportionately impacted by anti-Indigenous racism (Calls for Justice 3.2, 3.4, 7.4; Call for Miskotahâ 6).

The following Indigenous organizations were funded $350k from Budget 2021's anti-Indigenous racism initiative: Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC); Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak (LFMO); and Pauktuutit. The funding to LFMO above responds to Calls for Miskotahâ 6. The funding supports the organizations to address Indigenous women's health and anti-Indigenous racism issues, to advance policy development work on issues such as: forced and coerced sterilization, ISC's cultural competence and GBA+ work, cultural and patient safety in health systems, and in ensuring women's voices and perspectives are included in policy development. Further, $2.6M was provided through Budget 2021 to expand support for Indigenous midwives and doulas.

Finally, ISC will provide funding for increased Indigenous representation in health professions as well as capacity support for national Indigenous health organizations, including Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada, Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association and National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, supporting Call for Justice 7.7.

Health Canada:

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Final confirmation of funding (January 2022).
  • Establishing the new Addressing Racism and Discrimination in Canada's Health Systems Program and preparing to launch the Call for Proposals to address systemic racism.
  • Drafting Health Portfolio Indigenous Engagement Strategy.

Update on 2021-22:

Health Canada has established the new Addressing Racism and Discrimination in Canada's Health Systems Program that aims to foster health systems free from racism and discrimination.

The 2022 Call for Proposals is seeking proposals for projects that address anti-Indigenous racism and discrimination. Projects must be either Indigenous-led or undertaken in partnership with Indigenous Peoples, and be inclusive of the voices of Indigenous Peoples with lived and living experiences of racism and/or discrimination in the health systems.

Health Canada continues to provide funding to the National Consortium for Indigenous Medical Education to support the implementation of Indigenous-led work streams that will transform Indigenous medical education and contribute to the delivery of culturally safe care.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Health Canada will continue to provide federal leadership to address systemic racism and eliminate barriers to accessing services within health systems. This includes launching the inaugural Call for Proposals, announcing successful applicants, and continuing to support future National Dialogues.

Health Canada:

National partners: Pan-Canadian Health Organizations and national health system partners; National Indigenous Organizations; and national Indigenous health system partners.

Regional and community-based partners: Provincial/Territorial governments; Indigenous governments, organizations and communities; regional and community-based health system partners; and educational institutions.

Health Canada:

Health Canada's new Program was established to support systems-level, community-supported projects that address racism and discrimination perpetrated against Indigenous Peoples, including women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples. It will also support building capacity within Indigenous communities and/or organizations that serve Indigenous Peoples to enable them to meaningfully engage on their health priorities (Call for Justice 3.2).

In alignment with the Program's priority areas, investments will be made to support the development, implementation and testing of interventions; designing and implementing data collection efforts; fostering knowledge mobilization; and supporting capacity building. This could include tools, standards, guidelines, training/learning materials and resources (Calls for Justice 7.6,7.7) as well as supporting the inclusion of traditional approaches to health and improving accountability mechanisms (Call for Miskotahâ 19).

Comprehensive Approach to Mental Wellness

Lead Department(s): Indigenous Services Canada, Health Canada

Funding: $597.6M/3 years (B2021); $107.2M in 2021-22 (August 2021)

Description: Within the context of a distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies, this funding ensures continues access to the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Supports Program and National Indian Residential Schools crisis line, which provides trauma-informed supports for Survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their family members. This investment will continue to build community-based supports and capacity, and support workforce development.

Calls for Justice: 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.7, 7.2, 7.3, 17.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: 53

Planned for 2021-22:

  • The implementation of Budget 2021 funding to renew trauma-informed health supports for survivors of Indian Residential Schools, Day schools, and those affected by the issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.
  • The implementation of Budget 2021 funding to invest in distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies for First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22, trauma-informed health and cultural supports provided access to trauma-informed mental wellness services for Survivors, family members, and others affected by the ongoing crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. These services include access to cultural supports (Traditional Healers, Elders); emotional supports (Indigenous health workers, trained peer supports); professional counselling services (psychologists, social workers); and assistance with the cost of transportation to access services as needed.

The Government of Canada funds a network of over 135 community-based organizations to deliver emotional and cultural support services. These organizations are diverse, and serve First Nations, Inuit, and Métis clients of all ages, on and off reserve, in the North, and in urban settings. Communities and organizations hire workers that understand the local context and who can provide culturally-relevant supports that are tailored to the needs of the clients they serve. For communities, this means hiring a worker from the community who is embedded in the culture and who may speak the language. In urban settings, an organization might decide that it is most important to hire someone that is familiar with the needs of their clientele and who can meet the needs of clients with diverse identities.

More broadly, Budget 2021 provides $597.6 over three years, starting in 2021-22, in support of distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation. This investment renews funding for the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Supports Program and National IRS crisis line, which provide trauma-informed supports for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their family members. This investment also continued to build community-based supports and capacity and supported workforce development. Through this investment, the Government of Canada continues to support the development and implementation of Indigenous-led, community-based approaches to the delivery of culturally-appropriate services that meet community needs, including for life promotion and suicide prevention, wraparound services at opioid agonist treatment sites and mental wellness teams.

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • The implementation of Budget 2022 funding to maintain trauma-informed, culturally-appropriate, Indigenous-led services to improve mental wellness, and to support efforts initiated through Budget 2021 to co-develop distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies.
  • Continued support for the national 24/7 MMIWG crisis line offering immediate emotional assistance.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Emotional and cultural supports are delivered through a network of approximately 135 community-based organizations across the country. Mental health counselling is provided by regulated health providers, in good standing with their provincial or territorial regulatory body, and enrolled with Indigenous Services Canada.

In response to Call for Justice 3.3, Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Health and Cultural Supports provide access to trauma-informed supports for Survivors, and support healing from unresolved trauma, to help address Call for Justice 7.2.

Complementary investments in Indigenous mental wellness also contribute to the Government of Canada's response to the following Calls for Justice:

  • 3.2 – Providing adequate, stable, equitable, and ongoing Indigenous-centred and community-based health and wellness services.
  • 3.4 – Ensure sustainable, permanent, no-barrier, preventative, accessible, holistic, wraparound services.
  • 3.7 – Provide continual and accessible healing programs and support.
  • 7.3 – Support prevention services including suicide prevention strategies.

Continued support for access to trauma-informed health and cultural supports to members of the Métis Nation will help address the Call for Miskotahâ 53.

In recognition of the unique circumstances and needs of the Métis Nation, a specific allocation from Budget 2021 investments was identified for the Métis Nation, helping begin to address the Call for Justice 17.4 and Call for Miskotahâ 53.

Co-development of Distinctions-Based Indigenous Health Legislation

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $15.6M/2 years

Description: Working collaboratively with national and regional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis organizations and governments, federal partners, as well as provinces and territories to co-develop distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation that supports the vision expressed through various federal commitments, and that sets the stage for high-quality, culturally relevant health care for all Indigenous Peoples.

Calls for Justice: 3.1, 3.2, 3.6

Calls for Miskotahâ: 9c, 53, 56, 57

Planned for 2021-22:

Pre-engagement on the Co-development of Distinctions-Based Indigenous Health Legislation started in January 2021, with the engagement phase expected to end by Spring 2022.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22, Indigenous Services Canada funded 36 Indigenous organizations to undertake engagement, including women's, national, urban/off-reserve, regional, youth, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations.

A summary report from the one-day virtual event, "An Open Dialogue on Indigenous Health Legislation", which featured an Elders Advisory Circle and Indigenous academics and knowledge keepers from across the traditional territories in Canada, will be released in the Spring of 2022.

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • Indigenous Services Canada anticipates funding additional engagement next fiscal year as proposals continue to be received from Indigenous organizations at both the national and regional level interested in participating in the engagement process.
  • Indigenous Services Canada will also be working with partners to produce a co-analyzed "What we Heard" report that summarizes all of the engagement undertaken on Indigenous health legislation. This work will help to inform the next phase which is the co-development of legislative options.

National and Regional/community-based partners:

  • National Indigenous Organizations,
  • Regional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis organizations and governments
  • Self-Governing and Modern-Treaty Holders
  • Indigenous Women, urban, youth, 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations
  • Indigenous Health Professional Associations
  • Métis outside of the Métis Nation's recognized constituency
  • Provinces and Territories
  • Outreach to academics, legal scholars, and knowledge keepers
  • Outreach to the general public

The scope of legislation has yet to be determined and will be established in partnership with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis partners. Having said that, federal legislation creates several opportunities to support Calls for Justice and Calls for Miskotahâ. For example, federal Indigenous health legislation is an opportunity to:

  • Establish a new approach as current policy tools have not been enough to close the gaps in health outcomes (CFJ 3.1, 3.2, 3.6, and CFM 9.c, 53, 56, 57).
  • Seek to address systemic issues, e.g., create a framework for transformative change that provides more stability (CFJ 3.2, 3.6, and CFM 9.c, 53, 56, 57).
  • Offer a stable framework for change and for building trust (CFJ 3.1, 3.6 and CFM 9.c, 53, 56, 57).
  • Provide a variety of measures to support Indigenous Peoples to pursue their aspirations, goals, and interests, including the exercise of their rights, as they relate to health (CFJ 3.1, and CFM 53, 56, 57).
  • Offer a concrete framework in which agreements and partnerships can occur according to communities' needs (CFJ 3.2, 3.6 and CFM 56, 57).
  • Have commitments backed with stable resources, i.e., long-term, predictable, and stable funding (CFJ 3.1, 3.2, 3.6, and CFM 9.c, 53, 56, 57).

Improving access to safe, clean drinking water in First Nation communities

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding:

  • FES 2020: $1.5B / 6 years and $114.1M ongoing
  • B21: $1.1B / 2 years (2022-23 to 2023-24)

Description: Ensuring access to safe clean drinking water for First Nations communities on reserve.

Calls for Justice: 4.1

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

With a total funding allocation of $1.11 billion in 2021-22 (with $944 million from the 2020 Fall Economic Statement and $164 million from Budget 2019), these investments will support First Nations in ensuring sustainable access to clean water and wastewater treatment in First Nations communities.

Update on 2021-22:

Significant and continued investments have been made to support water and wastewater systems.

Indigenous Services Canada has now increased operations and maintenance funding support to First Nations for water and wastewater infrastructure, which now covers 100% of the operations and maintenance funding formula, up from 80%. The updated operations and maintenance formula better accounts for operating and maintenance costs, and includes new funding to support operators directly (salary, retention, and back-up support).

Indigenous Services Canada continues to support First Nations in addressing the remaining drinking water advisories. In 2021-22, First Nations lifted 25 long-term drinking water advisories from public systems on reserve. Moreover, 34 short-term advisories have been lifted thereby not becoming long-term advisories. Additional initiatives are underway in 28 communities to resolve the remaining 33 long-term drinking water advisories.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In 2022-23, additional funding will support First Nations in ensuring sustainable access to clean water and wastewater treatment in First Nations communities. These investments include combined commitments proposed in Budget 2022 and made in Budget 2021, 2020 Fall Economic Statement, and Budget 2019.

The Department launched a call for proposals on March 2, 2022, to enhance capacity support for water and wastewater operators in 2022-23 and 2023-24. The initiative includes a focus on empowering women and youth in water operations, and creating safe working environments for 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Communities being allocated resources to resource safe, clean drinking water.

These initiatives are in response to Call for Justice 4.1, calling on governments to ensure that all Indigenous Peoples have access to clean drinking water in their communities.

Co-development of Infrastructure Plans

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $25.9M/2 years

Description: Closing the infrastructure gap in Indigenous communities by supporting the co-development of infrastructure plans with Indigenous partners, which will help pave the way to address critical infrastructure needs in First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation communities.

Calls for Justice: 4.1, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 13.5, 16.5, 16.7

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

  • From May to August 2021 – the Initial engagement of key partners, including Indigenous Representative Organizations.
  • In Fall/Winter 2021–Work with Indigenous Representative Organizations to launch distinctions-based engagement with Indigenous communities.
  • October 2021 – A Working document is developed with the Inuit to identify Infrastructure needs within their communities.
  • Winter 2022–Launch of the process to request community level information on infrastructure needs within First Nations communities.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-2022, this initiative provided funding to Inuit regional organizations and the national Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami to collect information needed to do an assessment of Inuit community/regional infrastructure needs. A report will be available late fall/winter 2022.

Indigenous Services Canada also provided funding for the department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to undertake engagement activities with Métis, Self-Governing and Modern Treaty Nations.

Indigenous Services Canada has raised regional awareness of the project and the need to collect information from individual First Nations on their respective infrastructure needs to close the infrastructure gap by 2030. The work is progressing well and Indigenous Services Canada should receive community lists of infrastructure needs throughout the Summer of 2022.

Indigenous Services Canada has been working with Indigenous organizations, such as the Assembly of First Nations to identify areas for co-development. The Assembly of First Nations identified that First Nations could benefit from support to develop long-term community infrastructure plans. Indigenous Services Canada is working with the Assembly of First Nations to finalize an approach. Regional engagements to support communities with long-term infrastructure planning will be launched over the coming months.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In 2022-23, Indigenous Services Canada will be engaging Indigenous communities to provide the Department with community-identified lists of critical infrastructure and housing needs, inclusive of funding to repair existing infrastructure, for addressing the critical infrastructure gap. This includes:

  • March to June 2022: Engage communities and obtain lists of new infrastructure assets and repairs to existing assets needed to close the infrastructure gap by 2030.
  • June to September 2022: In-depth analysis and costing of requests submitted by communities.
  • Fall/Winter 2023: Develop documentation for potential Budget 2023 inclusion.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada are working closely with Indigenous Organizations to co-develop distinctions-based engagement strategies. Communities will have broad engagement options through the department directly, Indigenous organizations or a web portal.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 4.1; 4.6; 4.7; 4.8; 13.5; 16.5; and 16.7, oriented toward infrastructure in Indigenous communities. Call for Justice 4.1 calls on the government to ensure Indigenous Peoples have services and infrastructure that meet their social and economic needs. The co-development of community infrastructure plans is the first step to addressing the long-standing issues. It is important to note that the identification of needs rests with each individual community, giving them the opportunity to specify their priorities.

In support of Calls to Justice 4.6, 4.7, and 4.8, Indigenous communities will have an opportunity to identify their housing, shelter, transition homes and transportation needs in their lists of required infrastructure to close the infrastructure gap that exists between most Indigenous and non-indigenous communities. ISC also is working with Indigenous Partners to ensure that a GBA/Diversity lens is applied to the identification of infrastructure assets needed to close the infrastructure gap and with how the federal government can implement indigenous infrastructure differently and better.

As noted in Call for Justice 13.5, an integral component of the analysis of the requested infrastructure will be to ensure the capacity of the existing infrastructure to support any new developments and take measures in instances where new or expanded capacity will be needed.

As noted in Calls to Justice 16.5 and 16.7, Inuit communities/regions will have the opportunity to identify any Internet and telecommunications requirements as well as those to ensure the availability of effective, culturally appropriate, and accessible health and wellness services in their report on the assessment of infrastructure needs.

Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund

Lead Department(s): Indigenous Services Canada, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Funding: ISC+CIRNAC: $4.3B/4 years

Description: Funding to support immediate demands, as prioritized by Indigenous partners, with shovel ready infrastructure projects for First Nations, including those with modern treaty and self-governing First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation communities.

Calls for Justice: 4.6, 4.7, 13.5, 16.19

Calls for Miskotahâ: 25, 26

Planned for 2021-22:

First Nations:

  • August–September 2021: Finalization of design of the program and finalization of the new "Grant to the Métis Nation British Columbia from the Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund".
  • Indigenous Services Canada funding flows for the implementation of shovel-ready projects for housing, education facilities and health infrastructure for First Nations on reserve.
  • Late 2021: Launch of a call for proposals process to select shovel-ready projects for the Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples program.
  • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) funding flows to Inuit, Métis, Northern, and Self-Government and Modern Treaty communities. CIRNAC is to enter into agreements with each of the governing members of the Métis Nation and the Métis Settlements General Council to deliver Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund programming to their respective members.
  • CIRNAC engages with Self-Government Agreements and Modern Treaties partners on a government-to-government basis to determine funding allocations for each Indigenous government.

Inuit:

Since 2016, the Government of Canada has committed over $800 million to improve the housing conditions in the four Inuit regions of Inuit Nunangat. Through the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee, Inuit and the Government of Canada are implementing the co-developed Inuit Nunangat Housing Strategy (2019). The overall goal of the Strategy is to improve housing outcomes in Inuit Nunangat in line with the rest of Canada.

Budget 2021 announced the $4.3 billion Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund (ICIF) for Indigenous‑led infrastructure and housing projects. From this amount, a total of $517.8M over four years is being delivered to the four Inuit land claims organizations / governments for Inuit-led infrastructure. This represents historic, distinctions-based infrastructure investments.

Métis:

Investment made in 2021-2022 by Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs through the Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund will support better access to community and cultural centres, transportation infrastructure, water and wastewater systems, rental and temporary housing developments, and housing projects associated with culturally appropriate healing programs.

Update for 2021-22:

First Nations:

Investment made in 2021-2022 by Indigenous Services Canada through the Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund in the areas of housing, school facilities and access to health care infrastructure, will help communities address critical infrastructure gaps and alleviate the disproportionate impact COVID-19 has had on Indigenous people. As of December 31, 2021, the department provided funding to 172 First Nation communities in support of the following projects:

  • 181 Housing projects to address on-reserve housing needs, including new builds, retrofits and renovations.
  • 21 School facilities projects to support new construction and/or renovations to existing schools.

In addition, Indigenous Services Canada provided funding in 2021-22 in support of 16 health infrastructure projects.

Inuit:

With this funding, Inuit are prioritizing areas that have been historically and chronically underfunded, such as community centres, sports and leisure facilities, multi-purpose spaces; transportation and road repair work; small craft harbour and community dock enhancements; community kitchens and greenhouses; child and elder care centres, women's shelters, and short-term lodging for construction workers, with flexibility to pivot to support tourism and other community needs post-construction.

Métis:

Funding provided by the department is planned to support:

  • 55 housing units to serve as low-income rentals and temporary accommodations for families travelling to access hospital care
  • 15 mixed-use community buildings to enable culturally-informed programming for wellness, mental health and addictions, and a place for citizens to access government services

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • Funding and implementation of shovel-ready projects;
  • Funding for Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples and water and wastewater projects begins in 2022-23.

National and Regional/community-based partners: ISC and CIRNAC will work closely with Indigenous partners on a distinctions basis to support implementation of this funding (First Nations on reserve, Inuit, Métis, Self-Governing and Modern Treaty communities, northern Indigenous communities, and urban and rural Indigenous service delivery organizations). The departments will draw on past engagement and co-development which informed the Budget 2021 requests. ISC and CIRNAC will also work with all other relevant federal departments to support a whole-of-government approach to addressing Indigenous infrastructure needs.

As of this fiscal year, ICIF funding earmarked for health infrastructure is being used toward 19 shovel-ready infrastructure projects. These investments can be linked to Call for Justice 13.5, that policing, social services and health services are adequately staffed and resourced in the context of meeting the anticipated needs of host communities where development projects and resource extraction may be taking place.

The ICIF also supports Call for Justice 4.6, which calls for the Government to commence the construction of new housing and the provision of repairs for existing housing to meet the housing needs of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people. The fund supports the immediate demands, as determined by Indigenous partners, for ongoing, new and shovel-ready projects in Indigenous communities, including First Nations, Indigenous Self-Government and Modern Treaty partners, Inuit and Métis communities, and can include new housing constructions, renovation, and retrofit projects.

Further, ICIF funding can support Call for Justice 4.7 which calls for the establishment and long-term sustainable funding of Indigenous-led low-barrier shelters, safe spaces, transition homes, second-stage housing, and services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people who are homeless, near homeless, dealing with food insecurity, or in poverty, and who are fleeing violence or have been subjected to sexualized violence and exploitation. From 2022-2023 to 2024-2025, $194.9 million will be allocated to eligible urban and rural Indigenous service delivery organizations to directly support retrofits, repairs and upgrades to existing facilities, as well as support the construction of new publicly-accessible community buildings that serve the needs of urban and rural Indigenous Peoples. Indirectly, these organizations would deliver services that could support Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people at the determination and direction of Indigenous partners.

In its Inuit and Métis components, this initiative also supports Call for Justice 16.19 and Calls for Miskotahâ 25 and 26.

Support for the Wellbeing of Families and Survivors of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People

Lead Department: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Funding: $12.5M/5 years and $2.5M ongoing

Description: Supporting the wellbeing and healing journeys of families and survivors across Canada through project-based funding, provided through an annual Call for Proposals. The evaluation process for proposals could include collaboration with the National Family and Survivor Circle in future calls for proposals.

Calls for Justice: 3.7, 5.6, 17.20

Calls for Miskotahâ: 20

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Upon confirmation of funding for this program in summer 2021, engagement took place with the National Families and Survivors Circle on its development and design.
  • The inaugural call for proposals to the new program was launched in August 2021, with a submission deadline of October 14 2021.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-22, this new program funded 19 projects led by Indigenous organizations. These organizations are comprised of 9 First Nation, 2 Inuit, 1 Métis and 7 organizations that include two or more distinctions. Of these organizations, 9 provide Stream One – Individual Projects, 4 provide Stream Two – Resource/Navigator Service and 6 offer a combination of the two streams.

Individual projects include commemorative events and installations, healing gatherings, and workshops. Resource/navigator services include access to websites that will help navigate to services and resources such as wellness kits, counselling services, referrals to supports and services, increased operating hours of safe spaces to allow for more access to services, establishing a community committee that will be trained and equipped to respond to families and survivors' needs.

All funded organizations are indigenous, and include Inuit regional government organizations, First Nations, Métis, service delivery and grass roots organizations.

Coming up in 2022-23:

A new call will be opened for 2022-23. In addition, approximately 15 organizations will be funded for new projects in 2022-23, in addition to the continued funding provided to organizations for multi-year projects from 2020/21, thus providing additional resources and supports to family members and survivors through the program.

National partners: National Family and Survivors Circle (for design of program)

Regional and community-based partners: For implementation: Indigenous grassroots groups, non-profit organizations, communities etc.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice oriented toward supporting Indigenous organizations to deliver healing and wellness activities, programs, and services to families and survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, including children and youth and links in the following ways:

Responding to the Call for Justice 3.7, the design of this program involved discussions with the National Family and Survivors' Circle regarding eligibility requirements and other factors. To address this call, new Terms and Conditions were created for this program that aim to improve accessibility and remove barriers to support.

In response to Call for Justice 5.6, the program guidelines are designed to fill existing gaps and expand the scope of activities eligible for funding, and also addresses Call for Justice 17.20 through its program guidelines and eligibility.

In response to Call for Justice 20, this program funds Indigenous organizations and families, inclusive of the Métis, to engage in healing work. As such, it supports this call in the area of healthcare and child and family welfare.

More broadly, the initiative also links to the Principles for Change that underpin the National Inquiry's Calls for Justice through support for culturally relevant and trauma informed Indigenous led projects and services. The initiative also supports distinctions across Canada including in urban, northern and remote locations.

Progress to Date: Human Safety and Security

In 2021-22, the Government of Canada implemented substantial investments in the areas of human safety and security. These initiatives have promoted the human safety and security of Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people by recognizing the many facets that comprise human security and their interconnectedness; being people-centered and appropriate to local realities where communities and individuals have control over their well-being and livelihoods, and drive solutions; striving to proactively prevent human security violations; and providing safe spaces and transitional housing for Indigenous women, children and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people experiencing and fleeing violence.

Altogether, these actions support several key thematic objectives from the Federal Pathway, including:

Key Highlights

  • Work on 12 new cell towers along Highway 16, also known as the Highway of Tears, is now underway. When complete, the project will provide an additional 252 km of cell coverage along the road, which has been the site of many murders and disappearances over the last several decades.
  • As part of the Rapid Housing Initiative Round 2, close to $1.5 billion has been committed to support the creation of over 5,400 new affordable units to help address urgent housing needs of vulnerable Canadians, especially in the context of COVID-19. Of these units, over 2,400 are for Indigenous people.
  • Reaching Home provided $92,098,509 in funding to 24 organizations to support community-based approaches to Urban, Rural, and Remote Indigenous homelessness under the Indigenous homelessness funding stream.
  • As of December 31, 2021, the National Housing Strategy has committed an estimated $7.1 billion towards meeting the housing needs of women and their children, which includes funding for the construction, repair and support of approximately 340,000 housing units.
  • Budget 2021 provided Women and Gender Equality Canada with $55M over five years to bolster the capacity of Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations to provide gender-based violence prevention programming. A Call for Proposals was launched on January 27, 2022 and closed on March 10, 2022. Implementation of projects is expected to start by fall 2022.
  • Through the Elementary and Secondary Education Program, funding is now being provided in southern Canada to First Nations on reserve for the provision of menstrual products for students. In support of First Nations control of First Nations education, First Nations and First Nations-designated education organizations will make decisions on how to purchase and distribute menstrual products to their students.
  • The Government of Canada is investing $14.9 billion over the next eight years in reliable, fast, affordable, and clean public transit. This funding includes $3 billion per year in permanent, predictable federal public transit funding which will be available to support transit solutions beginning in 2026/27. The Rural Transit Solutions Fund is the first federal fund to target the development of transit solutions in rural and remote communities. It is making $250 million in federal funding available over 5 years, beginning in 2021, to support the development of locally-driven transit solutions that will help people living in rural communities get to work, school, appointments, and visit loved ones. The Rural Transit Solutions Fund also supports reconciliation by improving the safety of Indigenous women, girls and two-spirited individuals who live in rural and remote areas. A minimum of 10% of the total $250 million funding envelope for Rural Transit Solutions Fund will be allocated to projects that benefit Indigenous populations and communities.

A Comprehensive Approach to Security

The Government of Canada understands that human safety and security at both the individual and the community level is dependent on many different socio-economic and other factors. This is why Federal Pathway initiatives implemented in 2021-22 come from a wide range of departments and agencies, and cover a wide range of programs and services. The Covid-19 pandemic has meant increased rates of domestic violence towards women and children and created increased urgency for all governments to take immediate and increased actions to address gender-based violence.

A growing number of projects consider the importance of Indigenous-led solutions and services, including the implementation of investments into shelters. In June 2021, the Government of Canada, through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), with the help of Indigenous partners, announced 12 new emergency shelters for Indigenous women, children, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people escaping family violence across Canada. Over $85 million will build and support shelter operations over 5 years, as well as an additional $10.2 million annually thereafter. The 12 new shelters will be built in partnership with the following communities:

When I meet with and listen to grassroots Indigenous organizations, I'm reminded that we can't end gender-based violence without ensuring the safety of Indigenous women, girls, Two-Spirit and LGBTQQIA+ people. Frontline organizations, advocates and volunteers are the heart of systemic change, and I'm committed to supporting their work. This funding will help create educational projects, capacity building and improve critical services for people in need. Reconciliation requires collaborative action. Only then can we build safer communities, and more importantly, an inclusive Canada for all.

The Honourable Marci Ien, P.C., M.P., Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Youth
  • Lil'wat Nation, British Columbia
  • Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation, Alberta
  • Whitefish Lake First Nation #459, Alberta
  • Prince Albert Grand Council, Saskatchewan
  • Keeseekoowenin, Manitoba
  • Hollow Water, Manitoba
  • Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario
  • Odanak First Nation, Quebec
  • Natoaganag (Eel Ground) First Nation, New Brunswick
  • Acadia First Nation, Nova Scotia
  • Council of Yukon First Nations, Yukon
  • Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, Northwest Territories

These Indigenous-led shelters will provide vital refuge and culturally appropriate critical supports and services to help survivors of family violence recover from the trauma of their experiences, access support programming and create a stable environment where they can begin to regain an independent life. In these and other investments, lived experience is taking centre stage. Within the context of the shelter-related initiatives, a committee of Indigenous women with expertise in shelter and housing delivery and with lived experience of shelter needs has been formed to provide direction on implementation. Similarly, in 2021-22, Reaching Home worked with Modern Treaty Holder partners to establish 7 new agreements and 14 amendments to existing agreements to increase the funds flowing to self-governing Indigenous communities from all distinctions, signaling an important focus on Indigenous homelessness within a distinctions-based lens with dedicated funding to address the unique needs of different Indigenous groups and individuals experiencing or at risk of experiencing homelessness.

Ensuring Indigenous voices are leading the conversation on prevention is just one way that the Government of Canada is working to transform and accelerate the implementation of the Federal Pathway. Initiatives such as Women and Gender Equality's funding to bolster the capacity of Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations to provide gender-based violence prevention programming are aimed at addressing the root causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. The importance of prevention is also being emphasized through the National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking, supported by an investment of $57.22 million over five years beginning in 2019-20 and $10.28 million ongoing, to provide funding to organizations to deliver trauma-informed and culturally-relevant supports and services to victims and survivors of human trafficking, including Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Public Safety Canada is funding projects across Canada that provide transition, second stage housing, mental health and employment services and supports, as well as training and tools to gain financial independence. Through the National Strategy, Public Safety Canada is working on developing culturally relevant and gender responsive multi-sectoral training tools for the healthcare transportation and hospitality sectors in order to enable front-line service providers to effectively identify and report suspected cases of human trafficking.

Indigenous partners have been clear: personal and community safety are linked, and a number of investments related to improving the safety of the communities in which Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people live have been implemented. For instance, Public Safety Canada supports Indigenous-led community safety and wellbeing approaches through the expansion of the Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative (ACSPI) and its coordination with the Northern and Indigenous Crime Prevention Fund (NICPF). The ACSPI is a tailored and responsive program designed to address the safety concerns, priorities and unique circumstances of Indigenous communities through the development of Community Safety Plans (CSPs) which identify community strengths, assets, and safety and wellness goals. Using time-limited funding, and by aligning the ACSPI and the NICPF, Indigenous communities are supported to build capacity to develop and deliver holistic, innovative, community-led crime prevention programs and services. The Initiative is also expanding outreach and engagement efforts to address current gaps in participation in various jurisdictions, including with Inuit and Métis communities. The NICPF, as part of the National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS), has secured a dedicated source of funds to ensure this marginalized population is better served to develop, implement and evaluate culturally sensitive crime prevention practices to address community-identified needs, in Inuit, Métis and First Nations communities on reserve, as well as in the North and in urban areas.

In 2017, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) established the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee for the Trans Mountain Expansion and Existing Pipeline (IAMC-TMX), which brings together 13 Indigenous and six senior federal representatives to provide advice to regulators and to monitor the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMEP) and existing pipeline. A key priority of the Committee is identifying and addressing the impacts of temporary work camps and the influx of workers. In fiscal year 2021-22 the Committee, alongside Indigenous community representatives, federal regulators and Trans Mountain, co-developed three regional initiatives designed, in part, to strengthen Indigenous monitoring and management of socioeconomic, cultural, and health and wellbeing risks and effects associated with TMEP's five work camps in British Columbia and the high influx of workers using temporary accommodations in the Yellowhead region of Alberta. This fiscal the Committee also identified key issues and priorities in relation to the socioeconomic effects of major resource projects on Indigenous communities through research carried out in collaboration with Indigenous communities in British Columbia (the Fraser Valley) and Alberta (Yellowhead region). Examples of identified priorities related to MMWIG include safe access to traditional harvesting and hunting sites, rental costs and rental availability, and Indigenous worker safety when far from their home community. Through the Committee's regional initiatives and research, Indigenous communities along the pipeline corridor have voiced a strong interest in actively engaging in the identification of priority areas of concern and the co-development of policy and programs focused on addressing the socioeconomic, cultural and health and wellbeing impacts of temporary work camps and influx of workers.

It is with great pride and satisfaction that I acknowledge our Education team in achieving Regional education agreement status. This allows us to develop our education program in a manner which addresses the needs of our students and provides sustainable, predictable funding through our partnership with Canada.

Ivan Augustine, Director of Education, Elsipogtog First Nation Education Authority Inc.

The Government of Canada is also working closely with Indigenous partners to improve existing educational and pre-employment programs, which may contribute to safety. This includes close collaboration, by Indigenous Services Canada, with First Nations. Between 2016 and 2018, Indigenous Services Canada worked closely with First Nations to fundamentally transform funding for First Nations elementary and secondary schools on reserve. On April 1, 2019, the new funding approach was launched so that students in First Nations elementary and secondary schools on reserve are supported by funding that is comparable to funding in provincial education systems with additional funding to support language and cultural programming and full-day kindergarten. Since the launch of a new funding approach in 2019, Indigenous Services Canada has contributed eight Regional Education Agreements (REAs) while approximately 64 First Nation organizations across Canada are either participating at a regional technical table or are engaged in REA discussions. Budget 2021 announced additional funding for elementary and secondary education for First Nations on reserve, including support for refining interim regional funding formulas in critical areas such as student transportation; ensuring funding for First Nations schools remains predictable from year to year; and increasing First Nations control over First Nations education by developing and concluding more REAs. Funding was also announced in 2021-22 to support education for First Nations adults on reserve, including Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Additional funding under the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (FNIYES) provided by the 2020 Fall Economic Statement for 2021-2022 has also been implemented to support both the FNIYES and a one-year pilot partnership between Indigenous Services Canada's Income Assistance and FNIYES programs (the IA/FNYES Pilot). The FNIYES supports initiatives that provide First Nations and Inuit students and youth aged 15-30 with work experience by providing incentives and supports to employers to hire and retain First Nations youth on reserve and Inuit youth outside of land-claim areas.

However, the work that has occurred throughout 2021-22 is only a beginning, with much more to come. In addition to the information provided in the tables on 2022-23, we invite you to consult the Looking Forward section for more information on new investments to support our commitment.

Federal Pathway Updates

The table below provides key updates on the status of progress for each initiative:

Initiative Update on 2021-22 Update on Engagement Calls for Justice/Calls for Miskotahâ

Expanding access to adult education for First Nations on reserve

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $350M/5 years (2022-23 to 2026-27)

Description: Helping close the education attainment gap by expanding access to adult education for First Nations. Through this investment, First Nations will be better equipped to support adult community members to return to school and complete or upgrade their secondary education credentials.

Calls for Justice: 1.1, 4.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Indigenous Services Canada will work with First Nations partners on the development of a proposed approach for Budget 2021's investment in adult education.

Update on 2021-22:

Budget 2021 announced an investment of $350M/5 years (2022-23 to 2026-27).

Indigenous Services Canada is currently engaging with Indigenous partners through regional offices existing relationships with First nations recipients and with the Assembly of First Nations to develop the proposed approach for adult education implementation.

Engagement will continue into 2022/23.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The funding for this initiative will be rolled out to First Nations recipients.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The partners for engagement on this initiative are the Assembly of First Nations, First Nations on reserve and self-governing and modern treaty First Nations.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 1.1 and 4.4 which are oriented towards equitable access to education, training and economic opportunities for Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people through better access to education for First Nations on reserve.

Comprehensive Violence Prevention Strategy

Lead Department(s): Indigenous Services Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Funding: $724.1M/5 years and $96.6M ongoing (FES 2020)

Description: Expanding access to culturally relevant supports for Indigenous women, children, 2SLGBTQQIA+ people facing gender-based violence. This strategy will support new shelters and transition housing for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples across the country, including on reserve, in the North, and in urban areas.

Calls for Justice: 1.8, 3.4, 7.3, 16.29, 17.20, 17.23

Calls for Miskotahâ: 19, 23, 25

Planned for 2021-22:

A Call for Proposals for violence prevention projects to be launched by Indigenous Services Canada in 2021 to expand culturally relevant supports for Indigenous Peoples facing gender-based violence.

The Indigenous Shelter and Transition Housing Initiative will be launched by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation in 2021 to expand the network of shelters and transition homes.

CMHC and Indigenous Services Canada planned to work with Indigenous organizations and subject matter experts to further develop the evaluation process and the selection of projects.

The review of applications would be ongoing and the selection of eligible applications will be conducted in phases twice a year at a minimum.

Indigenous Shelter and Transitional Housing Initiative

Update on 2021-22:

The Indigenous Shelter and Transitional Housing Initiative was launched in November 2021 to support the construction of a minimum of 38 shelters and 50 transitional homes across Canada. Shelters and Transitional housing will be for Indigenous women, children and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people facing gender-based violence.

The review of applications is ongoing and the selection of eligible applications will be conducted in phases twice a year at a minimum. Depending on the number of projects selected during each phase and available funding, it is expected that applications will continue to be accepted up until end of fiscal 2023/2024.

In 2021-22, CMHC and ISC formed committees that are supporting the review and evaluation of eligible applications. Input and participation was sought from representatives of National Indigenous women's organizations, including First Nations, Inuit, Métis, Indigenous 2SLGBTQQIA+ and urban communities, as well as subject matter experts and persons with lived experience of shelter and/or transitional housing needs.

Indigenous Services Canada launched a call for proposals to fund culturally relevant supports for Indigenous Peoples facing gender-based violence.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Depending on the number of projects selected during each phase and available funding, it is expected that applications for the Indigenous Shelter and Transitional Housing Initiative will continue to be accepted up until the end of fiscal 2023/2024.

Indigenous Services Canada expects to launch a Call for Proposals in 2022-23 to fund violence prevention activities to further expand culturally relevant supports for Indigenous Peoples facing gender-based violence.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Partnership and engagement is being sought from Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak, Assembly of First Nations' Women's Council, the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence, the National Family and Survivors Circle, Urban partners, 2SLGBTQQIA+ partners, and others.

This initiative directly responds to calls for safe spaces, shelters, transition homes, second stage housing, and services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people who are fleeing violence or have been subjected to sexualized violence and exploitation through Calls for Justice 1.8, 3.4, 7.3, 16.29, 17.20, and 17.23 and Calls for Miskotahâ 19, 23, and 25.

Increasing access to employment and skills development for First Nations and Inuit youth

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada, Employment and Social Development Canada

Funding:

  1. $80.1M/1 year (2021-22) (FES 2020); and
  2. $28.8M/1 year (2022-23) (B21)

Description: Under the First Nation and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy, supporting initiatives that provide First Nations and Inuit students and youth aged 15-30 with work experience by providing incentives and supports to employers to hire and retain First Nations youth on reserve and Inuit youth outside of land-claim areas.

Calls for Justice: 1.1, 4.4, 16.21

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Additional funding for the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (FNIYES) provided by the 2020 FES for 2021-2022 to be implemented.

Update on 2021-22:

Additional funding for the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (FNIYES) provided by the 2020 FES for 2021-2022 has been implemented to support both the FNIYES and s a one-year pilot partnership between ISC's Income Assistance and FNIYES programs (the IA/FNYES Pilot).

It is estimated that approximately 374 recipient organizations will have accessed FNIYES funding by March 31, 2022.

The number of recipient organizations and youth reached will be updated in subsequent progress reports.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Additional funding for the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy announced in Budget 2021, will be implemented in the 2022-2023.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The partners are Employment and Social Development Canada, and First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy recipients and participants and Income Assistance recipients and participants.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 1.1 and 4.4 in the area of increased employment and skills training opportunities for First Nations youth on reserve, as well as Inuit youth living outside of their land claim areas. It further supports Call for Justice 16.21 by providing equitable access to economic activities, including increased employment and skills training opportunities for Inuit women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people. The FNIYES program supports this call in the area of increased employment and skills training opportunities for Inuit youth living outside of their land claim areas.

Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative and Northern and Indigenous Crime Prevention Fund

Lead Department(s): Public Safety Canada

Funding: $6.27 (FES 2020) + 64.6M/5 years (B2021) and $18.1M ongoing

Description: Expanding access to the Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative (ACSPI) and increasing resources under the Northern and Indigenous Crime Prevention Fund (NICPF), one of the four programs of the National Crime Prevention Strategy, to further support project implementation. These programs deliver community-led, Indigenous designed planning programs that support the development of community safety plans (CSP) and the implementation of community-led crime prevention initiatives with Indigenous communities across the country. A CSP is an expression of community-identified safety challenges and includes actionable solutions which have been developed through a facilitated, strengths-based process led by community members, community leadership, local service providers, and other partners identified by the community.

With these resources, these programs will continue to help build the capacity of Indigenous communities to exert greater self-determination in the area of community safety and increase access to community safety programs for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities on reserve, in the North, and in urban areas.

Calls for Justice: 3.4, 3.5, 5.4, 5.4.i, 5.4.ii, 5.5, 5.5iv

Calls for Miskotahâ: 8, 23, 62

Planned for 2021-22:

  • April 2021: Implementation of virtual delivery of Community Safety Planning process
  • February-March 2022: Initial development of framework for formal partnership arrangements with selected partners
  • April-December 2022: Engagement, development and approval of partnership arrangements with selected partners
  • Ongoing: Indigenous community engagement, Community Safety Plan development, and partnership development

Update on 2021-22:

In the 2021/2022 fiscal year, Public Safety supported eight communities in various stages of Community Safety Planning (two completed). Targeted outreach to 186 Indigenous communities was conducted, resulting in 10-15 communities ready to engage in CSP development. Communities having completed a CSP in previous years were contacted and invited to submit proposals to implement components of their CSP. ACSPI will continue to engage with Indigenous communities.

The initiative is also expanding outreach and engagement efforts to address current gaps in participation in various jurisdictions, including with Inuit and Métis communities.

The ACSPI developed virtual engagement and participation tools and processes to support community proposal development. Program officers adapted engagement and workshop content for virtual delivery and communicate with communities by telephone where video conferencing is not feasible.

The first framework was drafted and the ACSPI is engaging with its initial cohort of partners. The ACSPI is aligning existing tools and establishing processes that assist communities in developing, implementing and monitoring actions from their CSPs. This includes progress measurement, as well as the provision of additional supports, such as fostering Indigenous communities of practice and guidance on funding opportunities from government and non-government sources. In addition, PS seeks collaboration and harmonization with other federal comprehensive community-based initiatives at both the regional and national level, including engagement at the senior management level.

Coming up in 2022-23:

From April 2022 to December 2022 engagement, development, and approval of partnership arrangements with select partners will be completed.

Implementation of community-led crime prevention initiatives funded through the National Crime Prevention Strategy's NICPF.

National and Regional/community-based partners:

  • Public Safety Regional Offices;
  • Federal, Provincial and Territorial government departments responsible for community safety and wellbeing;
  • Canadian universities, educational institutions/boards of education, and Centres of excellence;
  • Indigenous communities and organizations; and,
  • Local governments and service providers.

This initiative supports Call for Justice 3.4 through support for Indigenous community-led (health) services, including (but not limited to) addiction and trauma treatment programs. It also support Call for Justice 3.5 for culturally competent, community-led responses to safety priorities identified in Community Safety Plans. The ACSPI program, in particular, also supports Call for Justice 5.5iv through community-led initiatives that address community needs.

This initiative also supports Call for Miskotahâ 8 through community-led strategies to eliminate social and economic barriers that create disparities among Indigenous Peoples, including Métis women as well as Call for Miskotahâ 23, in funding community-led, culturally-based programs and services to Indigenous Peoples, including Métis women and children. In doing so, it also supports Call for Miskotahâ 62 through community-based reconciliation activities to promote safe Indigenous communities.

Reaching Home: Canada's Homelessness Strategy

Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

Funding: IC: Additional $299.4M in 2021-2022 (COVID-specific); $567M over two years, beginning in 2022-2023 (to sustain response and prevent further inflows into homelessness)

Description: Reaching Home: Canada's Homelessness Strategy is a community-based program aimed at preventing and reducing homelessness for all, including for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Under Reaching Home, communities are provided resources to implement an outcomes-based approach, providing them with flexibility to address local priorities by investing in a range of interventions, including programming designed to meet the needs of vulnerable populations (e.g. women experiencing violence, people fleeing family violence, Indigenous people, the 2SLGBTQQIA+ communities, etc.).

Providing emergency funding to Reaching Home Community Entities in order to maintain services to prevent and reduce homelessness and reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Calls for Justice: 4.1, 4.7, 12.4, 16.1, 16.18, 16.19, 18.25

Calls for Miskotahâ: 8, 18, 23, 25, 26

Planned for 2021-22:

  • March 2021: Funding confirmed.
  • June 2021: Royal Assent received through Bill C-34 (An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2022).
  • July 2021: Funding delivered to most Reaching Home community partners as amendments to their existing agreements.

Update on 2021-22:

In fiscal year 2021-22, Reaching Home provided $92,098,509 in funding to 24 organizations to support community-based approaches to Urban, Rural, and Remote Indigenous homelessness. Of these, 18 were Indigenous-led organizations, with an additional 3 Indigenous organizations being supported to take over funding in their communities by the end of 2021-22.

An additional $9,790,408 in funding was allocated to 22 Modern Treaty Holders to support diverse projects specific to the community's needs – from client support services to capital projects.

In addition, three National Indigenous organizations are funded under Reaching Home to support distinctions-based approaches to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit homelessness across Canada.

In May 2021, a Call for Concepts was launched under the Community Capacity and Innovation stream. Of the three priority areas for the Call for Concepts, one was interventions for specific sub-populations (youth, seniors, Indigenous people, 2SLGBTQQIA+ women, veterans, Black and racialized people, persons with disabilities). Concepts that addressed the needs of Indigenous communities and/or communities in the Territories were weighted higher in the evaluation criteria during assessment.

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • April 2022: New funding begins to flow to Reaching Home community partners.
  • Summer 2022: Results of the funding are collected as part of an annual reporting exercise.

National partners:

  • Provincial and territorial governments,
  • National Indigenous Homelessness Council,
  • National Indigenous Organizations (Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami) and their affiliated organizations; and,
  • Other partners within the housing and homelessness sectors

Regional and community-based partners:

  • Reaching Home Community Entities and Community Advisory Boards (includes 37 communities and regions across Canada under the Indigenous Homelessness stream),
  • Modern Treaty Holders with provisions in their treaties related to the delivery of social services
  • Other partners within the housing and homelessness sectors

This initiatives supports calls oriented towards supporting Indigenous partners to co-develop distinctions-based plans to address critical Infrastructure gaps and to improve socio-economic conditions to provide an opportunity for a good life and a safe, stable environment for Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. It links to Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.7 and 12.4 by providing dedicated funding to support culturally-appropriate services that seek to prevent and reduce Indigenous homelessness. It also supports Call for Justice 16.1 by working with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Nunavut Government, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and other Regions of Inuit Nunangat, and Calls for Justice 16.18 and 16.19 by providing funding for housing and homelessness supports in Inuit Nunangat. Finally, the program supports Call for Justice 18.25 through dedicated funding to support culturally-appropriate services that seek to prevent and reduce Indigenous homelessness.

In addition, this program supports Calls for Miskotahâ 8, 18, 23, 25 and 26 by providing distinctions-based funding to Métis partners to address homelessness.

The National Housing Strategy, led by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, is a suite of initiatives that includes:

  • Rapid Housing Initiative

    Funding: $1.5B/ 1 year

    Description: The Rapid Housing Initiative in 2021-22 will help to address the urgent housing needs of vulnerable Canadians by providing them with adequate affordable housing in short order.

  • National Housing Co-Investment Fund

    Funding: Reallocation of $1.3B in the National Housing Co-Investment Fund is to further offer subsidies and additional contribution for construction, repair and support of affordable housing units, and includes: $250 million from 2021/2022 to 2022/2023 for transitional housing units and shelter beds for women and their children fleeing gender-based violence.

    Description: The National Housing Co-Investment Fund supports new construction, repair and renewal of affordable housing, shelters and transitional housing. It promotes mixed-income and mixed-use housing that is well-located and creates safe and inclusive communities. It prioritizes project funding for vulnerable populations, including women fleeing domestic violence.

  • Canada Housing Benefit

    Funding: $315.4M/7 years

    Description: The Canada Housing Benefit will increase direct financial assistance for people in low-income situations to help with their rent payments.

Calls for Justice: 4.1, 4.6, 12.4, 16.19, 18.25

Calls for Miskotahâ: 25, 26

Planned for 2021-22:

From Budget 2021, funding reallocation for the Rapid Housing Initiative, Canada Housing Benefit, Federal Community Housing Initiative and National Housing Co-Investment Fund was announced in 2021.

As an example, some existing funding under the National Housing Co-Investment Fund funding was reallocated to speed up the construction, repair, or support of affordable housing units. This will help families, young people, low-income Canadians, people experiencing homelessness, and women and children fleeing violence find a safe and affordable place to call home.

Update on 2021-22:

As of December 31, 2021, since its launch in 2017, the NHS has committed an estimated $7.1 billion towards meeting the housing needs of women and their children, which includes funding for the construction, repair and support of approximately 340,000 housing units. This includes funding committed and spent under the National Housing Co-Investment Fund, Rental Construction Financing Initiative, Federal Lands Initiative, Affordable Housing Innovation Fund, Rapid Housing Initiative, Federal Community Housing Initiative, Canada Community Housing Initiative, Community Housing Transformation Centre and Research and Data Initiative, as well as funding spent under legacy agreements to support community.

More specifically and in 2021-22, the Rapid Housing Initiative, Phase 2, saw CMHC commit close to $1.5 billion to support the creation of over 5,400 new affordable units. Of these units, over 2,400 are for Indigenous Peoples.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Ongoing collaboration through regional representatives with proponents sectors/regions, partners for the Rapid Housing Initiative and the National Housing Co-Investment Fund.

For the Canada Housing Benefit and Federal Community Housing Initiative funding will continue to flow through agreements.

National partners: CMHC offers programs and initiatives of national application. To raise awareness, CMHC proactively engages several partners, including the following:

  • Provincial and territorial governments
  • National Indigenous Organizations, and their affiliated organizations.

Regional and community-based partners: Indigenous governments and organizations, non-profit organizations, municipal governments, among others.

Through CMHC there are regional representatives that have relationships with provincial and territorial governments, National Indigenous organizations, and their affiliated organizations, public and private sector, and other partners within the housing and homelessness sectors in order to facilitate access to NHS initiatives.

Budget 2021 announcements for initiatives under the National housing Strategy as well as overall National Housing Strategy initiative support Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.6, 4.7 12.4, 16.18 and 18.25 and Calls for Miskotahâ 25 and 26. These investments help to improve the housing conditions of all Canadians by increasing housing supply and availability, including for Indigenous women and girls. The Rapid Housing Initiative (RHI) in particular is intended to help address urgent housing needs of vulnerable Canadians, especially in the context of COVID-19, through the rapid construction of affordable housing. The RHI takes a human rights-based approach to housing, serving people experiencing or at risk of homelessness and other vulnerable people under the NHS, including: women and children fleeing domestic violence, seniors, young adults, Indigenous Peoples, people with disabilities, people experiencing mental health and addiction issues, veterans, LGBTQ2 individuals, racialized groups, and recent immigrants or refugees.

In addition, the establishment of 12 shelters directly speaks to Calls for Justice 4.7 and 16.19 by addressing Indigenous women, children and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people's challenges and barriers to shelters. For those who experience violence, a shelter is often a first step to rebuilding their lives and protecting them from further violence. In 2021, recipients were selected for the construction and ongoing operational support of 12 new shelters across Canada for Indigenous women, children, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people escaping family violence. For more information please see: Shelters initiative for Indigenous women and children

Expand community reintegration supports for Indigenous women who are offenders

Lead Department: Correctional Service of Canada

Description: Distributing funding for Indigenous reintegration services. This program will expand CSC's community reintegration supports for federally-sentenced Indigenous women.

Calls for Justice: 14.6, 14.9

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

For 2021-2022, the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) will launch the contribution-based stream of funding in support of community reintegration efforts for Indigenous offenders. Special consideration will be given to applications proposing projects serving populations for which CSC has identified a lack of reintegration services. This includes, but is not limited to, women offenders. The program is designed to ramp up in spending over 4 years to a total of $1.5 million annually.

Update on 2021-22:

This Contribution Program will now launch in 2022-23. It will be an opportunity for CSC to distribute funding to the Indigenous governing bodies and organizations developing and/or delivering services to improve correctional results for Indigenous offenders, addressing the overrepresentation of Indigenous offenders in the system, creating safer communities and strengthening community partnerships.

Coming up in 2022-23:

On-going collaboration with CSC sectors/regions, partners (e.g. National Indigenous Organizations) and advisory bodies such as the National Indigenous Advisory Committee (NIAC) to ensure continued reintegration support for Indigenous women. A total of 600k in contributions for 2022-2023 has been made available for reintegration services for Indigenous Offenders, inclusive of Woman Offenders, involving the delivery of trauma and problematic substance use interventions, programs that address gang disaffiliation, and life skills interventions.

National and Regional/community-based partners: CSC sectors/regions, partners (e.g. National Indigenous Organizations) and advisory bodies such as the National Indigenous Advisory Committee (NIAC)

The Contribution Program aids in addressing Calls to Justice 14.6 and 14.9 by funding needs-based reintegration support for Indigenous offenders. Due to their expertise and lived-experiences, Indigenous organizations and governing bodies, who are the target recipients for this Contribution Program, are best suited to provide culturally-safe reintegration services and respond to the needs of Indigenous offenders, including and section 81 section 84 release planning.

By funding projects that are made by and for the Indigenous community, services will better address needs that are identified by the community. Ultimately, this will enhance CSC's capacity to support the successful reintegration of Indigenous offenders and will increase the participation of Indigenous communities in responding to the needs of Indigenous offenders, while developing solutions that address their own community safety needs.

Explore accommodation options to support Indigenous Women Offenders

Lead Department: Correctional Service of Canada

Funding: Funding for new partnerships or the expansion of existing contracts are analysed on an annual basis. Funding requirements would be obtained via CSC's existing mechanisms.

Description: For federally sentenced women offenders, CSC currently operates Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge in conjunction with the Nekaneet First Nation in Saskatchewan. As well, CSC has entered into partnerships with Indigenous community organizations under Section 81 of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act. In September 2011, CSC and the Native Counselling Services of Alberta collaborated on the opening of Buffalo Sage Wellness House in Edmonton Alberta. Additionally, in July 2019, CSC signed an agreement with the Indigenous Women's Healing Centre's Eagle Women's Lodge in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Potential establishment of new Section 81 Healing Lodge capacity would include collaboration with an Indigenous community or communities. CSC will also explore expanding the number of beds in contracted community-based residential facilities that can offer culturally responsive services to Indigenous women.

Calls for Justice: 14.1, 14.8

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Development of five-year Section 81 Strategy. The Strategy will include: outreach, analysis of current needs (e.g. geographic) and resource considerations.
  • Completion of an in-depth analysis of indicators that have an impact on the community population numbers and how the pandemic has impacted population flows. Specific population profiles requiring accommodation will be assessed against available capacity to identify potential gaps in beds and services.

Update on 2021-22:

Although there have been some delays, CSC remains committed to developing a five-year Section 81 Strategy that will also address challenges of existing section 81 Healing Lodges.

In addition, in 2021-22, CSC explored the need to expand contracts with community-based residential facilities that can offer culturally responsive services to Indigenous women. In 2021-2022, CSC received two proposals to open new facilities in the Prairie and Ontario regions. In the first case, Edmonton, Alberta reported a need for treatment beds in the urban area for Indigenous offenders. As such, CSC entered into a contract for nine (9) co-ed treatment beds. These beds will be used in cases where an offender's risk has increased and alternatives to suspension or revocation of their parole are sought. The second, Ontario-based proposal, is in the Toronto area. Working with an Indigenous organization, CSC was able to initiate a contract in 2021-2022 for two (2) beds in a Healing Lodge. These beds will be a welcomed addition for women being released in the Ontario Region due to its proximity to Grand Valley Institution for Women.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In 2022-23, CSC will pursue its ongoing efforts for development of a five-year Section 81 Strategy and address ongoing challenges of existing section 81 Healing Lodges.

In addition, CSC will also continue its consultations with Indigenous organizations and community partners to obtain culturally situated advice on the implementation of Bill C-15: An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and through self-government agreements. Specifically, with passing of Bill C-15, CSC must begin the process to understand how its policies and structures align with UNDRIP. The National Indigenous Advisory Committee (NIAC) will continue to be consulted to ensure future negotiations and agreements are informed by the experiences of Indigenous people and survivors and to identify and eliminate barriers to the creation of additional capacity at healing lodges within the federal correctional system.

National partners: For the development of a five year Section 81 Strategy, the partners are Indigenous leaders and organizations, other federal government departments.

For the analysis of indicators the partners are internal Correctional Service of Canada partners.

Regional and community-based partners: Internal partners include district directors, who are responsible for community corrections operations across the country. Based on the needs / gaps identified, community-based partners who can provide services will need to be identified.

The milestone of developing a five year section 81 strategy will address Call to Justice 14.1 by expanding the utilization of section 81 agreements. Enhancing capacity within Healing Lodges to provide appropriate and effective interventions focused on transition to the community and preparation of Indigenous persons for release remains a priority for CSC.

CSC recognizes that there continues to be a need for additional healing lodge capacity for Indigenous federally-sentenced persons, particularly in under-served geographies in the eastern and northern regions of Canada. While healing lodges in the western regions are open to all federally-sentenced men or women, irrespectively of their home communities, the challenges of relocating to distant provinces and the loss of connection to family, community, language and culture present significant barriers to successful community reintegration. CSC is exploring options to address the pressing need for greater healing lodge capacity, including opportunities for supplementary funding. CSC continues to reach out to Indigenous leaders and organizations, as well as horizontal partners in the federal government to identify potential partners for this endeavour.

Safe and accessible transportation options in rural, remote and northern communities – FES 2020

Lead Department: Transport Canada/VIA Rail Canada Inc.

Funding: $188M/2020-2021 for VIA Rail Canada Inc. to cover operating shortfalls in 2020-21 resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic (Fall Economic Statement 2020). This funding is in addition to continual funding for provision of mandatory passenger rail services.

Description: Offers subsidized regional routes in order to ensure a continuation of service. Offered at affordable fares with 33% discount off the full base fare for any of its routes for Indigenous peoples.

Calls for Justice: 4.8, 17.9

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

To cover operating shortfalls in 2020-21 and 2021-22 resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, this funding is in addition to continual funding for provision of mandatory passenger rail services to remote communities.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021 VIA Rail operated 3.6 million train miles and carried 1.5 million passengers overall.

VIA Rail provides passenger rail service in several rural and remote regions across Canada, where alternative, year-round transportation is limited or unavailable. The following routes carried the corresponding number of passengers in 2021; 3,387 passengers travelled between Jasper and Prince Rupert; 16,939 passengers on Winnipeg to Churchill; 2,468 passengers between Sudbury and White River; 2,769 passengers on Montreal to Senneterre; and 4,128 passengers between Montreal and Jonquiere.

National and Regional/community-based partners: VIA Rail Canada Inc.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 4.8 and 17.9, which are oriented towards the provision and continuation of safe and affordable transit and transportation services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people living in remote or rural communities.

Through this initiative, VIA Rail can continue offering subsidized rural and regional routes and offer affordable fares with 33% discount off the full base fare for any of its routes for Indigenous peoples during the COVID-19 pandemic recovery.

Safe and accessible transportation options in rural, remote and northern communities – B2021

Lead Department: Transport Canada

Funding: $43M/3 years (Budget 2021)

Description: Funding proposed for Transport Canada to continue the Remote Passenger Rail Program, which supports the provision of passenger rail service to certain remote communities with no alternative means of surface transportation.

Calls for Justice: 4.8, 17.9

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Funding of the Remote Passenger Rail Program between Sept-Iles and Schefferville in Quebec and The Pas and Pukatawagan in Manitoba.

Update on 2021-22:

Through this initiative, program recipients have maintained sufficient financial capacity to continue to provide remote passenger rail services between Sept-Iles and Schefferville in Quebec and The Pas and Pukatawagan in Manitoba.

In 2019-20, 87 round trips occurred between Sept-Iles and Schefferville and in-between communities, 104 between The Pas and Pukatawagan and in-between communities.

5 major remote communities continue to be serviced including:

  • TFT: la nation Innue Matimekush-Lac John et, la nation Naskapie de Kawawachikamach
  • KRC: Tataskweyak Cree Nation, War Lake First nation, Mathias Coulomb Cree nation

Coming up in 2022-23:

Continued funding of the Remote Passenger Rail Program between Sept-Iles and Schefferville in Quebec and The Pas and Pukatawagan in Manitoba.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Keewatin Rail Company and Tshiuetin Rail Transportation (Indigenous Passenger Rail Services Providers)

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 4.8 and 17.9 which oriented towards the provision of funding for safe and affordable transit and transportation services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people living in remote or rural communities.

Accessible transportation services for fly-in, northern, and remote communities

Lead Department: Transport Canada

Funding: $174.3/ 3 years

Description: To ensure Canada's remote communities continue to receive air services for access to essential goods and services through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Calls for Justice: 4.8, 17.9

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Ensure a minimum level of essential air service to Canada's remote communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Update on 2021-22:

The Remote Air Services Program, through which the funding was allocated, ended on March 31, 2022. A total of $146.6 million was approved and allocated for essential air services to remote communities over the 3 phases of the program from July 2020 to March 31, 2022, based on the recovery of passenger volumes reported by the air carriers in comparison to 2019 pre-pandemic levels.

Over the first two phases of the Program, from July 2020 to June 2021, jurisdictions reported that up to 142 remote communities, continued to have access to air services, upon which they were dependent, to receive essential goods and services such as the delivery of supplies and food, essential travel for medical needs or for critical personnel to remote work sites, as well as passenger transportation. The majority of these communities are isolated and only accessible by air for most of the year, where alternative means of travel for essential needs (e.g., medical visits and personnel, food, first responders, or laboratory samples) are non-existent, impossible, or impractical. Some communities may have limited access to seasonal ice roads or long and unreliable gravel roads, ferries, or remote railway. Some communities also did not have scheduled service and were resupplied through other means. These communities are largely but not exclusively composed of Indigenous people, and located throughout Canada, including Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, Yukon Territory, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.

Reporting on the effectiveness of the funding to enable continued access to essential air services during Phase 3, between July 2021 and March 2022, has not yet been received from the jurisdictions.

National partners: Provinces and Territories

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 4.8 and 17.9 which oriented towards the provision of funding for safe and affordable transit and transportation services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people living in remote or rural communities. Through this initiative, the air carriers, as the ultimate recipients of the funding, can maintain sufficient financial capacity to continue to provide essential regular air services to Canada's remote communities.

Pathways to Safe Indigenous Communities Initiative

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $103.8M/5 years

Description: The Pathways to Safe Indigenous Communities Initiative will assist First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities and partners (on- and off-reserve) to implement Indigenous designed programs, interventions and services to improve community safety and well-being. It will support Indigenous definitions of safe, secure and resilient communities and will allow for greater community control, innovation and alternative approaches that recognize the importance of traditional knowledge and practices, as well as a role for professionals, other than law enforcement, in contributing to greater community safety and well-being. The Pathways Initiative will also specifically support programs, services and interventions that address existing and emerging needs relating to the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People.

Calls for Justice: 5.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: 23, 62

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Summer 2021: engagement with Indigenous partners and ISC regional offices on program design and project identification
  • December 2021: Confirmation of funding and finalization of the Terms and Conditions
  • Launch of Pathways to Safe Indigenous Communities Initiative

Update on 2021-22:

In fiscal year 2021-2022, the Pathways Initiative provided $1.47 million in funding to six community safety and well-being initiatives. Recipients included 3 partner organizations (regional and national), and three First Nations. Individual projects will support: a community safety and wellness program that increases access to Cree cultural and land-based activities; enhance lawmaking capacity to support development of bylaws and customary laws; create an outreach worker position to support vulnerable off-reserve First Nations through wellness checks: provide after-school youth recreational and land-based programming, and, support expansion of a platform dedicated to research on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Funding continues.

National and Regional/community-based partners: ISC regional offices, First Nations, Inuit and Métis organizations and communities.

This initiative supports Call for Justice 5.4 by providing support for the self-determination of Indigenous communities to design community safety and wellbeing interventions that suit their needs.

The Pathways Initiative supports Calls for Miskotahâ 23 and 62 by assisting Métis communities and partners to implement Indigenous designed programs, interventions and services to improve community safety and well-being. It will also specifically support programs, services and interventions that address existing and emerging needs relating to the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People and will allow for greater community control, innovation and alternative approaches that recognize the importance of traditional knowledge and practices, as well as a role for professionals, other than law enforcement, in contributing to greater community safety and well-being. This initiative will also assist in better aligning existing federal safety and well-being programming and services and enable holistic horizontal/multi-sectoral approaches to be realized and implemented in communities.

Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship (IWE), with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA)

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $22M/3 years

Description: The National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) is designing and implementing the IWE which includes gender-specific and culturally appropriate tools and resources for Indigenous women to undertake entrepreneurship to build or grow a business. This financing is linked to expanding an existing initiative to offer increased support for Indigenous women entrepreneurs.

Calls for Justice: 4.2

Calls for Miskotahâ: 8

Planned for 2021-22:

Dedicated Business Support Officers will be hired at Aboriginal Financial Institutions to support women clients. Training will be developed for the Business Support Officers to ensure that they have the capacity, skills and knowledge to support Indigenous women entrepreneurs. Training and workshops will be designed and delivered for aspiring Indigenous women entrepreneurs who want to start or grow their businesses. A one-on-one grant and mentorship program and micro-loan program will be implemented to support Indigenous women start their business.

Update on 2021-22:

The IWE initiative was designed, and is administered, by the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA). NACCA is an umbrella organization for a cross-country network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFIs). It also has a working relationship with five Métis Capital Corporations (MCCs). AFIs and MCCs are developmental lenders that offer financing to qualified Indigenous entrepreneurs. The IWE is offered through these Indigenous lenders. NACCA is continuing their active outreach to AFIs and MCCs to ensure that they are aware of the IWE Initiative and programming. Any AFI or MCC can contact NACCA and can apply to participate at any point.

First Nations women, status and non-status living on or off-reserve, Métis women and Inuit women are all eligible for the IWE.

NACCA has provided preliminary data which shows that 32 applications have already been received. Furthermore, AFIs have begun to hire and train Business Support Officers but the exact number is not yet available. AFIs have also committed $4.2 million of their own funds to the micro loan fund.

The IWE has not yet begun to report on their outputs for 2021-22. The first data will come to Indigenous Services Canada from NACCA in summer or early fall of 2022. The report is expected to identify the number of workshops and number of Indigenous women participants; the number of grants and number of micro-loans provided to Indigenous women entrepreneurs. The IWE will report on the percentage of Indigenous women entrepreneurs accessing financing through AFIs and MCCs by 2025.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Year 1 activities (training, workshops, mentorships and micro-loans) will continue through year 2. Training designed for dedicated Business Support Officers in year 1 will be delivered in years 2 and 3. The IWE will continue to host workshops for Indigenous women entrepreneurs and virtual regional and national peer mentorship circles, issue micro-loans and conduct training and information on a variety of topics to support Indigenous women.

Workshops and training sessions have been planned covering a range of topics including writing business proposals and application training, management and organization tools and computer training. 125 workshops are targeted to be delivered over the next fiscal year.

In addition, the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship program is undergoing both an ISC evaluation and extensive consultations with Indigenous partners in 2022-23 in preparation for a program re-design.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship initiative is led by the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA). Over the past 30+ years, NACCA has established itself as a long-standing, trusted partner of Canada. In 2015, as part of the effort to devolve programming to Indigenous partners, NACCA assumed operation of the entire Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program (AEP). Until the recent shift towards distinctions-based delivery, NACCA distributed all AEP program funding to Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI) and Métis Capital Corporations (MCC). Since 2019, the MCCs deliver their share of the program. The IWE initiative is administered through NACCA, and as such NACCA will be continuing active outreach to AFIs and MCCs about the IWE Initiative and programming. They are planning additional promotion activities that will communicate IWE programming to Indigenous women across Canada. Any AFI or MCC can contact NACCA and can apply to participate at any point.

The IWE and AEP provide Indigenous women with a path to entrepreneurship and so address Call for Justice 4.2 which asks governments to uphold the rights of Indigenous women and girls to have services and infrastructure that meet their social and economic needs. They also address Call for Miskotahâ 8 which requires action on the part of the federal (and provincial) government to eliminate the social and economic barriers that create disparities between Métis women and other women in Canada.

Bolstering the Capacity of Indigenous Women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ Organizations

Lead Department: Women and Gender Equality Canada

Funding: $55M/5 years

Description: Bolstering the capacity of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations to provide gender-based violence prevention programming aimed at addressing the root causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

Calls for Justice: 1.3, 1.5, 1.6

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Women and Gender Equality Canada (WAGE) launched a Call for Proposals on January 27, 2022 to bolster the capacity of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations to provide gender-based violence prevention programming aimed at addressing the root causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

Update on 2021-22:

The Call for Proposals launched on January 27, 2022, and closed on March 10, 2022. Eleven virtual information sessions have been held and approximately 150 participants attended these sessions.

Implementation of the projects is expected to start by fall 2022.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Funding continues.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The partners are Women and Gender Equality Canada's Indigenous Women's Circle, Indigenous organizations, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations that provide gender-based violence prevention programming.

Members of the Indigenous Women's Circle (IWC) come from a broad range of sectors and include First Nations, Métis, Inuit, youth and Elders, with representation coming from all parts of the country.

WAGE is also working with provinces, territories, other government departments, and Indigenous peoples (including National Indigenous Leaders and Representatives) to develop a National Action Plan to End Gender-Based Violence. This plan, once finalized will guide actions across jurisdictions, including federal, provincial and territorial governments, toward a Canada free of gender-based violence.

Additionally, since April 2020, WAGE has provided over $173M in emergency funding to support over 1,300 organizations, providing a range of GBV supports and services. Of these 1,320 organizations, a total of $21.6M in emergency funding was provided to 129 Indigenous-led and/or Indigenous-serving organizations across the country. This funding aligns with the GBV NAP and ensures the continuity of services and enhances the capacity of GBV organizations that provide critical and often life-saving services and supports for women, girls, LGBTQ2, and gender non-binary people experiencing violence.

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6 by increasing the capacity of Indigenous not-for-profit organizations to prevent or address GBV against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

Elementary and Secondary Education on Reserve – Additional Funding

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $726M/ 5 years and $188M ongoing (starting in 2021-22)

Description: Additional resources for refining the interim regional funding formulas in critical areas such as student transportation; ensuring funding for First Nations schools remains predictable from year to year; and increasing First Nations control over First Nations education by developing and concluding more regional education agreements.

Calls for Justice: 1.1, 2.3, 4.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

As part of the regular funding cycle, updates to elementary and secondary education interim regional funding formulas will be made, with these new investments starting in 2021-22.

Update on 2021-22:

The elementary and secondary education interim regional funding formulas were refined and adjusted to incorporate the funding and priorities announced in Budget 2021 during the 2021-22 fiscal year. Provincially comparable approaches were replicated for student transportation funding. A national approach for funding stabilization to ensure stable and predictable funding was also implemented for First Nation schools (ensuring any decrease is capped at 1.5%). Many refinements, some more regional in nature, were discussed and co-developed with partners around technical tables on the funding formulas.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The second year of funding will be implemented.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Engagement with First Nation partners on the implementation of these new investments are ongoing through established regional technical tables as well as the Assembly of First Nations' National Indian Education Council and the Chiefs' Committee on Education. Indigenous Services Canada will work with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada to engage with Modern Treaty Partners and self-governing and modern treaty First Nations.

This initiative supports Call for Justice 1.1 regarding equitable access to education, amongst other items, for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people through comprehensive educational supports for First Nations children on reserve. It also supports Call for Justice 2.3 related to support for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people to restore, reclaim, and revitalize their cultures and languages through a new funding approach that includes additional support for language and cultural programming for students attending First Nations operated schools. Finally, this initiative supports Call for Justice 4.4 related to access to resources, which includes education, for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people within Indigenous communities, specifically within First Nations communities.

Before- and after-school programming for First Nations students on reserve

Lead Department: Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $515M/5 years, and $112M ongoing (starting in 2021-2022)

Description: In order to provide a continuum of educational and learning supports, this funding is being implemented as an enhancement to ISC's Elementary and Secondary Education Program to support before and after-school programing for First Nations students on reserve.

Calls for Justice: 1.1, 2.3, 4.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Funding for before- and after-school programming on-reserve announced through Budget 2021 will be implemented through the existing Elementary and Secondary Education Program. Engagement with First Nations partners in year one will take place to inform the implementation approach for year two and beyond.

Update on 2021-22:

Funding for 2021-2022 has been provided through existing mechanisms, including agreements with self-governing and modern treaty partners (subject to the provisions of their agreements). Engagement with First Nations partners through regional offices in year one took place to help inform the implementation approach for year two, which resulted in an expansion of scope to First Nations attending school both on and off reserve. Engagement will continue throughout 2022-2023 and beyond to inform future years.

The scope of the funding for 2022-23 has now been increased in order to include not only the First Nation students residents on reserve who attend a First Nation administered school but now also those students who attend a provincial or private school.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Ongoing discussions with partners to take place to inform future years.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The partners are First Nations recipients funded through the Elementary and Secondary Education Program, as well as self-governing and modern treaty First Nations (subject to the provisions of their agreements).

This initiative supports Calls for Justice 1.1 and 4.4 related to government-supported, equitable access to education, amongst other items, for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people, by providing support for comprehensive educational supports for First Nations children on reserve. It also supports Call for Justice 2.3 which seeks government support for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people to restore, reclaim, and revitalize their cultures and identities. The funding for before and after school programming for First Nations students on reserve is being implemented as an enhancement to ISC's existing Elementary and Secondary Education Program, which also provides additional support for language and cultural programming for students attending First Nations operated schools.

Progress to Date: Justice

Since the release of the National Inquiry's Final Report, there has been significant action and planning underway on the part of the Government of Canada's approach to implementing initiatives related to justice. As this summary details, these initiatives and investments have worked toward supporting the implementation of key pieces of legislation and policy, on strengthening Indigenous-led community-based programs, and on building an Indigenous Justice Strategy and other related programs and initiatives for the future. Further efforts focus on better equipping those who work in justice to serve Indigenous communities and ensuring that family members and survivors have the supports they need when navigating these systems.

Federal departments responsible for actions in the justice area are focused on two parallel approaches to addressing the justice-specific findings of the National Inquiry's Final Report and related Calls for Justice, the commitments in the Federal Pathway, and the priorities raised by partners in the context of the National Action Plan: facing and addressing anti-Indigenous systemic racism and discrimination within the Canadian justice system, and, supporting the revitalization and rebuilding of Indigenous-led community-based justice alternatives. In this approach, transformational change is required to support the decolonization of the justice system, particularly in its interactions with Indigenous victims, families, accused, and offenders. Investments and initiatives that support Indigenous-led justice solutions are also key to making progress.

Altogether, these actions support the key thematic objectives from the Federal Pathway, including:

Key Highlights

  • As a first step in implementing the UN Declaration Act, Justice Canada launched a consultation and cooperation process, which includes support for Indigenous-led engagement. This step will help shape the initial draft of an action plan and identify potential measures for aligning federal laws with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
  • Justice Canada expanded the Indigenous Justice Program to provide funding to Indigenous-led community-based justice programs to provide family mediation services and expanding the Indigenous Courtwork Program to include Indigenous family court worker services to better support Indigenous families navigating the Canadian justice system.
  • Justice Canada is supporting Indigenous-led engagement to inform the development of the Indigenous Justice Strategy.
  • Public Safety has established relationships with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association and First Nations Police Governance Council (FNCPA), and set contribution agreements with AFN and FNCPA, to support the co-development of a legislative framework for First Nations policing.
  • In their work toward addressing sex-based inequalities in the Indian Act, ISC has received 45,663 applications, processed 37,438 of those applications and found 28,152 newly eligible persons.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police's 2021 Missing and Murdered Campaign, which uses social media to seek the public's help on solving cases, profiled 11 cases over 11 weeks, beginning on October 4th to coincide with the Sisters in Spirit Vigil.

Promoting Equitable Access to Justice

Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people must be supported as rights holders of inherent, constitutional, Treaty, and human rights. The Government of Canada acknowledges that more must be done to ensure that Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people can exercise their rights in the context of the justice system, particularly family members and loved ones of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. In 2021-22, initiatives implemented by the Government of Canada have sought to support the inherent rights of Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people by removing barriers to justice and providing more culturally safe, trauma-informed, justice supports for Indigenous persons navigating the Canadian justice system.

As the voice of self-administered First Nations police services in Canada, the FNCPA can draw upon unique experience and expertise that will help ensure that the proposed legislative framework will best meet the needs of both First Nations Communities and First Nations police services across Canada. The funding received through Public Safety Canada will greatly assist the association to be an active partner in the development of the proposed essential service legislation. With it the association will engage our members and police services in the areas of resource and needs assessments and bring their concerns and realties to the table.

Chief Jerel Swamp, President, First Nations Chiefs of Police Association

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Declaration) is a comprehensive international human rights instrument on the rights of Indigenous Peoples around the world. It affirms and sets out the minimum standards to protect the rights of Indigenous peoples and to contribute to their survival, dignity and well-being. The Declaration provides a framework for reconciliation, healing and peace, as well as harmonious and cooperative relations based on the principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, and non-discrimination and good faith. In June 2021, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (the UN Declaration Act) became law and created an action-orientated framework to advance the federal implementation of the Declaration in collaboration and cooperation with Indigenous peoples. The Government of Canada has started an engagement processes so that it can work in partnership with Indigenous peoples to take all measures necessary to ensure federal laws are consistent with the Declaration, to prepare and implement an action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration, and develop an annual report on progress and submit to Parliament. The action plan must include measures that address injustices, combat prejudice and eliminate all forms of violence, racism and discrimination, including systemic racism and discrimination against Indigenous peoples and Indigenous elders, youth, children, women, men, persons with disabilities and 2SLGBTQQIA+ persons. The Act is an important step forward in moving Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples forward. In addition, Indigenous Services Canada has also been working to support Indigenous women, children and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, as well as others who have been disenfranchised, to continue the implementation of former Bill S-3: Eliminating known sex-based inequities in registration which fully came into force in August 2019. The amendments now in force seek to repair a longstanding inequality that prevented descendants of Indigenous women from claiming status, even as work continues over the longer term to transition away from the Indian Act.

Support for Indigenous victims, survivors and families of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is an essential part of this work and the Government of Canada is committing to moving forward. Throughout 2021-22, Justice Canada's Federal Victims Strategy supported awareness raising, public legal education, knowledge sharing and training in support of Indigenous victims and survivors of crime, in addition to the design and delivery of specialized victim services and supports such as Family Information Liaison Units (FILUs). Established in 2016, FILUs teams across Canada continued to work together in 2021-22 to overcome the systemic and structural barriers that families of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLTBQQIA+ people face in accessing up to date, accurate information about their loved one, as well as in accessing culturally grounded supports and services to assist them in their healing journey. As noted by a family member during a FILUs evaluation, "Whether or not the outcome was good for them, the process of being able to at least try to access the information is helpful and part of that whole reconciliation piece. As well, being able to have an avenue for your voice to be heard – this is your loved one's story; this is what happened." FILUs teams have continued to evolve, filling critical gaps in service, support and assistance for families. In the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic, FILUs revised their operational practices and reallocated resources in order to better support families in this new context and took steps to reduce the impact of isolation and distancing measures on their clients.

Justice Canada is also engaging with Indigenous partners on an Indigenous Justice Strategy to address systemic racism and overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in the justice system. Collaboration with Indigenous partners began early in the Indigenous Justice Strategy development process. Justice Canada held pre-engagement meetings with Indigenous partners to discuss how best to support the Indigenous Justice Strategy. Through these discussions, partners suggested inclusion of concrete actions in the areas of crime prevention, policing and diversion, courts, corrections, and reintegration. Partners also emphasized the importance of supporting the revitalization of Indigenous justice systems, self-determination, and Criminal Code reforms. Pre-engagement was followed by a Call for Proposals that has allocated $11 million to Indigenous partners and organizations, including communities, to engage their members on what an Indigenous Justice Strategy in Canada should include. Alongside the Indigenous-led engagement process, the Government of Canada will undertake Justice-led engagements in partnership with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners and other stakeholders. In parallel, work continues on the development of Pan-Canadian Strategy to address the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the justice system, through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Aboriginal Justice Working Group.

In 2021-22, the Minister of Justice introduced Bill C-5, which proposes to restore judicial discretion, including by eliminating certain mandatory minimum penalties that have known negative disproportionate impacts, including on Indigenous people. The Bill would also allow for a greater use of conditional sentences in appropriate cases by removing certain restrictions to their availability. These reforms would contribute to reducing recidivism without compromising public safety, and together with the changes proposed in the Controlled Drugs and Substance Act, would bring a public-health focus to simple drug possession.

Ultimately, supporting access to justice means restoring relationships and inspiring trust. First Nations in Canada have long called for reform to how First Nations police services are funded and have advocated for federal legislation that recognizes First Nations policing as an essential service. The Government of Canada is engaging with First Nations, Provinces and Territories, First Nations organizations, First Nations police services, First Nations police boards/commissions, First Nations women's organizations, First Nations youth organizations, First Nations 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and organizations, subject matter experts and others to support the co-development of federal First Nations police services legislation. As well, the Government of Canada will undertake distinctions-based dialogues with Inuit and Métis representative organizations, Provinces and Territories, Inuit and Métis rights holders, Inuit and Métis women's organizations, Inuit and Métis youth organizations, Inuit and Métis 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and organizations, subject matter experts and others to better understand their unique policing and community safety priorities and how best they can be supported. Recognizing that immediate action is required to support policing services in First Nations and Inuit communities, the Government of Canada is also investing in the expansion and stabilization of the First Nations and Inuit Policing Program (FNIPP) to support policing services that are professional, dedicated and responsive to First Nation and Inuit communities.

The federal government is also working to improve its own capacity to engage with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities on questions of justice. Moving forward, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) will engage victims, Elders and community leaders of First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut to better understand how to increase the confidence of these groups to engage in criminal justice processes. PPSC is also hiring Inuktuk-speaking paralegals to assist with legal proceedings in Nunavut and increasing prosecutorial capacity in the territories. The increase in prosecutorial capacity will enable prosecution teams to spend as much time as necessary with victims and witnesses to establish trust and properly prepare them for the unfamiliar and traumatic court process. Recruitment efforts related to this initiative will focus on increasing Indigenous representation among the three northern regional offices, where possible.

The initiatives and investments that rolled out over the 2021-22 fiscal year are critical steps made toward ensuring that Indigenous Peoples' inherent right to justice is recognized. In addition to the information provided in the tables on 2022-23, we invite you to consult the Looking Forward section for more information on new investments to support our commitment.

Federal Pathway Updates

The table below provides key updates on the status of progress for each initiative:

Initiative Update on 2021-22 Update on Engagement Calls for Justice/Calls for Miskotahâ

Revival of the Law Commission of Canada

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $18M/5 years and $4M ongoing

Description: The Commission will be responsive to issues such as systemic racism in the justice system, legal issues around climate change, establishing a new relationship with Indigenous Peoples, and rapid technological shifts in the world.

Calls for Justice: 5.2, 5.3, 5.14, 5.17, 5.18

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Appointment of an interim Executive Director;
  • Appointment of the President;
  • Appointment of Part-time Commissioners;
  • Appointment of Secretariat staff; and,
  • Put in place necessary administrative support.

Update on 2021-22:

Work to re-establish the Commission has been ongoing throughout out fiscal 2021-22. This included work to re-establish the Secretariat and make sure the proper administrative and logistical supports are in place, and work on appointing a President and part-time Commissioners.

Hiring of Secretariat staff is expected to conclude early in 2022-23.

Coming up in 2022-23:

It is expected that the Law Commission will be up and running in fiscal 2022-23.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Once the President is in place it is expected that the Commission will start a process of consultations across many diverse groups, as well as with the Advisory Council it will establish (per the enabling statute), to help determine that research work plan.

The manner in which the Commission will address the identified Calls for Justice will depend on how the independent Law Commission structures its research plan once it is established and operational.

Depending on the decisions of the Commission with respect to what areas of law they will examine and report on, the Commission may address or recommend amendments to the Criminal Code or other legislation to address Indigenous-specific legal questions and justice issues (Calls for Justice 5.2, 5.3, 5.14, 5.17, 5.18).

Support the implementation of Gladue Principles

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $49.3M/5 years and $9.7M ongoing

Description: Supporting the implementation of Gladue Principles in the mainstream justice system and Indigenous-led responses in order to help reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice and correctional systems.

Calls for Justice: 5.11, 5.15, 5.16

Calls for Miskotahâ: 41, 42, 43

Planned for 2021-22:

The funding includes three components:

  1. Funding for Gladue Report Writing through the Indigenous Courtwork Program.
  2. Funding for Gladue Casework/Aftercare for individuals who have had a Gladue Report through the Indigenous Justice Program.
  3. Funding for projects informed by Gladue Principles that focus on educating justice professionals and changing structures, policies, practices and institutions in the criminal justice system. Funding to be delivered through the Indigenous Justice Program.

Launch and close a Call for Proposals for the project component with the funding agreements in place by the end of 2021-2022.

Develop funding proposals and implementation strategies with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners for the Gladue Report writing and aftercare.

Update on 2021-22:

Justice Canada has engaged provincial and territorial partners through regular Federal, Provincial and Territorial Working Group meetings and bilateral discussions on jurisdictional specific implementation plans. Justice Canada also has an ongoing dialogue with Indigenous community partners and service delivery agencies, and will continue to work closely with them throughout the roll-out of this initiative in the Fall of 2022.

The Call for Proposals for the project component launched in July 2021 and closed in August, 2021. 31 projects have been approved to date, with a few remaining decisions and agreements yet to be finalized. Funding agreements with Indigenous community-based recipients for Gladue Casework/Aftercare have been signed in those same jurisdictions.

In addition, Agreements with PE, NS, QC, ON, AB, BC and YT for Gladue Reports were approved by the Minister of Justice on March 28 and are in the process of being finalized.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Ongoing onboarding of jurisdictions and community partners for Gladue Reports and Aftercare.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Justice Canada has engaged provincial and territorial partners through regular Federal, Provincial and Territorial Working Group meetings and bilateral discussions on jurisdictional specific implementation plans. The Justice Canada has an ongoing dialogue with Indigenous community partners and service delivery agencies, and will continue to work closely with them throughout the roll-out of this initiative in the Fall.

This initiative responds to Call for Justice 5.15 and Calls for Miskotahâ 42 and 43 specifically by implementing funding for Gladue Report writing through the Indigenous Courtwork Program.

This initiative also responds to Calls for Justice 5.11 and 5.16 specifically by implementing additional funding for Restorative Justice programs (5.11) and community-based and Indigenous-specific options for sentencing (5.16).

Justice capacity related to Administration of Justice Agreements (AoJ)

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $8.1M/5 years

Description: Investing in the Departments capacity to engage with Indigenous groups to negotiate Administration of Justice Agreements. These agreements help to strengthening Indigenous community-based justice systems, Indigenous legal traditions, and self-determination over administration of justice at the community level.

Calls for Justice: 1.4, 1.6, 5.1, 5.4, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 5.16, 16.41, 17.27

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Internal capacity will be increased to support Administration of Justice agreement work.

Additional Justice capacity is responsible for leading AoJ negotiations through the Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-determination (RIRSD) process, which entails:

  • engaging with Indigenous groups and provinces/territories;
  • providing legal and strategic advice; briefing senior management;
  • preparing and overseeing development of documents; supporting the Justice Canada team;
  • preparing and managing comprehensive documents (reports, studies, planning documents);
  • consulting with other governments, departments, and sectors / regions; communications regarding negotiations;
  • fact finding background information and collecting documents;
  • research/analyze contextual legal and historical documents; and,
  • travel to Indigenous communities.

Update on 2021-22:

In 2021-2022, Justice Internal capacity was increased to support the negotiation of Administration of Justice (AoJ) agreements through the Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination (RIRSD) process.

In addition, dialogue with leaders and Indigenous communities through their participation in Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination Discussion tables has increased. Currently, work is ongoing on twelve tables.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The Department of Justice has fully increased its capacity to enable officials to participate at twelve tables at which potential administration of justice agreements are being discussed. These include Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada's (CIRNA) Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination discussion tables (RIRSD). Indigenous partners' participation at these tables is supported through other sources, including through CIRNA's RIRSD funding. As part of this work on a range of tables, Justice is advancing 2 draft Negotiation Mandate Proposal's setting out proposed agreements between Canada and Indigenous governing bodies that can be taken to Ministers/Indigenous leaders for approval over the next two years.

National partners: CIRNAC and other relevant departments.

Regional and community-based partners: Ongoing partnerships with negotiating communities.

The negotiations of Administration of Justice Agreements support Calls for Justice 1.4, 1.6, 5.1, 5.4, 5.9. 5.10. 5.11, 5.16, 16.41, and 17.27. AoJ agreements could impact upon Canada's advancement in its national approach for reconciliation and self-determination for Indigenous peoples and improve the Crown-Indigenous relationship. The creation of AoJ agreements will support respective communities' abilities to exercise control over this core aspect of self governance, which permeates and supports all aspects of daily life, reinforcing the strength of the community and its health and safety. A strong justice system can also assist with the development of other sectoral areas like land and financial management.

Advancing AoJ agreements will also form a key part of the development of an Indigenous Justice Strategy – a new government mandate commitment. Specifically, the development of agreements will help address systemic discrimination and the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the justice system. The engagement of the Indigenous community means that their lived experience, as well as their expertise and agency of families and survivors is drawn upon for this work. Connections are made to bring an end to the inequalities which contribute to the disproportionately high levels of violence against Indigenous women and girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples.

This work emphasizes the importance of the sharing of strengths, respects diversity and grounds activities in local Indigenous values and governance systems, rooted in land, culture, spirituality and relationships.

Consultation and cooperation on the implementation of United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration Act)

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: CIRNA/DOJ $31.5M/2 years

Description: In consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples, supporting the development of an action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration and the identification of potential measures for aligning federal laws with the Declaration. This process will support Indigenous self-determination and enhance nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationships.

Calls for Justice: 1.2v

Calls for Miskotahâ: 1, 16, 17

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Consultation and cooperation on development of an action plan;
  • Consultation and cooperation on development of a draft action plan and the identification of potential measures for ensuring the consistency of federal laws with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Declaration);
  • Development of tools and interim guidance with respect to measures to ensure the consistency of laws with the Declaration;
  • Training delivered to support public servants' understanding of the Declaration and the UN Declaration Act; and,
  • Work on legislative initiatives to meet the requirements of s. 5 of the UN Declaration Act.

Update on 2021-22:

Outputs for the 2021-22 period include the public launch, on December 10, 2021, of the engagement process to develop the initial draft of an action plan and begin to identify potential measures for aligning federal laws with the Declaration, in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples. This launch included an open call for proposals to support the participation of Indigenous peoples, organizations and groups in the engagement process, and support for Indigenous-led consultations with their citizens and members to identify priorities for the development of the action plan.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Complete development of the first annual progress report to Parliament and a draft action plan, in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples. The action plan will be tabled in Parliament in 2023-24 and implementation will subsequently commence.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Inclusive and distinctions-based engagement process with Indigenous rights holders, representative organizations and groups at the national, regional and local level. Discussions with provinces and territories and industry associations will also occur as part of the process.

Call for Justice 1.2v specifically calls on all governments, together with Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Enacting the UN Declaration Act, and collaborating with Indigenous partners to create a plan to implement the Act, directly responds to this Call for Justice including the requirement to recognize, protect, and support Indigenous self-determination and self-government.

It further supports Calls for Miskotahâ 1, 16 and 17. To this end, Justice staff have met with Métis rights holders, representative organizations, and groups representing Métis women to share information about the Call for Proposals. We anticipate that a number of these organizations will provide input in the development of the action plan.

Indigenous-led community-based programs–Program Integrity inclusive of Trauma Informed Victims Training and Civil and Family Mediation

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $13.6M/3 years (Program Integrity) and $6.8M/ 3 years (Civil and Family Mediation)

Description: Expanding support for the Indigenous Justice Program (IJP) will help maintain the availability of Indigenous-led community justice programs to provide safe and responsive Indigenous and restorative justice programming in their communities including ensuring that community justice workers are trained to support victims of violence through a trauma informed lens. The IJP supports Indigenous community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. These efforts assist Indigenous people in assuming greater responsibility of their administration of justice in their communities, reflect and include Indigenous values within the justice system, and contribute to a decreased rate of victimization, crime and incarceration among Indigenous people.

Calls for Justice: 5.6

Calls for Miskotahâ: 20, 41

Planned for 2021-22:

The Indigenous Justice Program (IJP) will provide program integrity funding to its existing Indigenous community-based programs via their funding agreements under its Community-Based Fund.

Funding for civil and family mediation will be delivered through a Call for Proposals process open to existing IJP recipients. Decisions will be made and funding included in the above mentioned funding agreements.

Update on 2021-22:

Funding agreements for program integrity and civil and family mediation funding have been finalized.

Funding for program integrity for existing IJP supported programs was included in their recently signed 5 year funding agreements. These agreements cover the federal government's contribution to the community-based justice programs run by IJP's Indigenous community partners. Program Integrity funding focussed on top-ups to existing salary, training and travel budgets. These budget increases will allow programs to continue to provide high-quality justice programming and enhance their stability.

Decisions on Civil and Family Mediation were made based on a Call for Proposals open to existing IJP supported programs for the following types of initiatives: a) capacity building and training; b) enhancing and expanding existing programming; and c) developing and testing new models. Funding was provided to 39 IJP supported programs for initiatives ending before March 31, 2024.

The approach for the development and delivery of victims training is still under development. Engagement with partners will commence in early 22-23 and funding will begin to roll out by the third quarter of 22-23.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Funding for the development and delivery of trauma-informed victims training will begin to roll out in 2022-23.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The Indigenous Justice Program will partner and engage with Provincial and Territorial delivery partners and existing Indigenous community partners. This will be done through existing working groups and bilateral discussion with Provinces and Territories and in one on one discussions with existing Indigenous recipients. Some initial information sharing was done, with more discussions to follow confirmation of funding.

This funding directly addresses Call for Justice 5.6 and Calls for Miskotahâ 20 & 41 by providing additional support to victims and culturally appropriate restorative justice programs in light of eliminating the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in custody.

Strengthen Indigenous-led community-based programs–Indigenous Family Courtwork Services (ICW)

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $6.7M/3 years

Expanding the Indigenous Courtwork (ICW) program to assist Indigenous persons who are navigating the family, child protection, and/or criminal justice systems, often simultaneously. A Court Worker will assist in navigating these proceedings including connecting clients to culturally safe assistance and resources. Over time, this expansion will lead to a reduction in the number of Indigenous children being removed permanently from their families, a key recommendation from the MMIWG Final Report. ICW also contributes to the courts understanding of Indigenous cultures, languages and traditions, reducing the instances of racism and the effects of systemic racism on Indigenous families.

Calls for Justice: 1.8, 5.11

Calls for Miskotahâ: 20, 41

Planned for 2021-22:

Funding allocations discussed and determined with the ICW Federal/Provincial/Territorial working group. Minister of Justice approved March 28, 2022.

Funding for support of Family Court Worker services delivered through existing ICW agreements with Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Update on 2021-22:

Funding agreements to support the delivery of Indigenous Family Court Worker services were approved by the Minister of Justice on March 28 for QC, ON, SK, AB and NT.

Justice Canada continues to work with remaining jurisdictions in support of Indigenous Family Court Worker services.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Ongoing discussions with remaining jurisdictions to support Family Court Worker services where needed.

Provincial, territorial and community-based partners: The Indigenous Courtwork Program will engage with Provinces, Territories and service delivery agencies to determine implementation of Family Court Worker services. This will be done through existing working groups.

This initiative responds to Calls for Justice 1.8 & 5.11, as well as Calls for Miskotahâ 20 & 41 by making additional permanent funding available for civil and family mediation in light of increasing accessibility to meaningful and culturally appropriate mediation services.

Engaging with Indigenous partners on an Indigenous Justice Strategy

Lead Department: Justice Canada

Funding: $24.2M/3 years

Description: Through a call for proposals, Justice Canada will provide $11M in funding to Indigenous partners and organizations to engage with their members and citizens on what an Indigenous Justice Strategy (IJS) in Canada could and should include. This funding aims to support engagement to inform the development of the IJS, and identify legislative, program, and policy initiatives needed to address systemic discrimination and overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the justice system.

Calls for Justice: 5.1, 5.3, 5.10, 5.11, 5.12, 5.21, 9.1, 9.2

Calls for Miskotahâ: 8, 16, 41

Planned for 2021-22:

Pre-engagement discussions with partners aim to:

  1. co-develop a mutual vision and scope for an Indigenous Justice Strategy;
  2. identify preliminary joint-priorities and gaps; and,
  3. identify potential engagement frameworks or plans.

Update on 2021-22:

Following the call for proposal process, grant letters for successful applicants to support Indigenous-led engagement were approved by the Department on March 25th, 2022.

Justice Canada continues to work with other federal government departments, provinces and territories, and Indigenous partners on the Indigenous Justice Strategy as it develops.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Indigenous-led and Justice-led engagements will take place. Funding for Indigenous-led engagement is rolling out through multi-year grant agreements.

Indigenous-led and Justice-led engagements are intended to gather input, ideas, and proposals that will inform the development of an Indigenous Justice strategy. Input is expected to identify concrete measures needed throughout the justice system continuum, social supports, and the need to revitalize Indigenous justice systems, self-determination, and Criminal Code reforms. The engagement approach under the development of the Indigenous Justice Strategy is designed to fully respect the self-determination of Indigenous groups across the country, and to take a distinctions-based approach to gathering input, ideas, and reflections on how to address this pressing justice specific issue together with Indigenous partners.

The first interim reports from Indigenous-led engagements are expected in December 2022.

In addition, ongoing work by the Federal Provincial Territorial Aboriginal Justice Working Group on the Pan-Canadian Strategy will feed into the Indigenous Justice Strategy, including building on Provincial Territorial networks with communities.

National partners and Regional/community-based partners: Partners and funding recipients for Indigenous-led engagements will be determined based on priorities identified, and applications approved through the call for proposals. Partners for Justice-led engagements will be determined based on priorities and on a regional and distinctions basis (with anticipated PT involvement).

The engagement approach under the development of the Indigenous Justice Strategy is designed to fully respect the self-determination of Indigenous groups across the country, and to take a distinctions-based approach to gathering input, ideas, and reflections on how to address this pressing justice specific issue together with Indigenous partners, therefore supporting Calls for Miskotahâ 8, 16, and 41.

This work also supports Calls for Justice 5.1, 5.3, 5.10, 5.11, 5.12, 5.21, 9.1, and 9.2, which focus on changes required within the justice system that would help address systemic racism and overrepresentation and that could be the focus of discussions under the development of an Indigenous Justice Strategy. The Strategy itself may address these calls for justice more specifically.

Address sex-based inequalities in the Indian Act through the Implementation of former Bill S-3

Lead Department(s): Indigenous Services Canada

Funding: $21.2M / 3 years (received August 2019)

Description: The implementation of S-3 has been underway since the coming into force of the legislation in 2017, introduced to address the remaining sex-based inequities in Indian registration, and will continue to be funded through 2022-23. The Department continues to recognize newly eligible individuals and continues outreach to newly eligible individuals, as well as its engagement with First Nations and monitoring of impacts.

Calls for Justice: 1.2v

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

There is ongoing engagement (outreach and monitoring of impacts) on former Bill S-3. In the fall/winter of 2021-2022 there will be an evaluation of the solutions to address residual impacts of previous sex-based inequities and remaining non sex-based inequities in Indian registration.

Update on 2021-22:

As of April 4, 2022, and since former Bill S-3 has come into force, the processing unit has achieved the following:

  • 45,663 applications received;
  • 37,438 applications processed;
  • 28,152 persons newly eligible; and,
  • 9 Trusted Source partnerships have been established with community organizations to provide access to services in an urban setting.

Trusted Source partnerships have also assisted in expediting application review. A Trusted Source is an individual, organization, or a provincial or federal department that has been designated a reliable partner of information and has been evaluated as able to assess identity information and assist clients in accessing programs and services, including registration under the Indian Act and the Secure Certificate of Indian Status.

There are 6607 files yet to be reviewed. On average, over 1600 files are processed each month.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Ongoing work on residual impacts of previous sex-based inequities and remaining non sex-based inequities. Possible consultation/engagement process.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Engagement to date has been multi-pronged, and Indigenous Services Canada has collaborated with partners named below. If the Department is granted a mandate for more outreach and engagement, the number of partners will expand.

Internal Partners:

  • Non-Insured Health Benefits,
  • Communications,
  • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, and
  • Justice Canada

External Partners:

  • Assembly of First Nations,
  • Native Women's Association of Canada,
  • Feminist Alliance for International Action,
  • Provinces and Territories, and
  • Indian Registration Administrators (IRAs) in First Nation Bands across the country.

This initiative contributes to Call for Justice 1.2v by ensuring women and their descendants (of all genders) are entitled to be registered and able to seek band membership based on the legislative changes introduced through former Bill S-3 Eliminating known sex-based inequities in registration in the Indian Act.

The initiative does not contribute to the Calls for Miskotahâ as our program serves First Nations individuals.

Co-development of First Nations police services legislation and Engagement on Inuit and Métis policing and community safety priorities

Lead Department(s): Public Safety Canada, Indigenous Services Canada, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Relations Canada

Funding: PS: $36.1M/5 years; ISC: $7.6M/5 years

Description: Co-developing and tabling federal legislation that recognizes First Nations police services as essential services. To advance this mandate commitment, targeted and meaningful engagement activities are being planned with First Nations organizations, rights holders, provinces and territories, relevant policing organizations and other experts.

Separate, distinctions-based engagement with Inuit and Métis organizations, rights-holders, provinces and territories will also be undertaken to better understand the unique policing and community safety priorities of Inuit and Métis and how best they can be supported.

Calls for Justice: 5.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: 16

Planned for 2021-22:

Co-development of First Nations police services legislation:

  • Relationships will be established with the Assembly of First Nations, the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association and First Nations Police Governance Council

Engagement on Inuit and Métis policing and community safety priorities:

  • Preliminary work with Inuit and Métis partners, ISC, CIRNA, and provinces and territories to identify policing and community safety priorities that may be supported by the Government of Canada

Update on 2021-22:

Engagement for the Co-Development of First Nations police services legislation:

Relationships with the Assembly of First Nations, the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association and First Nations Police Governance Council were established and contribution agreements set with AFN and FNCPA. Bilateral engagement with these organizations is ongoing.

Federal-Provincial-Territorial Indigenous Policing Committees established to ensure that the federal legislation is informed by provincial/ territorial perspectives and is complementary to existing provincial/territorial police legislation and regulations.

Engagement on Inuit and Métis policing and community safety priorities:

PS has begun preliminary work with Inuit and Métis partners, ISC, CIRNA, and provinces and territories to identify policing and community safety priorities that may be supported by the Government of Canada. This will support the development and implementation of the proposed engagement process in 2022-23.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Co-development of First Nations police services legislation:

  • Spring 2022 Host virtual engagement sessions with First Nations, provinces and territories, police organizations and subject matter experts.
  • Spring 2022 and ongoing – collaborate with the Assembly of First Nations, Provinces and Territories, modern treaty and self-governing agreement signatories, the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association, and the First Nations Police Governance Council through bilateral discussions to identify and advance policing priorities.
  • Following completion of engagement process, PS and ISC, with the Assembly of First Nations and policing representatives, will assess timelines to begin co-development.

Engagement on Inuit and Métis policing and community safety priorities:

  • Contribution agreements are in place to support Inuit and Métis organizations through engagement.
  • Host virtual engagement sessions with Inuit and Métis organizations, rights-holders, provinces and territories.

National and Regional/community-based partners:

Participants in the engagement process for the co-development of First Nations police services legislation include:

First Nations organizations (ex. Assembly of First Nations, Women's/Youth/2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations, etc.), Modern Treaty and Self-Governing First Nations, individual First Nations, Provinces and Territories, First Nations Chiefs of Police Association, First Nations Police Governance Council, First Nations police services, and First Nations police governance bodies.

Participants in the engagement process on Inuit and Métis policing and community safety priorities

Provinces and Territories, Inuit and Métis organizations (Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Métis National Council, Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, Les Femmes Michifs Otipemisiwak, etc.), and Inuit and Métis rights-holders.

The Federal Pathway reiterated the commitment to co-develop a legislative framework with First Nations organizations that recognizes First Nations policing as an essential service (Call for Justice 5.4). Recognizing First Nations police services as an essential service through legislation would underscore that these services are indispensable for community safety and security, and need to be adequately resourced to provide well-funded, culturally sensitive and respectful policing services to the First Nations communities they serve.

Additional Funding for Infrastructure Program

Lead Department: Public Safety Canada

Funding: $108.6 million over five years, beginning in 2021-22

Description: The objective of the Funding for First Nations and Inuit Policing Facilities (FFNIPF) is to improve the safety and well-being of the occupants of First Nations and Inuit police facilities through financial assistance to plan, repair, construct and/or acquire new police facilities. These investments will support First Nation and Inuit communities to ensure their policing infrastructure meets building, policing facility, and health and safety standards.

Calls for Justice: 5.5

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

The FFNIPP Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group (WG) will examine and approve new infrastructure projects to be implemented from 2021-2022 to 2026-27.

Update on 2021-22:

In June 2021 and January 2022, the FFNIPP Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group (WG) approved new infrastructure projects to be implemented from 2021-2022 to 2026-27. Currently, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial FFNIPP WG has recommended police facility projects which maximize the allocated funding for each FY until 2026-27. Types of projects approved include repairs and improvements to Band-owned police detachments. The program is fully subscribed until 2026-27.

Coming up in 2022-23:

In fiscal year 2022-2023, PS will continue to allocate funding for police infrastructure projects, as well as support a professional assessment of the building conditions of community owned police facilities.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Provinces and Territories, First Nations/Inuit policing organizations (First Nations Chiefs of Police Association, First Nations and Inuit Policing Program Stakeholder Panel), First Nations/Inuit communities, Modern Treaty and Self-Governing First Nations/Inuit groups (as relevant), the RCMP and First Nations/Inuit police services.

Funding for First Nations and Inuit policing facilities supports Call for Justice 5.5 through the provision of policing services which are professional, dedicated and responsive to the First Nations and Inuit communities they serve, including in northern and remote areas.

Expansion and Stabilization of the First Nations and Inuit Policing Program (FNIPP)

Lead Department: Public Safety Canada

Funding: $540.3M/5 years and $126.8M ongoing

Description: Expanding and stabilizing the First Nations and Inuit Policing Program (FNIPP). Currently, the FNIPP is oversubscribed, with about 40% of eligible First Nation and Inuit communities unable to access the program. In collaboration with interested communities, provinces and territories, this initiative will support greater access to more equitable and culturally responsive police services in First Nation and Inuit communities, in keeping with the principles of self-governance, self-determination and reconciliation.

Calls for Justice: 5.4, 5.5

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

  • Summer/fall 2021: Inform provinces and territories of funding to support stabilization and expansion of the FNIPP and begin collaborative work to implement the stabilization investments by amending existing police service agreements.
  • Winter 2021/2022: Develop national criteria and processes to inform funding recommendations for 2022-23.

Update on 2021-22:

Public Safety has begun preliminary work with the provinces and territories to first stabilize and then expand the FNIPP and to identify new police infrastructure projects.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Develop a national process to identify priorities to inform the nature and scope of each of the areas of investment with a view to stabilize the current agreement holders and to expand the program into new communities.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Provinces and Territories, First Nations/Inuit policing organizations (First Nations Chiefs of Police Association, First Nations and Inuit Policing Program Stakeholder Panel), First Nations/Inuit communities, Modern Treaty and Self-Governing First Nations/Inuit groups (as relevant), and First Nations/Inuit police services.

Through the FNIPP and the FNIPF, Public Safety supports the provision of policing services which are professional, dedicated and responsive to the First Nations and Inuit communities they serve, including in northern and remote areas. The Federal Pathway and Budget 2021 investments will further support these policing services to meet the safety and justice needs of the communities. This contributes directly to Calls for Justice 5.4 and 5.5.

Increase prosecutorial capacity, including Indigenous victim and witness support in the three territories

Lead Department: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Funding: $23.5M/3 years (shared by all four PPSC initiatives)

Description: Increasing the number of prosecutors, administrators, Crown Witness Coordinators and paralegals to enable the PPSC to improve the level of security, justice and support provided to Indigenous victims and their families, witnesses and communities experiencing violence, including intimate partner violence and sexual assault in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

Calls for Justice: 1.5, 5.12, 9.2

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada anticipates hiring 50% of prosecutors, administrators, Crown Witness Coordinators and paralegals in the three territories beginning in 2021-2022 as a way to improve the level of security, justice and support provided to Indigenous victims and their families, witnesses and communities experiencing violence.

Update on 2021-22:

The PPSC only received the funds mid-way through the fiscal year, which delayed the overall staffing strategy. Other issues, such as delays in obtaining security clearances, have also affected staffing processes. In particular, the hiring process for Crown Witness Coordinators (CWCs) in the Nunavut Regional Office has been delayed due to inadequate housing supply in Iqaluit. Despite these delays, the PPSC remains on track to hire the prosecutors, administrators, CWCs and paralegals in the three territories, as planned.

Coming up in 2022-23:

PPSC anticipates filling remaining FTE positions to improve its prosecutorial capacity.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Not applicable

As highlighted in the MMIWG report, as part of the criminal justice system, the PPSC is currently unable to provide the full extent and continuity of support victims and witnesses deserve throughout the court process. Building trust and clear communication are essential to prosecutions. The PPSC's increase in prosecutorial capacity will enable prosecution teams to spend as much time as necessary with victims and witnesses to establish trust and properly prepare them for the unfamiliar and traumatic court process. Although this approach is broadly linked to other Calls for Justice, it responds directly to Calls for Justice 1.5 and 5.12.

As requested through Call for Justice 9.2, recruitment efforts related to this initiative will focus on increasing Indigenous representation among the three northern regional offices, where possible.

Create and staff four Inuktut-speaking Inuit paralegal positions in Nunavut

Lead Department: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Funding: $23.5M/3 years (shared by all four PPSC initiatives)

Description: The Nunavut Agreement protects Inuit rights, including employment as set out in Article 23. The new paralegal positions will assist in meeting obligations under Article 23 of the Nunavut Agreement and support the Nunavut Court of Justice initiative to increase Inuit representation within the Courts.

Calls for Justice: 5.12

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada anticipates filling all four paralegal positions within one year of receiving funding.

Update on 2021-22:

The PPSC only received the funds mid-way through 2021-22, which delayed the overall staffing strategy. However, the PPSC will fill two to three of the paralegal positions with Inuit employees in newly created positions that will conduct prosecutions in Nunavut.

Coming up in 2022-23:

All four paralegal positions will be filled.

National partners: Pilimmaksaivik (Federal Centre of Excellence for Inuit Employment in Nunavut)

Regional and community-based partners: Maliiganik Tukisiiniakvik Legal Services (Nunavut Legal Aid) and the Nunavut Court of Justice

The importance of Inuit representation and the ability for PPSC employees in Nunavut to speak in InuktutFootnote 1, is highlighted in the 2018 Nunavut Inuit Labour Force Analysis. The creation of Inuktut-speaking Inuit paralegal positions in Nunavut assists the PPSC in responding to Call for Justice 5.12, as well as meeting obligations under Article 23 of the Nunavut Agreement. These positions also support the PPSC's initiative to increase Inuit representation within the Courts.

Develop and pursue a one-time engagement strategy

Lead Department: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Funding: $23.5M/3 years (shared by all four PPSC initiatives)

Description: Engaging victims, Elders and community leaders of First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities currently served by the PPSC in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The overall objective is to build a relationship with Indigenous communities and increase confidence and willingness of Indigenous victims and witnesses of violent crime to engage the criminal justice process and allow for greater ability to address root causes of violent crime through restorative justice approaches.

Calls for Justice: 9.2, 9.2ii

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada anticipates securing the services of a consultant with expertise in Indigenous relations as early as December 2021 to develop and to pursue its engagement strategy.

Update on 2021-22:

The PPSC is currently seeking the professional services of a consultant to assist with formulating an engagement strategy with indigenous groups in the three territories.

While the necessary steps are undertaken to identify the consultant the PPSC will work with, important preliminary efforts have been made to prepare the organization to move forward with the engagement strategy:

  • The PPSC is part of the Indigenous Justice Strategy committee led by Justice Canada, which will contribute to better understanding the context in which the PPSC will integrate its own engagement strategy and avoid duplication of effort and engagement fatigue.
  • The PPSC has established a National Indigenous Employees Council that will support internal aspects of the engagement strategy; provide guidance on best ways to carry out the strategy; and, assist in the creation of relationships with communities when possible.
  • The PPSC's NWT regional office created and filled a permanent general counsel position that has, among its top priorities, engaging with Indigenous communities to improve the PPSC's approach in supporting victims and witnesses of sexual offences.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The engagement strategy will take place in 2022-2023.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The Public Prosecution Service of Canada anticipates engaging with victims, witnesses, justice committees, local partners and Indigenous community leaders in the three territories.

In response to Calls for Justice 9.2 and 9.2ii, the PPSC will engage victims, Elders and community leaders of First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities currently served by the PPSC in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. A consultant with relevant Indigenous expertise will design an outreach and engagement strategy that will support the PPSC's goal to modify and expand upon the delivery of its responsibilities in a way that is accessible and responsive to First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples across the three territories.

Improve the Inuit Justice training curriculum and develop new Justice training curriculums that reflect First Nations and Métis realities respectively

Lead Department: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Funding: $23.5M/3 years (shared by all four PPSC initiatives)

Description: Updating and expanding the existing Inuit Justice training curriculum to include new training sessions and modules that are more comprehensive. New First Nations and Métis Justice training curriculums will be developed. Distinctions-based consultations will inform the format and content of all three curriculums.

Calls for Justice: 10.1, 16.27, 17.8, 17.29

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

As early as 2021-2022, The Public Prosecution Service of Canada will secure the services of at least one consultant with distinctions-based expertise to update the Inuit Justice curriculum and develop the First Nations and Métis curriculums.

Priority target groups will include regional offices in the three territories and prosecution teams across the country.

Update on 2021-22:

The PPSC is currently working on securing the services of an Indigenous-owned consulting firm to develop and deliver these particular training curriculums.

Nonetheless, in 2021-22, the PPSC began the delivery of a PPSC-specific training for prosecutors that focuses on equipping them to apply an intersectional lens to their prosecutorial work. This is an important stepping-stone to increasing prosecutors' ability to incorporate the lived experiences of individuals subjected to systemic discrimination and overrepresentation in the criminal justice system.

So far, 36% of prosecutors have completed this mandatory training, including: all Chief Federal Prosecutors and their deputies; the Director of Public Prosecutions and both Deputy Directors, all members from the PPSC's National Prosecution Policy Committee, as well as many prosecutors from across the country.

In addition, the PPSC is reviewing its Deskbook, which sets out the guiding principles that all federal prosecutors, and persons acting as federal prosecutors, must follow, to ensure that PPSC policies are not discriminatory and to provide a policy framework that allows prosecutors to exercise discretion in a manner that will, over time, reduce the over-representation of Indigenous persons in the criminal justice system.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Training delivery will continue in 2022-23 alongside the cultural competency training that will be developed and delivered by the consulting firm.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The Public Prosecution Service of Canada will use a distinctions-based approach for its engagement related to the renewal and development of Inuit, First Nations and Métis training. Identification of specific groups/organizations to be determined.

The overall objective of the review and expansion of the Inuit Justice Curriculum is to update and provide comprehensive information about the cultural, legal, and historical contexts involving Nunavut and the Inuit, including government actions that caused direct and vicarious trauma to Inuit. All members of the Nunavut regional office must take this training once they join the office; however, this will be expanded to regional offices across the country where there is an identified need to serve the Inuit community.

The development of new First Nations and a Métis training curriculums will provide all employees in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, as well as prosecution teams across the country, the opportunity to understand the social history, culture and traditions of the Indigenous communities in their respective region, and allow for better integration of distinctions-based considerations on individual files. Both curriculums will be designed with accessibility in mind. Each training curriculum will also include distinctions-based justice-related issues and an overview of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

This approach directly supports Calls For Justice 10.1, 16.27, 17.8 and 17.29. It will minimize the traumatic impact on victims and witnesses from their involvement in the justice system, and enabling them to provide their evidence in an effective manner requires a greater understanding of the impact of their current, historical and intergenerational trauma. Improving the Inuit Justice training curriculum and developing training on Indigenous justice-related issues that reflect First Nations and Métis realities, will increase the prosecution teams' cultural competency. This will allow for better integration of distinctions-based considerations on individual files, encourage greater participation of Indigenous victims and witnesses in the court process resulting in greater restorative justice for the survivor, their family, the community and the accused.

Resource review at the CSC healing lodge for women

Lead Department: Correctional Service of Canada

Funding: The source of funds would be within CSC's existing mechanisms.

Description: Identifying the capacity required to effectively address the rehabilitation and intervention needs of indigenous women, ultimately enhancing their potential for successful reintegration in partnership with Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge (OOHL), a multi-level security facility for women located in Saskatchewan. Established in 1995, OOHL provides culturally appropriate programming and traditional healing practices, facilitated by Elders and Spiritual Advisors.

The review will assess the resource allocation model for women offender institutions vis-à-vis the current funding structure and operational needs of OOHL.

Calls for Justice: 14.6, 14.8

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

In 2021-2022, the Correctional Service of Canada will review existing resources related to service delivery requirements. This work may include the development of a preliminary business case to seek additional resources.

Update on 2021-22:

The review of resources at the CSC healing lodge is in its initial stages and has included the preliminary identification of gaps and needs. A more in-depth review will continue in 2022-2023.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Finalization and submission of business case, as applicable. Implement proposed enhancements, if approved, in collaboration with relevant sectors and stakeholders.

National and Regional/community-based partners: Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge, in conjunction with the Nekaneet First Nation in Saskatchewan.

Through CSC's corporate priority, Effective, culturally appropriate interventions and reintegration support for First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders, CSC strives to achieve improved results for Indigenous offenders. The review will address Calls for Justice 14.6 and 14.8 by enhancing capacity to address the needs of Indigenous women offenders through mental health, trauma and gender responsive interventions. A review of operational, mental health and personnel resources will ensure that the rehabilitative and reintegration needs of Indigenous women are appropriately addressed.

Research on security assessment tools

Lead Department: Correctional Service of Canada

Funding: The source of funds would be within CSC's existing mechanisms.

Description: Working with external academic partners to look at the development of Indigenous Risk Assessment tools and decision-making processes. This initiative is designed to inform CSC of ways in which the security assessment tools and processes may be more gender informed and culturally relevant for Indigenous cultures. A large part of this process involves seeking the input of Indigenous voices through a variety of means led by the external academics using Indigenous Research Methodologies. These approaches are designed to embed Indigenous voices throughout the development process and will inform the content and processes that are involved in security assessments.

Calls for Justice: 14.4

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Development of a complete project plan for consultation and future progress on the initiative to examine security assessment tools and procedures that are gender informed and culturally relevant for Indigenous Peoples.

Update on 2021-22:

CSC has embarked on a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the University of Regina to undertake the development of an Indigenous-informed risk assessment instrument(s). The MOU was signed in October of 2019 and is in place until October of 2024. A Service Exchange Agreement (SEA) is created each fiscal year to reflect the work on the project for that year.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The SEA for 2022-2023 is still in development. The project will continue this year with the eventual objective of having a report on the future of security assessment tools and processes that can be considered for implementation by CSC.

National partners: External academics in partnership with CSC.

Regional and community-based partners: Correctional Services Canada works directly with the independent researchers at the University of Regina as well as the Elders council to provide arm's length support as the project proceeds.

The initiative directly addresses Call for Justice 14.4 to evaluate, update, and develop security classification scales and tools that are sensitive to the nuances of Indigenous backgrounds and realities.

RCMP Intercultural Learning Strategy

Lead Department: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Funding: $75M/5 yearsFootnote 2

Description: The RCMP Intercultural Learning Strategy is a broad suite of learning products and initiatives that work to develop employee competencies toward diverse populations, including Indigenous Peoples. By supporting employee competence through a number of learning activities, this work will support one of the Federal Pathway's objective to enhance relationships between police services and Indigenous communities.

Calls for Justice: 9.1. 9.2i, 9.2ii, 9.2iv

Calls for Miskotahâ: 6c, 6d, 39

Planned for 2021-22:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will launch the following new online courseware for all employees in 2021, including:

  • Uniting Against Racism Learning Series;
  • Restorative Justice;
  • Indigenous Learning Series; and,
  • What's your perspective?

There will also be increased engagement with Indigenous communities to continue to inform the development of specific learning products tailored to the requirements of both the communities and the police.

Update on 2021-22:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police has launched the following new online courseware for all employees in 2021, including:

  • Uniting Against Racism Learning Series;
  • Indigenous Learning Series; and,
  • What's your perspective?

During 2021-2022, the RCMP's Learning and Development sector met with employees from Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, and the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples. An invitation was extended for these organizations to provide feedback on key learning products such as Uniting Against Racism, and Cultural Awareness and Humility. Feedback from these communities will be received in 2022-2023, with a view to identify learning gaps to inform the Intercultural Learning Strategy.

Coming up in 2022-23:

Implementation of specific learning solutions tailored to the requirements of both the communities and the police, in support of the RCMP'S Intercultural Learning Strategy, will continue.

In 2022-2023, Learning and Development will seek to engage the Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council, Native Women's Association of Canada, Women of the Métis Nation, and the National Association of Friendship Centres.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will engage internal and external partners and partners in the First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities.

The Cultural Awareness and Humility (CAH) training aims to provide an improved capacity across the RCMP to effectively respond to gender-based violence in a gender and culturally sensitive and trauma-informed manner.

In response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's Call to Action #57, the RCMP is committed to providing Indigenous cultural competency training to RCMP employees throughout their careers. To enhance key competencies throughout the organization, the RCMP will:

  • Develop and deliver new, division-specific, cultural competency training for RCMP officers;
  • Update its broader national cultural competency training, informed by Indigenous women and other experts; and
  • Use GBA Plus as a tool to examine existing training, in order to ensure it is gender- and culturally-sensitive.

Progress to date: Organizational Capacity and Coordination

There are also initiatives moving forward that cut across several categories, or that engage multiple departments. These support thematic goals in multiple areas, including those that directly support family members and survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and funding to support Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people's organizations.

Key Highlights

In 2021-22:

  • The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Secretariat worked to convene federal partners on key discussions on the impacts of their Federal Pathway initiatives, as well as to discuss the work of federal, provincial, territorial and Indigenous partners on implementation.
  • The new Funding to Enhance Support for Indigenous Women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ Organizations program was launched with a Call for Proposals; this 2021-22 call resulted in 20 project funding agreements with 4 national organizations, 13 regional and community-level Indigenous women's organizations and 3 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations. Of the total 20 funded, 12 are new organizations that have not received funding through this program previously.

Celebrating the Agency and Expertise of Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People

The ultimate goal of ending violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people requires long-term, sustained and dedicated efforts by all National Action Plan and Federal Pathway partners, and the willingness on the part of governments to adapt program and services according to the expressed needs of the populations they serve. In its coordination and liaison role, the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) Secretariat worked throughout 2021-22 to maintain contact with all Indigenous partners as well as provincial and territorial governments involved in the National Action Plan, and with all federal departments in the Federal Pathway, helping ensure continued focus on the successful implementation of these plans and their initiatives. The Secretariat also worked to track progress on related priorities at the federal level, and is responsible for the preparation and release of the Federal Pathway Annual Progress Report. The Secretariat is also responsible for the management and delivery of the Indigenous-led Data Research Projects Program and the Support for the Well-being of Families and Survivors Program. It also provides funding support for Indigenous partner engagement, the National Families and Survivors Circle, and other Indigenous advisory groups.

The Government of Canada is committed to a collaborative approach on the part of its departments and agencies, and openness to continued discussions with Indigenous partners, families and survivors on their priorities for Indigenous communities. To ensure such priorities inform the development and delivery of initiatives and programs, in 2021-22 the department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs launched the Funding to enhance support for Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations program. This initiative funds national, regional and community-level Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations to advocate and give voice to grassroots Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people in support of the Federal Pathway commitment to identify and address the factors that contribute to increased vulnerabilities of Indigenous women girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people across the country. This is accomplished in two ways:

  1. By providing Culturally-Competent Gender-Based Analysis (CCGBA Plus) funding to the National Indigenous Women's Organizations (NIWO) to support CCGBA Plus capacity to enable customization and support the CCGBA Plus vision of each organization, including activities that are complementary to the work being undertaken on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, Gender-Based Violence (GBV), the development of an Action Plan pursuant to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, health, education, and more.
  2. By providing longer-term stable project funding to Indigenous women's and 2SLGTBQQIA+ organizations so that they are able to increase engagement with membership and communities, and conduct research and identify priorities, issues and concerns. Organizations are then better able to engage and collaborate with Government to bring forward these perspectives in the development of federal policy, program and legislation.

The release of this program, guided in its development by input from families and survivors, forms part of the Government of Canada's response to the Call for Justice 1.8, for all governments to provide long-term funding in support of Indigenous organizations and community engagement to address gender-based violence.

All together, these cross-departmental initiatives help bolster partnership and collaborative efforts between governments and Indigenous partners to move the dial forward on progress in the elimination of gender-based violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

Federal Pathway Updates

The table below provides key updates on the status of progress for each initiative:

Initiative Update on 2021-22 Update on Engagement Calls for Justice/Calls for Miskotahâ

Establishment of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People Secretariat

Lead Department: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Funding: $16M/6 years

Description: This funding will support the establishment of a permanent MMIWG and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People Secretariat, to coordinate work across the federal government. The Secretariat will also continue to convene partners for the renewal of the Federal Pathway and National Action Plan, and to support related implementation work on the issues.

Calls for Justice: 1.1, 15.8

Calls for Miskotahâ: N/A

Planned for 2021-22:

Through a whole-of-government approach, the Secretariat will focus its work on fulfilling its commitment to provide a fuller portrait of initiatives moving forward under the Federal Pathway, as well as focus on working with partners to confirm the way forward. In addition, the Secretariat will launch its new programs and advisory bodies, as well as work on producing usable metrics to measure progress through the Horizontal Initiative on MMIWG and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People, as well as within the context of the Annual Progress Report.

Update on 2021-22:

  • In 2021-22, the Secretariat became a permanently established unit within CIRNAC. The Secretariat is responsible for the coordination and development of the Horizontal Initiative Results Framework on the delivery of the Federal Pathway and the Federal Pathway Annual Progress Reports.
  • 2 new programs were successfully launched by the Secretariat in 2021 and budgets were fully expended: the Support for the Well-being of Families and Survivors program, and the Indigenous-led Data Research Project program.
  • 3 Indigenous partner organizations received Engagement funding support and 9 Indigenous organizations received funding for Working Groups in 2021-22.
  • The Secretariat also supported the continued operation of the National Families and Survivors Circle throughout the 2021-22 fiscal year.
  • The Secretariat served as liaison and maintained regular contact with all National Action Plan partners (Indigenous, Provincial, Territorial) and also serves as communications centre on matters related to missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLBGTQQIA+ people.

Coming up in 2022-23:

The Secretariat will work with Indigenous partners, provinces and territories toward the continued implementation of the Federal Pathway and National Action Plan, as well as produce its second Annual Progress Report. It will continue to support new programs launched under B2021 funding as well as work with partners to determine new or emerging priorities.

National and Regional/community-based partners:

  • Families and Survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people;
  • Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people's organizations;
  • National and Regional Indigenous Organizations;
  • Municipalities, Provinces and Territories;
  • Federal departments and agencies.

As a unit of the lead department for the Government of Canada's response to the MMIWG National Inquiry report, the MMIWG Secretariat held a coordinating role in the development and of the National Action Plan and Federal Pathway, in response to Call for Justice 1.1. The MMIWG Secretariat is also responsible for the annual production and release of the Federal Pathway Progress Reports.

The MMIWG Secretariat, by way of its production of the Federal Pathway annual report and co-development of the National Action Plan annual report, helps support accountability, in response to Call for Justice 15.8, by tracking, compiling and sharing with Indigenous partners and the Canadian public as a whole regular progress updates on commitments made -or lack thereof- by way of these annual reports. In addition, the Secretariat's ongoing discussions and regular update meetings with federal, provincial and territorial partners further assists in maintaining focus on the Calls for Justice as ongoing priorities for all governments, and the necessity for these governments to meaningfully follow-through with dedicated and measurable actions and commitments.

Funding to enhance support for Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations

Lead Department: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Funding: $36.3M/5 years and $8.6M ongoing

Description: Ensuring that the voices and perspectives of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are reflected in all aspects of decision-making that impacts their lives.

Calls for Justice: 1.8

Calls for Miskotahâ: 7, 8

Planned for 2021-22:

  • July 2021 to August 2021: The Indigenous Women's Relations Unit ( IRLU) responsible for the delivery of this program will confirm funding, then design and develop the new strategic approach to funding grassroots Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations, environmental scan of organizations, assessment of funding gaps, and representative gaps
  • August-September 2021: IRLU will enter into discussions with organizations already in receipt of funding to receive proposals and explore opportunities to amend their agreement (considerations include longer-term agreements and additional funding)
  • October-November 2021: IRLU will begin targeted outreach to new grassroots organizations calling for proposals
  • January-February 2022: Drafting of new agreements
  • February-March 2022: Implementation of performance management framework, collection of data, analysis and preparation of annual internal report.

Update on 2021-22:

  • Seven organizations were approved (3 national and 4 regional) for funding through multi-year agreements beginning in 2021-22.
  • 16 organizations have been approved for funding beginning in fiscal year 2022-23.
  • Overall, the 2021-22 Call for Proposals resulted in 20 project funding agreements with 4 national organizations, 13 regional and community-level Indigenous women's organizations and 3 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations.
  • Of the total 20 funded, 12 are new organizations that have not received funding through this program previously.

Coming up in 2022-23:

  • The Indigenous Women's Relations Unit will continue relationship building and identify new project or funding opportunities for a targeted call for proposals.
  • IRLU will conduct an annual review of the relationships and funding agreements with recipients.
  • Preparation of mid-program analysis and internal report preparation and design of Year 5 program review process.

National and Regional/community-based partners: The partners are national, regional and local Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations.

An environmental scan will be done in collaboration with Indigenous partners, Other government departments and Provincial and Territorials governments to ensure the engagement of a comprehensive group of organizations.

The Supporting Indigenous Women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ Organizations program in part responds to Call for Justice 1.8, which calls upon governments to support national, regional, and local Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations. Providing Indigenous women's and 2SLGBTQQIA+ organizations stable funding to increase policy capacity advances grassroots voices and priorities and supports meaningful change amongst all levels of government.

This initiative also supports Calls for Miskotahâ 7 and 8 of through the provision of funding for the implementation of the Canada-Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak Declaration that sets out a framework for co-development and collaboration on advancing shared Métis women priorities. Many priorities are specifically targeting the identification and elimination of socioeconomic barriers and gaps. Culturally-competent GBA Plus funding to LFMO will support and advance the implementation for the Métis specific Gender-Based Analysis Plus to all levels of government in enabling greater capacity by LFMO to advise on application.

Working Together to Monitor Progress

How do we know if we are making progress? Are Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people safer? The challenge of answering these questions, now and for the future, are based on the need to improve the quality of information related to Indigenous Peoples in general and to Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people in particular.

This section highlights progress over the past year specific to the initiatives announced in the Federal Pathway as well as elaborates on important work underway which can positively impact the data landscape on this and related issues.

Current Challenges to Monitoring Progress

Data in all forms (quantitative and qualitative) are central to monitoring the ability of governments, at all levels, to achieve transformative change. While there have been some improvements in the data landscape, many challenges still remain, particularly related to Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. As noted in Creating New Pathways for Data: The 2021 National Action Plan Data Strategy, existing challenges with measurement and the quality of available data mean that measuring progress on eliminating violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people will need to be considered through a meaningful process that takes into account the challenges that currently exist. Challenges which are well-documented when it comes to finding, extracting and developing data to measure outcomes for MMIWG2S+ people. These challenges include:

  • The data landscape related to missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is vast. As noted in the National Inquiry's Final Report, the issue of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people encompasses so many data points that we must first understand what all of the related data are, and where they are located through different jurisdictions, including those outside of the Government of Canada.
  • The quality of data related to the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people can be poor. There is a lack of baseline data available. Data on missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, as well as data related to Indigenous people more generally, cannot always be broken down to Indigenous identity groups, regions, or demographics (e.g. 2SLGBTQQIA+ people). Also, some data are not always collected and reported consistently.
  • The relevance of the data to Indigenous worldviews is largely disconnected. As Indigenous partners have noted, any measurement of progress needs to stem from Indigenous understandings of safety and progress and developed with Indigenous partners. Change must be made, felt, and measured, on the ground.
  • Improvements in data quality take time. It may take a long time to see improvements in data that reflect results "on the ground." While these improvements are made, Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people continue to be targeted.

Clearly, these challenges mean that the Government of Canada needs to be open to new ways of collecting, understanding and reporting so that it can provide a fuller picture of both the progress underway, and the challenges that need to be addressed. Community level data collection can include the diverse voices of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people themselves, as well as speak more concretely to impact. In addition, and given the complicated nature of the work underway, the Government of Canada acknowledges that work must be accelerated, but that truly transformational change in the area of data and measurement will take time and collaboration.

Outcomes for Accountability

Since the release of the National Action Plan in June 2021, federal departments, agencies and organizations have been collaborating to implement many of the elements of the National Action Plan Data Strategy, as well as determine what steps are required to address the challenges of measuring progress. This includes taking into consideration the many themes included within the National Action Plan Data Strategy's Quantitative Indicator Framework through five thematic clusters: Culture, Health and Wellness, Human Safety and Security, Justice, and Organizational Capacity and Coordination – as well as its ultimate outcome: the safety of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

To date, the focus has been on deciding how to measure the following outcomes, with more to come through evolving conversation, improved data sources, and engagement with Indigenous partners. High-level outcomes provide the "big picture" for the Federal Pathway's goals, while the more specific outcome elaborations represent the anticipated impact of the actions underway:

Overall Outcome

Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, wherever they are, live free from violence, and are celebrated, honoured, respected, valued, treated equitably, safe, and secure. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • Violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is eliminated.

Culture Outcomes

Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, no matter where they live, are supported to revitalize their cultures, to restore their traditional roles and to strengthen their identities. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people demonstrate connection to their language and culture.
  • People living in Canada have an increased understanding and appreciation of Indigenous cultures.

Health and Wellness Outcomes

Indigenous communities are healthy and safe. Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people encounter health systems free from racism and discrimination. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people's healthcare experiences are improved.
  • Health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are improved.

Human Safety and Security Outcomes

Discrimination and violence directed toward Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is eliminated. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • Socioeconomic factors contributing to violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are addressed.
  • The safety of communities in which Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people live is improved.

Justice Outcomes

Access to justice for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is improved. This includes a fairer, stronger, more inclusive and representative justice system that respects the rights of Indigenous Peoples and that protects Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people have increased access to fairer, more inclusive justice, including access to information, resources and support services, that respects their rights.
  • Systemic racism against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people in legislation, policy and within the justice system is eliminated.

Organizational Capacity and Coordination Outcomes

The leadership of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is strengthened and the voices of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are reflected in all aspects of decision-making that impact their lives. More specific outcomes related to this thematic outcome include:

  • The capacity of Indigenous and federal organizations to address Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people's needs is improved.
  • Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are engaged in the decisions that most affect them.

Key Updates

To support measurement of these important objectives, a number of initiatives included in the Federal Pathway include resources to improve data related to Indigenous Peoples, inclusive of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

Initiative Update 2021/22 Coming up for 2022/23

Indigenous-Led Data Research Projects Program

Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada – MMIWG Secretariat

This is a project-based program that will fund submissions from eligible organizations to develop innovative and Indigenous-centred methodologies to better understand the issue of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, as well as understand the impact of programs on the ground.

In 2021-22, the initiative aimed to develop the program guidelines and Call for Proposals, as well as launch and fund the first data projects.

The ILDRPP program launched on August 12, 2021. The 1st Call for Proposals closing on October 31, 2021, resulted in the funding of 19 new data research projects across the country, inclusive of all distinctions.

For 2022-23, a new Call for Proposals will support new projects.

National Indigenous Data Advisory Group on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People

Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada – MMIWG Secretariat

The National Indigenous Data Advisory Group on MMIWG2S+ will assist with the further development of indicators, the improvement of reliable baseline data, and advise on identified data gaps regarding missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people.

The National Indigenous Data Advisory Body on MMIWG2S+ was inspired by the direction provided in the National Action Plan's Data Strategy. To develop the model, the Government of Canada engaged with various Indigenous partners, families and survivors and data specialists, federal, provincial and territorial representatives, and Government of Canada departments.

The National Indigenous Data Advisory Group on MMIWG2S+ was not launched in 2021-22. Work is underway to launch in early 2022-23.

In early 2022-23, the inaugural membership for the National Indigenous Data Advisory Group on MMIWG2S+ will be finalized with Indigenous partners to ensure a diverse representation of voices and perspectives. Once launched, it will be asked to provide advice on various projects underway, as well as on the inclusion of key metrics in the next Annual Progress Report. In addition, members will participate in the evaluation of the next Indigenous-Led Data Research Projects Program intake.

The group is expected to convene for the first time in fall 2022.

Justice Data Modernization Initiative

Justice Canada and Statistics Canada

The Justice Data Modernization Initiative will improve the collection and use of disaggregated criminal justice data, in view of developing policy responses to the overrepresentation of Indigenous and racialized people in the criminal justice system, as accused/offenders or victims/survivors.

In 2021-22, the initiative aimed to:

Justice Canada:

  • Develop draft research plan for 2022/23 to 2024/25 research activities by March 31, 2022
  • Develop draft documents for Request for Standing Offer for quantitative research and data science services by March 31, 2022

Statistics Canada:

  • Launch a Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on National Indicators of Overrepresentation in the Criminal Justice System.

To date, Justice Canada has reached all of its projected 2021/22 milestones, including the draft research plan, draft documents, and participating in the launch of the FPT Working Group on National Indicators of Overrepresentation in the Criminal Justice System. It has also engaged on research plans with 12 federal departments as well as FPT Liaison Officer's Committee under the National Justice Statistics Initiative. This includes collaborating with Statistics Canada on several research proposals, with implementation to begin in 2022-23.

To date, Statistics Canada has reached all of its project milestones for 2021-22. In January 2022, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on National Indicators of Overrepresentation in the Criminal Justice System was launched and began work on identifying indicators of over-representation for the areas of policing, courts, corrections, including a focus on indicators for youth across all systems. The development of the framework will leverage indicators from existing frameworks and recommendations.

In 2022-23, the departments will undertake the following actions:

Justice Canada:

  • Launch Request for Standing Offer for quantitative research and data sciences services
  • Establish letters of agreement / memoranda of understanding with federal partners
  • Establish contract(s) with private sector

Statistics Canada:

In collaboration with the Statistics Canada's Centre for Indigenous Statistics and Partnerships and their partners:

  • Produce an analytical article examining the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in corrections
  • Link Integrated Criminal Courts Survey data to Census 2021 data, and conduct analysis of linked data to examine overrepresentation of Indigenous and racialized populations in criminal courts, in preparation of 2023/24 of analytical report communicating findings
  • Create a draft framework of indicators required to measure overrepresentation in the criminal justice system

National strategy to ensure consistency in practices for reporting missing Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people

Statistics Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Statistics Canada is to engage with indigenous partners and Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) to ensure police have consistent reporting mechanisms of information on missing Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and other missing persons. National standards will ensure that all cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are thoroughly reported and investigated. This work responds to Call for Justice 9.5.v.

In 2021-22, the initiative aimed to:

  • Confirm the source of funding for the work to proceed and staff the project lead and analyst positions
  • Complete draft literature review
  • Secure support of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) via the Policing with Indigenous Peoples Committee to pursue the project
  • Create a project plan for roll out for 2022-23
  • Begin the strategic engagement plan
  • Begin the engagement document

To date, the initiative has reached all milestones. Staffing occurred in the latter half of the year, with the lead beginning in December 2021. Over January and March 2022, Statistics Canada engaged with the CACP Policing with Indigenous Peoples Committee to establish collaboration. First drafts of the literature review, strategic engagement plan and the engagement document were completed.

In 2022-23, Statistics Canada in collaboration with the CACP, will launch the engagements to discuss and develop:

  • Recommendations on national data standards;
  • Recommendations regarding amendments to police systems, processes and protocols;
  • Recommendations on the establishment of a national database on missing persons.

The engagements will build upon existing literature and will seek feedback from police services, representatives of families and survivors, communities non-governmental organizations, experts and government bodies.

Disaggregated data and new data collection: Advance the collection of data on Indigenous identity of victims and accused through national police-reported crime statistics–data development

Statistics Canada

This program is in response to growing demands for information contributing to a better understanding of the experiences of First Nations people, Inuit and Métis in terms of their interaction with the police as accused and victims of crime. The need for quality data about the experience of Indigenous Peoples and racialized communities with Canada's criminal justice system is paramount to understanding the extent to which people from these communities are represented in Canada's criminal justice system, beginning with their interactions with the police.

In 2021-22, this initiative aimed to launch the engagements and draft initial recommendations.

To date, the initiative reached its milestones. As a first step to developing recommendations on this potential data collection, Statistics Canada completed the engagement document and launched the engagement process in July 2021. The process was to seek feedback on the collection of Indigenous and racialized identity data through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. Specifically, it sought advice on the value of collecting this sensitive information, how the police should collect and report the data, what information should be reported by the police, and how the data should be used and accessed. Invitations to provided feedback were sent to hundreds of community organizations, academics, police services, and other parties of interest. The engagement was also posted on the Statistics Canada website for response from the general public.

Written feedback and responses from virtual roundtables were received by January 2022 and analysis of these began in February. A 'What We Heard' report is in preparation on this national process engagement with indigenous and racialized partners, communities and organizations.

  • Finalize the draft of 'What we heard' and initial recommendations. Further refine them to inform implementation (Spring/summer 2022).
  • Public release of draft recommendations Fall 2022 for final feedback.
  • Final recommendations published end of fiscal 2022-23.

Data disaggregation and new data collection: Statistics on gender-based violence and feelings of safety

Statistics Canada and Women and Gender Equality

This work aims to advance the collection of data on gender-based violence (GBV) and feelings of safety, allowing researchers, policymakers, service providers and others to respond appropriately to missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and related issues.

Through this initiative, critical data are being made available that will increase awareness and understanding of the prevalence and patterns of GBV in Indigenous communities, and—through the second cycle of the SSPPS—how those are changing over time. Data disaggregation and intersectional analyses will provide important information on the nature of GBV experienced, who is experiencing it, who is perpetrating it and the context within which it happens. This information is critical to informing efforts to prevent and address GBV, and to supporting survivors and their families.

In April and May of 2021, a series of five analytical reports were released, focusing on intimate partner violence for vulnerable populations, which include data and insights on Indigenous women:

Two additional WAGE-funded articles were produced by Statistics Canada and released in spring 2022:

Also as part of the federal Gender-based Violence Strategy, in the 2021-22 fiscal year, Statistics Canada and WAGE developed a project plan for the second cycle of the SSPPS, which is a key means of collecting data on GBV in Canada. First implemented in 2018, the main objective of the survey is to measure the prevalence and nature of various forms of GBV, as well as characteristics of individuals who experience and perpetrate these behaviours.

Consultations on cycle 2 of the Survey of Safety in Public and Private Spaces (SSPPS) will take place in 2022-23.

Three related WAGE-funded research projects currently underway will also be completed in 2022-23. An overview of results will be available on WAGE's website. These projects focus on gender-based violence (GBV) and Indigenous communities, and focus respectively on urban service delivery in Ontario, the criminal justice system response in Inuit Nunangat, and using Indigenous Ways of Knowing for GBV prevention in British Columbia.

Coming Together to Improve the Data Landscape

This work aligns with key initiatives and processes already underway in key areas, including work underway in the areas of prevention, disaggregation, and strength-based approaches. All of these areas were cited in the National Action Plan Data Strategy as key to the path ahead:

  1. A Focus on Prevention:

    The most useful data can provide some sense of where we need to go. To this end, there are a number of projects under development to enable decision-makers to act with better information.

    For instance, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is developing the Canadian Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS). CCWIS will be a national public health information system based on case-level child welfare (child and family services) data, aiming to gather disaggregated, distinctions-based data about Inuit, First Nations and Métis children, and non-Indigenous children. Child welfare involvement is a key determinant of health and a missing data piece, essential to implementing evidence-based interventions to mitigate harm to children. Carefully built partnerships with data holders are necessary to the success of CCWIS. Data holders are provincial and territorial ministries of child and family services as well as Indigenous organizations.

    In addition, data development specifically related to the impact of violence in the lives of family members is underway through work conducted to improve the information within the Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) which will result in important new questions in its next cycle, in 2022. The Indigenous Peoples Survey is a national survey on the health, social and economic conditions of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit. Engagement with National Indigenous Organization and other Indigenous partners was conducted to inform content development. As a result, the 2022 IPS has a section that seeks to collect information on the number of individuals impacted by the loss of a loved one in their household and provides data to examine various outcomes in relation to this information. In addition, supplementary questions will address information gaps on housing, community wellness, mental health, victimization, access to services and child care, which are relevant to prevention.

  2. Recognizing the Need to Expand Disaggregated Data:

    Improvements in current sources are underway, including the addition of a gender question to the 2021 Census. The existing question on sex now refers to sex assigned at birth with a note included below the question to make that distinction. The new question on gender allows transgender and non-binary respondents to identify themselves, in addition to the question on sex at birth.

    In early 2021, Statistics Canada also released the Disaggregated Data Action Plan, which will lead to the production of detailed statistical information to highlight the experiences of specific population groups, such as women, Indigenous Peoples, racialized populations and people living with disabilities. The Plan, which groups dozens of projects, has multiple goals, including enhanced engagement and communication, expanded disaggregated data, increased access to disaggregated data, increased analytical insight on diverse groups of people, and the promotion of national statistical standards to enable data comparisons over time and across jurisdictions. The significance of this work as a whole cannot be understated – given the importance of data in public policy decision-making, ensuring the availability of better and more disaggregated information on the realities of Indigenous people, according to distinctions-based groups, gender identity, and other important markers, will ensure that we are able to determine what is working and what needs to change.

  3. Celebrating Strengths-Based Approaches:

    Historically, Indigenous people have been researched through a deficit-based lens. Projects and instruments that focus only on what is going wrong, can't always demonstrate what works and what is going right. To this end, work underway on several important data projects and instruments supports a strength-based approach. For instance, Employment and Social Development Canada, Statistics Canada and other federal departments are also collaborating on the development of the Canadian Indicator Framework for all people living in Canada, which includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The current goals, targets and indicators with estimates are on the Canadian Indicator Framework for the Sustainable Development Goals Data Hub and are updated every three years. A number of indicators under these goals align in concept with certain indicators that were proposed for the National Action Plan Data Strategy and the current focus is to work to provide estimates for First Nations people, Métis, and Inuit. Further, Finance Canada and Statistics Canada will be collaborating with National Indigenous Organizations for feedback on indicators within the Quality of Life Framework.

While these are important steps, it should also that change will take time. First, the process of data gathering maybe more time consuming than first thought or the collection cycles of data are not a yearly process. Secondly, any new or improved collection methods must respect existing laws and policies related to confidentiality to protect individuals from being identified in the case of small populations. This could mean that some data are only available at higher geographical levels (such as provincial/territorial or national).

Looking forward

The Government of Canada understands, as Indigenous partners have noted, that to ensure measurable and sustained progress in the reduction of gender-based violence and achieve a meaningful increase in the safety of Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ peoples, the National Action Plan and Federal Pathway must continue to evolve in keeping with the expressed needs and priorities of Indigenous partners and organizations. As identified in the National Inquiry's Calls for Justice, the Calls for Miskotahâ, and partner reports that were part of the National Action Plan, several gaps in measures to address areas of need related to the safety of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people remain, and further actions and resources will be required to successfully address them.

These areas of need include:

  1. The need to develop robust oversight and accountability mechanisms

    The Government of Canada has heard and acknowledged the need, as expressed throughout the National Inquiry's Final Report and the 2021 National Action Plan, to track concrete progress on improving the safety and security of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people and to hold all governments and institutions accountable for their action on this urgent issue. The UN Declaration Act requires the Government of Canada to report annually to Parliament on progress made to align the laws of Canada with the Declaration and on the development and implementation of the action plan. The annual report will contribute to accountability for making progress on implementing the Declaration. This approach is consistent with the Declaration itself, which calls on states to collaborate with Indigenous peoples on appropriate measures, including legislative measures, to achieve the goals set out in the Declaration.

  2. Further programs and initiatives that will improve access to educational opportunities, job training, and provide further opportunities for economic reconciliation for Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, as well as those that address safety in resource extraction and other industries

    Partners have identified a number of areas of priority that fall under this category, and that will contribute to improving access to education and training for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Partners have also noted key industries in which this is a priority, including safety and respect within industry and resource extraction companies, police services, programs tailored to creating opportunities for specific groups, and overall investments in programs that will enable Indigenous people to build capacity toward providing services that are culturally safe and trauma-informed, as well as Indigenous-led.

  3. Programs and initiatives oriented toward Indigenous youth, to help support better outcomes

    Prevention-based and strength-based measures are an important component of the work. In particular, partners have noted the need to focus on wraparound services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and youth, including Jordan's Principle's application for Inuit and Métis children and youth. These services include health and healing services as well as those oriented toward supporting and revitalizing cultural knowledge. Partners have also noted the importance of understanding Indigenous children and youth as rights-bearers, and of providing appropriate services and supports that reflect these rights.

  4. Programs and initiatives directed toward supporting healing and wellness for family members, survivors, and all Indigenous people, and expand supports to those serving their communities in the grass roots

    Indigenous partners, families and survivors have noted the need to support healing and wellness in a holistic way for family members, survivors and all Indigenous people, making it clear that healing and wellness are an important part of forward planning. Priority areas identified by partners include improved access to translation and language services for Indigenous people who may live outside of their home communities, healing for children and youth, domestic and intimate partner violence prevention, and preventative health supports. In addition, partners have noted the need for provinces and territories to work in cooperation with the Government of Canada to ensure access to healing and wellness services for all Indigenous people.

  5. Programs and initiatives that improve services for family members and survivors navigating the justice system

    Justice system contact remains an area where family members and survivors may experience harm or be re-traumatized by various elements of the process. For this reason, many partners' have noted the need to improve services for family members and survivors in contact with the justice system. Partners' priorities include increased Indigenous legal advocates and supports throughout family members' and survivors' interaction with the justice system including Indigenous language speakers and distinctions-based supports, the expansion of the Family Information Liaison Units program, training on Indigenous and 2SLGBTQQIA+ issues within the justice system, and the need for a comprehensive review of existing policies to ensure they support the dignity and respect due to family members and survivors.

  6. Public awareness campaigns demonstrated honour and respect for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people

    Partners have noted the need for public campaigns to raise awareness and to demonstrate honour and respect for all Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. These awareness-raising measures also include the need to improve the public service, to improve communications to Indigenous families and communities, including Indigenous men and boys, and the need to support more inclusive models of communications for underrepresented groups, such as 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. In addition, partners noted the need for expanded training programs throughout sectors of Canadian society and within Indigenous communities in Indigenous rights, anti-racism, anti-sexism, and anti-homophobia and transphobia.

  7. The need for data improvement and development specific to the issue of MMIWG and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people

    Partners have noted persistent gaps in existing data relating to missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people that must be addressed. A common goal of all contributing partners is the need to build a culturally-appropriate data infrastructure reflective of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people to support better information. Partner priorities also include the need to support Indigenous data sovereignty that is inclusive of families, survivors and to support capacity-building for the collection, analysis and storage of data within Indigenous communities. In addition, access to federal data for Indigenous partners has been identified as an important area of for development.

  8. Greater federal-provincial-territorial-Indigenous inter-jurisdictional and cross-jurisdictional collaboration

    Partners have noted that there is a need for improved inter-jurisdictional and cross-jurisdictional collaboration. A strong cross-governmental, cross-sectoral approach is needed to address the systemic issues of gender-based violence. From healthcare to child welfare, Indigenous Peoples are often caught between governments and unable to access services. Increased inter-jurisdictional funding is needed so that the various levels of government are better able to coordinate their services. In some cases federal legislation may be required to offer clarity on jurisdictional issues. These gaps must be closed to prevent any further inter-jurisdictional neglect.

Budget 2022

Budget 2022 was released by the Federal Government on April 7, 2022. By building on past investments, Budget 2022 will continue to address the root causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. New investments announced will have an impact for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Budget 2022 proposes to invest an additional $11 billion over six years to continue to support Indigenous children and families, and will enable Indigenous people and their communities to continue to grow and shape their futures. The investments announced under Budget 2022 also support key Calls for Justice and Calls for Miskotahâ, as well as many of the Principles for Change that serve to support the safety of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Full details on Budget 2022 can be found here: Budget 2022.

Initiatives planned for 2022-23, in each of the thematic areas, include:

Culture:

  • Enabling Inclusion and Stability: Increased Funding for Professional Arts Training Organizations – Canadian Heritage–$22.5 million over five years starting in 2022-23, and $5 million ongoing, to Canadian Heritage for the Canada Arts Training Fund (Call for Justice 2.2ii)
  • Renewing Canada's Anti-Racism Strategy (CARS) and creating a NAP to Combat Hate – Canadian Heritage–$85 million over four years, starting in 2022-23

Health and Wellness:

  • Distinctions-Based Mental Wellness Strategies, to maintain trauma-informed, culturally-appropriate, Indigenous led services to improve mental wellness, and to support efforts initiated through Budget 2021 to co-develop distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies – Indigenous Services Canada–$227.6 million over two years, starting in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5, 7.7, 17.4)

Human Safety and Security:

  • Enhancing Reaching Home to provide longer term certainty for the organizations doing vitally important work across the country and ensure that our communities have the support they need to continue to prevent and address homelessness – Infrastructure Canada–$562.2 million over two years, beginning in 2024-25 (Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.7, 12.4, 16.1, 16.18, 16.19, 18.25/ Calls for Miskotahâ 18, 23, 25, 26)
  • Ending chronic homelessness by conducting research about what further measures could contribute to eliminating chronic homelessness to ensure communities have access to all of the knowledge and tools they need to effect change, working towards the Government's commitment to end chronic homelessness by 2030 – Infrastructure Canada–$18.1 million over three years, beginning in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.6, 12.4, 18.25)
  • Addressing critical housing needs by implementing initial steps to ensure stable and sustainable housing and close the housing gap between Indigenous people and non-Indigenous Canadians – Indigenous Services Canada/Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada–4 billion over seven years, starting in 2022-23, to accelerate work in closing Indigenous housing gaps as follows:
    • $2.4 billion over five years to support First Nations housing on reserves;
    • $565 million over five years to support housing in First Nations Self Governing and Modern Treaty Holders communities;
    • $845 million over seven years to support housing in Inuit communities; and,
    • $190 million over seven years for housing in Métis communities.
    • "Remote and isolated" First Nations will be receiving $268 million to improve the delivery of health services, and doctors serving rural and remote communities will benefit from a $26 million increase in "loan forgiveness."
    • $227.6 million over two years to maintain "trauma-informed, culturally-appropriate, Indigenous-led services." (Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.6, 4.7, 16.19, 18.25)
  • Advancing Economic Reconciliation in the Natural Resource Sector: Renewal of IAMC-Line 3 and IAMC-TMX (which includes IAMC-TMX Temporary Work Camps & Influx of Workers Initiative) – Natural Resources Canada–$27.9 million over two years, starting in 2022-23; Renewal and Expansion of the Indigenous Partnerships Office (IPO) and the Indigenous Natural Resource Partnerships (INRP) Program – Natural Resources Canada - $103.4 million over five years, starting in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4)
  • Rapid Housing Initiative–Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation–$1.5 billion over two years starting in 2022-2023 (Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.6, 12.4, 16.1, 16.18, 16.19, 18.25)
  • Direct support for those in housing Need–Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation–$475 million in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 4.1, 4.6, 12.4, 16.1, 16.18, 16.19, 18.25)

Justice:

  • Enhanced funding to Support Effective Implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act for Indigenous partners to continue to collaborate on the implementation of the Act, including the development, implementation and monitoring of an action plan–Justice Canada with Natural Resources Canada and Department of National Defense–$65.8 million over five years, starting in 2022-23, and $11 million ongoing; $9.5M over five years (DND) (Call for Justice 1.2v)
  • Funding for increased Criminal Legal Aid supports–Justice Canada–$60 Million in 2023-24 to increase the federal contribution to criminal legal aid services (Call for Justice 5.13)
  • Increase in public education and outreach activities in collaboration with the Government of Nunavut to increase awareness and accessibility for the process of making complaints against the RCMP, including making complaints in Inuktitut, and Labrador Inuktitut,–Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP (CRCC)–funding TBC (Calls for Justice 1.6, 2.1, 5.5, 9.2ii, 16.2, 16.3, and 16.43)

Organizational Capacity and Coordination:

  • Advancing a National Action Plan to End Gender-Based Violence–Women and Gender Equality Canada–$539.3 million over five years, starting in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 1.5, 1.6; Call for Miskotahâ 5)
  • Federal LGBTQ2 Action Plan –Women and Gender Equality Canada–$100 million over five years starting in 2022-23
  • Increased funding to implement the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, for Indigenous communities for coordination agreement discussions to support the exercise of First Nations, Inuit and Métis jurisdiction in relation to child and family services as well as funding for internal and resources to support Indigenous communities- $87.3 million over three-to-five years, starting in 2022-23 (Calls for Justice 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.6)
  • A new Child and Family Services model designed and implemented by the Cowessess First Nation to support Cowessess First Nations' exercise of jurisdiction – Indigenous Services Canada–$38.7 million over the next two years (Calls for Justice 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and more broadly 12.6, 12.7, 12.11)
  • In addition to increased funding to implement the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth, and families, $340.8 million over ten years will flow to support a new Child and Family Services model designed by Wabaseemoong Independent Nations and to support their exercise of jurisdiction over child and family services overall starting in 2021-22 (Calls for Justice 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and more broadly 12.6, 12.7, 12.11)

Budget 2022 investments will further allow federal departments, with the guidance of Indigenous partners, to move forward on these initiatives towards the closing of remaining gaps, and pursue additional federal commitments in response to the National Inquiry Report's Calls for Justice, and Calls for Miskotahâ.

Conclusion

Over the past year, and since the launch of the Federal Pathway, federal organizations have been working diligently to fulfill their commitments. In closing this report for 2021-22, the Government of Canada sincerely appreciates the continuing guidance of Indigenous partners. We reiterate our support and respect for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, who experience and have suffered from violence and who were, and continue to be, so cruelly taken from their loved ones. We continue to acknowledge the strength and resilience of Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, family members, friends and survivors, and the communities who support them, including their central role in the ongoing fight for justice.

Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people have the right to be safe, and the Government of Canada is committed to doing its part to ensure that its programs and services meet the needs of those who they are intended to serve. To do so, the federal government, its departments and agencies will engage in ongoing discussions with Indigenous partners, families and survivors to strengthen their collaborative work together, to further identify areas of future work, and to monitor the successful implementation of new federal initiatives moving forward in the next fiscal year.

The Government of Canada remains committed to the vision agreed to within the National Action Plan: a transformed Canada where Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, wherever they are, live free from violence, and are celebrated, honoured, respected, valued, treated equitably, safe, and secure.

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