Departmental Results Report 2018–19

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Table of contents

Ministers’ message

We are honoured to jointly present the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) 2018–19 Departmental Results Report. The report reflects the changes we are making in the way we work with Indigenous peoples based on the affirmation of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.

Existing departmental structures were unsuited to support Indigenous peoples’ distinct circumstances and aspirations. CIRNAC is taking a new approach to working in partnership with First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples in a manner that affirms and implements their rights, their visions of self-determination and addresses shared priorities. This approach facilitates the co-development of proposals that support and better respond to the unique visions of communities.

In 2018-19, we continued the Permanent Bilateral Mechanism meetings to advance the nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relationships, where distinctions-based priorities and policies are co-developed and progress is monitored. This work will continue as an important part of our renewed relationship.

During the past year, we worked together with Indigenous, provincial, and territorial partners to complete the co-development of Canada’s Arctic and Northern Policy Framework, a long-term, strategic vision for Canada’s Arctic and North. We will continue to build on these partnerships to co-develop initiatives for the North with Northerners and make the necessary investments to protect the land, support healthy communities, respect the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples, and nurture a strong, diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy.

Change is happening. Indigenous voices are being heard. However, we know we can do more and we will do more. Working in partnership with Indigenous peoples, we will continue to accelerate our renewed relationship, work together on building a National Action Plan for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, advance work in the North, and decolonize institutional structures and governance to support self-determination and honour existing treaties and self-government agreements.

 

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

 

The Honourable Daniel Vandal, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Northern Affairs

Results at a glance

Total actual spending: $4,431,657,305
Total full-time equivalents: 3,287
Core Responsibilities Actual Spending Full-time Equivalents
Rights and Self-Determination $3,384,512,145 1,119
Community and Regional Development $811,942,939 864
Internal Services $235,202,221 1,304

CIRNAC was created to better meet the needs of Indigenous peoples by accelerating self-determination and closing socio-economic gaps, while advancing reconciliation.

On July 18, 2018, the Prime Minister created the new position of Minister of Northern Affairs to help address the specific challenges and emerging opportunities of Northerners. The addition of a new Minister with a special focus on northern affairs has enabled a doubling of efforts and more work with partners to achieve our distinct mandates of creating lasting and impactful changes for Indigenous peoples and Northerners across Canada.

The department continues to work towards advancing meaningful reconciliation and accelerating the renewal of the Crown's relationship with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership. As well, CIRNAC continues to lead the Government's work in the North in cooperation with territorial, provincial and Indigenous partners.

CIRNAC and Indigenous peoples worked together to achieve progress in the following 3 priorities: accelerating the renewal of the relationship with Indigenous peoples; modernizing institutional structures and governance to support self-determination; and advancing work in the North.

Accelerating the renewal of the relationship with Indigenous peoples

  • Held over 100 engagement sessions with nearly 1,700 First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples to hear their thoughts on what should be included in future federal legislation and policy as part of the Government of Canada's commitment to basing its relationship with Indigenous peoples on the recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights.
  • Fully implemented 9 Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, which fall under federal or shared purview, 54 are well underway and 13 are in early planning stages, as of September 2019.
  • Marked, on December 1, 2018, an important milestone with the taking of effect of the Sixties Scoop (Status Indians and Inuit) settlement agreement. In March 2019, the Minister and representative plaintiffs announced that the parties had reached a proposed settlement of the McLean Indian Day Schools litigation and in August 2019, the Federal Court approved the settlement agreement.
  • Worked in a tripartite forum with the First Nations Summit (a representative organization of First Nations in British Columbia treaty negotiations) and British Columbia to co-develop the Recognition and Reconciliation of Rights Policy for Treaty Negotiations in British Columbia, including approaches to promote the co-development of mandates; advance self-determination and co-existence of jurisdictions; and address the recognition and implementation of title in the context of treaty negotiations in British Columbia.

Modernizing institutional structures and governance to support self-determination

  • Continued to engage with First Nations to explore shared priorities and co-develop mandates, advance interests in fostering self-determination as well as negotiate Self-Government Agreements.
    • As of March 31, 2019, 142 active negotiations were underway with Indigenous communities across the country to co-develop proposals that better address First Nations, Inuit and Métis needs and priorities. These negotiations represent 480 First Nations, 42 communities in which Inuit live, and 9 Métis groups across the country, with a total population of over 890 000 individuals.
  • Co-developed a proposal, through the Assembly of First Nations—Canada Joint Technical Working Group on Specific Claims, to take a more collaborative approach to the resolution of specific claims.
  • Helped identify and review joint priorities, further the co-development of policies and monitor progress through the First Nations bilateral mechanism, the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee and the Métis bilateral mechanism.

Advancing work in the North

  • Launched the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework on September 10, 2019. In 2018–19, the Framework was co-developed and co-drafted with territorial and provincial partners as well as with representatives of northern Indigenous governments and organizations, including: Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, representatives from Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut and the Inuvialuit Settlement Area, as well as northern First Nations and Métis leadership. Further engagement was completed to revise and validate the goals and objectives of the draft Framework.
  • Continued to work with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. to advance devolution in Nunavut.
  • Continued to update and expand the Nutrition North Canada Program, in consultation with northern communities.

For more information on CIRNAC's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of the report.

Results: what we achieved

Rights and Self-Determination

Description

Support Indigenous and northern organizations, individuals, communities and governments in controlling and managing their own affairs and interests based on the recognition and honouring of rights, respect, collaboration and partnerships. Activities include: governance capacity and community planning, negotiating and implementing treaties, self-government agreements and specific claims; addressing historic grievances; consulting and engaging on issues of importance to First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners as well as registration, estates, trust moneys administration and implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Results

In 2018–19, the department focused on the following 3 Departmental Results:

1. Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development

The Government of Canada recognizes that all relations with Indigenous peoples need to be based on the recognition and implementation of their right to self-determination, including the inherent right of self-government. In 2018–19, the department achieved the following:

  • Held over 100 engagement sessions with nearly 1,700 First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples to hear their thoughts on what should be included in future federal legislation and policy as part of the Government of Canada's commitment to basing its relationship with Indigenous peoples on the recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights. The department is committed to meaningful engagement and co-developing rights-based initiatives with Indigenous peoples. For example, in British Columbia, the Government of Canada worked collaboratively with the First Nations Summit and Government of British Columbia to co-develop a policy that will more effectively address the rights, interests and priorities of those First Nations negotiating in the British Columbia Treaty process.
  • Supported the drafting of legislation to dissolve the department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and create 2 new departments, better designed to meet the needs of Indigenous peoples:
    • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, to advance nation-to-nation, Inuit–Crown, and government-to-government relationships; support Indigenous peoples' vision of self-determination; and lead the work of the Government of Canada in the North
    • Indigenous Services Canada, which will improve access to high-quality services for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples; support and empower Indigenous peoples to increase Indigenous control over the delivery of those services; and improve the socio–economic conditions, quality of life, and safety in their communities
    The legislation was introduced in Parliament in April 2019 and received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019.
  • Continued to support the Permanent Bilateral Mechanisms with the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the 4 Inuit Nunangat Regions, and the Métis National Council and its' governing members to make progress in addressing key social, economic, cultural, and environmental issues through 14 meetings between key federal Cabinet ministers and Indigenous leaders to advance joint priorities. Some key results are: the signing of the co-developed Métis Nation Housing Sub-Accord in July 2018; the Statement of Apology to the Inuit by the Prime Minister for the management of the Tuberculosis Epidemic from the 1940s to the 1960s in March 2019; endorsing of the co-developed Inuit Nunangat Housing Strategy in November 2018; the co-development of Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, which was introduced in February 2019 and received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019.
    • Canada signed a political accord on December 5, 2018, with the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, who represent off-reserve Status and non-Status Indians, NunatuKavut Inuit and Métis peoples, to identify joint priorities and co-develop policy to improve socio-economic conditions.
    • Canada also signed an Accord with the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC) on February 1, 2019. The Accord is the formalization of a relationship process that sets out how the Government of Canada and NWAC will work together to ensure the voices of Indigenous women in Canada are reflected in all federal policy, program and legislation in Canada.
  • Held the second Canada–Modern Treaty and Self Governing Forum on January 8, 2019. From this forum, 3 key priorities were raised with the Prime Minister and were shared with the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee Land Claims Implementation Working Group:
    • The creation of an Implementation Policy
    • The creation of a Modern Treaties Implementation Review Commission
    • Amendments to the Interpretation Act to include a non-derogation clause
    The department will continue to work with partners in 2019–20 to develop options in these key priority areas.
  • Continued to engage in self-government negotiations and discussions with Indigenous communities. As of March 31, 2019, 142 active negotiations were underway with Indigenous communities across the country to co-develop proposals that better address First Nations, Inuit and Métis needs and priorities. These included 54 Modern Treaty and Self-Government negotiations, 79 Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination negotiations and 9 other negotiation processes; representing 480 First Nations, 42 Inuit communities and 9 Métis groups across the country, with a total population of over 890 000 individuals. Specifically, the department:
    • Continued to advance reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities through the signing of Agreements-in-Principle, preliminary-type relationship agreements such as Memorandum of Understanding (MOUs) and Letters of Understanding (LOUs), and other constructive arrangements. In 2018–19 CIRNAC co-developed and signed 38 preliminary agreements, 3 Agreements-in-Principle, and 2 agreements:
      • The first agreement is an interim fiscal agreement with the Manitoba Metis Federation (MMF) which will be used to support the social, cultural and economic well-being of the Métis community in Manitoba.
      • The second agreement is the Anishinabek Nation Education Agreement which recognized 23 Anishinabek First Nations' jurisdiction over Kindergarten to Grade 12 education. The Education Agreement marked the first Governance Agreement in Ontario, and due to the number of participating First Nations, the largest Education self-government agreement in Canada. The enabling legislation, the Anishinabek Nation Education Agreement Act (Bill C-61), came into force on April 1, 2018. The Act created the Anishinabek Education System, a system designed by Anishinabek First Nations for Anishinabek students, to deliver culturally relevant and community-tailored education programs and services for the benefit of current and future generations.
    • CIRNAC settled 3 historic grievances in 2018–19 which represent significant milestones in the Crown-Indigenous relationship:
      • The Lubicon Lake Band land claim settlement agreement was signed on October 24, 2018. The resolution of this historic grievance includes the transfer of provincial Crown land for reserve, the development of community infrastructure and financial compensation. The Lubicon Lake Band was missed from treaty-making in 1899 due to their remote location.
      • The settlement and apology to the Ahiarmiut brought a measure of closure for the community regarding a series of forced relocation in the 1950s, and was a momentous step towards reconciliation.
      • The settlement and apology to the 7 Williams Treaties First Nations, which was a tripartite agreement, resolved a 95-year-old claim which was the subject of 20 years of extremely complex litigation.
  • Continued working in partnership with the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba and the Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan. These Commissions continued to advance greater understanding and awareness of historic treaties; increased partnerships; and supported reconciliation through a number of initiatives. These initiatives included: treaty education in public schools and training for teachers; treaty awareness sessions with private industry and the general public; facilitated discussions on treaty issues; and, research and publications.
    • In British Columbia, the federal government continued to work in partnership with the Province and the First Nations Summit to improve, expedite and transform treaty negotiation. CIRNAC continued the work to implement proposals made in the report on the "Multilateral Engagement Process to Improve and Expedite Treaty Negotiations in British Columbia", endorsed by the Principals to the British Columbia treaty process in May 2016. On December 1, 2018, the Principals signed the Principals' Accord on Transforming Treaty Negotiations in British Columbia as a demonstration of commitment to transformative change beyond the Multilateral Engagement process. This Accord signals that the Crown and First Nations are committed to removing impediments to treaty negotiations in British Columbia and affirms an approach based on recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights, rather than extinguishment. In September 2019, the Recognition and Reconciliation of Rights Policy for treaty negotiations in British Columbia was released. The new policy will enable flexible, innovative and collaborative approaches that improve how treaties are reached in British Columbia.
  • Advanced issues relating to Indian registration, band membership and First Nation citizenship, by launching a Collaborative Process on June 12, 2018. This inclusive and flexible Process provided an opportunity to consult with a total of 14,310 people across Canada on these issues, including the removal of the 1951 cut-off from the Indian Act as required under Bill S-3.
    • Claudette Dumont-Smith, as the appointed Minister's Special Representative (MSR), led a total of 15 regional events with First Nation representatives. In addition, 179 First Nations and Indigenous groups received funding, which resulted in 420 community sessions and 3,304 individuals participated in an online survey, which facilitated the sharing of their input into the Collaborative Process. This Process concluded on March 31, 2019. A final report on the consultations was tabled in Parliament on June 12, 2019. This report included the MSR report and recommendations for the next steps. Amendments in Bill S-3 to remove the 1951 cut-off were brought into force on August 15, 2019. All known sex-based inequities in the Indian Act have now been addressed.
  • Began implementing, in collaboration with other government departments and key Indigenous partners, in December 2018, a series of measures to address the border crossing concerns of Indigenous Peoples identified in the 2017 Report on First Nation Border Crossing Issues by the Minister's Special Representative, Fred Caron. These measures included the addition of a machine-readable zone to the Secure Certificate of Indian Status to facilitate Canada-U.S. border crossing, and a commitment to a longer-term distinctions-based process to explore with Indigenous partners potential solutions to a number of more complex border crossing issues, relating, for example, to mobility and identification.
  • Continued collaborating with Self-Governing Indigenous Governments through the Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process, which commenced in May 2016, with regular meetings over the reporting period. A draft policy framework was completed on December 2018, along with several co-developed funding formulas supporting the policy framework for new approaches to governance funding, capital replacement and repairs, and culture, language and heritage.
    • Discussions are expected to continue with Self-Governing Indigenous Governments over the coming years to complete components of the framework including: culture, language and heritage; lands and resources; infrastructure and housing; and, programs and services.
  • Developed and implemented the Nation Rebuilding Program, investing $100 million over the next 5 years in Indigenous communities to help reconstitute themselves as nations and create institutions with the breadth and capacity to take on the exercise of rights, including self-government.
  • Continued to work with Indigenous organizations, provinces and territories, and Northerners to co-develop Canada's Arctic and Northern Policy Framework. This included intensive collaborative drafting through weekly meetings and targeted engagements between April and December 2018. Review and validation engagements on the draft goals and objectives were completed in January and February 2019, with meetings held across the Arctic and North with a wide range of partners and stakeholders. The Framework was launched on September 10, 2019, and since then, a number of Territorial and Indigenous chapters were also launched by co-development partners. These chapters articulate the priorities and aspirations of co-development partners, and will inform ongoing collaboration.
2. Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions

Renewal of the nation-to-nation, government-to-government, and Inuit-Crown relationships, including treaty relationships, includes putting in place effective mechanisms to support the transition away from colonial systems of administration and governance through support to Indigenous peoples and Northerners to advance their governance institutions. In 2018–19, the department:

  • Supported the amendment of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act, through Bill C-86, which received Royal Assent in December 2018. The amendments, which were developed as part of the ongoing collaboration and consultation with the 3 First Nation-led institutions (First Nations Financial Management Board, First Nations Tax Commission, and the First Nations Finance Authority), simplified and clarified provisions in the Act and extended access to Indigenous organizations and additional First Nations.
    • Strengthened the operations of the 3 First Nation-led institutions through Budget 2018 investment of $50 million over 5 years and $11 million ongoing. This investment will support these institutions in responding to the increasing demand for their expertise and services from First Nations. The department also continued to explore options for alternative financing mechanisms with the First Nations Finance Authority.
    • Advanced the First Nations Infrastructure Institution concept, in collaboration with the First Nations Infrastructure Institution Development Board and technical working group, through consultations with First Nations and Indigenous financial organizations, identifying potential demonstration projects and developing options for the way forward.
  • Supported amendments to the First Nations Land Management Act (FNLMA), through Bill C-86, which provide First Nation communities with more flexibility and control over their ratification processes, jointly held reserves, additions-to-reserve, and revenue and capital monies, once they have ratified their community-developed land code. The FNLMA is the first piece of federal legislation enacted to reference Canada's endorsement of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
  • Continued to support the addition of signatories to the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management and the FNLMA. As of March 31, 2019, there were 164 First Nation communities who are now signatories, 78 of whom were operational and had developed community-approved land codes and law-making authority. Being operational enables communities to opt-out of 44 sections of the Indian Act related to the management of land, environment, and natural resources. Budget 2018 invested $143.5 million to support 50 additional First Nations in becoming signatories to the Framework Agreement by 2023.
  • Continued to support the establishment of land governance regimes, either through the FNLMA or Self-Government agreements. As of March 31, 2019, 18% of First Nations have established land governance regimes. The 24% target was not met due to a few reasons: some First Nations experienced delays in developing their land codes and many First Nations were not able to meet the voting requirements to their proposed land codes. The recent amendments made to the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management and the FNLMA, in addition to Budget 2018 investments, are expected to generate an increase in the number of First Nations with established land governance regimes in 2019–20.
  • Supported the on-going work of the Centre of Excellence for Matrimonial Real Property and First Nations in developing their own matrimonial real property laws. Through the national engagement on matrimonial real property on-reserve, First Nations provided concrete examples to illustrate their issues and needs. Budget 2018 provided investments of $5.5 million over the next 2 years to begin to address some of these issues and needs. The department also invested in new, more targeted training and awareness activities to address gaps identified through the national engagement and program evaluation in the administration and enforcement of the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act. Findings from the national engagement are continuing to inform options for future program direction.
  • Continued to support Northerners in advancing their governance institutions. The Nunavut Devolution negotiation process is currently ongoing. During this reporting period, 8 Tripartite Main Table meetings occurred between the Government of Canada, Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated to help foster the discussions between involved parties, and to develop an Agreement-in-Principle, which sets out a framework for negotiating the terms of transfer of lands and resources to the Government of Nunavut.
  • Continued to support nation-to-nation relationships with Indigenous peoples through a whole-of-government approach by providing executive oversight of the implementation of the Cabinet Directive on the Federal Approach to Modern Treaty Implementation via the Deputy Minister's Oversight Committee. In 2018–19, the Committee met 5 times, with Indigenous partners participating in 4 meetings.
    • Completed, in co-operation with modern Treaty partners, a redesign of the Modern Treaty Implementation training. There were 5 training sessions delivered to 112 federal officials in the National Capital Region, British Columbia, and Nunavut. Additional training on completing an Assessment of Modern Treaty Implications was provided to 58 federal officials. This training supports the successful implementation of modern treaties.
    • Assisted other federal departments with the development of 96 Assessments of Modern Treaty Implications.
  • Continued to provide policy and operational guidance as well as responded to information requests regarding Indigenous consultation and accommodation issues including the principle of free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) in the context of the duty to consult. Through the number of requests of advice received by the department, an increase in the interest for guidance on FPIC was noticed and such guidance will be included when updating the Guidelines for Federal Officials to Fulfill the Duty to Consult.
3. Past injustices are recognized and resolved

Assimilationist policies and practices have led to the denial of Indigenous rights. The Government of Canada is committed to reconciliation as an ongoing process which requires the recognition of rights, acknowledgement of past wrongs, including the disenfranchisement of women under the Indian Act, and working together to co-develop solutions with Indigenous peoples. In 2018–19, the department:

  • Continued to support and advance the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 76 Calls to Actions which are under shared or federal purview. As of September 2019, 9 Calls to Action have been fully implemented, 54 are well underway and 13 are in early planning stages. The Government of Canada reports on how it is responding to the Calls to Action, transparently, through periodic updates on a dedicated webpage.
  • Continued to implement the 2016 Policy on Additions to Reserve/Reserve Creation, which streamlines the processing of Addition-to-Reserve proposals. The Policy divides the process into 4 clear phases with an overarching focus on project management. This provides for early collaboration with implicated stakeholders and the First Nation. Specifically, the new policy requires a Letter of Support early in the process that clearly outlines conditions to be resolved, before Ministerial consideration, for adding the land to reserve. Canada is continuing to work with the National Addition-to-Reserves Advisory Committee to continue to identify improvements to the process.
    • The number of hectares of land added to the reserve land base to fulfill legal obligations was lower than the target in 2018–19 (13,906 hectares vs. 37,474 hectares). The deviation was a result of First Nations prioritizing smaller parcels in urban areas that have economic development potential. As these often have a greater number of third party interests, they are more complex and take additional time to process. There are also long-standing issues (e.g. hydro easements, mines and mineral interests) to be addressed and once resolved will unlock thousands of acres of Treaty Land Entitlement land in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Economic analysis that supports the increased economic benefits of urban parcels of land include the January 2019 report, Indigenous Contributions to the Manitoba Economy.
  • Co-developed a proposal, through the Assembly of First Nations—Canada Joint Technical Working Group on Specific Claims, to take a more collaborative approach to the resolution of specific claims. A key element of the response to this proposal was the announcement in Budget 2019 of additional funding to support First Nations' research and development of specific claims, and the renewal an replenishment of the Specific Claims Settlement Fund.
  • Continued to work on resolving disputes, with Indigenous peoples, outside of the courts, including the implementation of healing and commemoration activities, as part of the Newfoundland and Labrador Residential Schools settlement. From February to May 2018, 10 community healing and commemoration sessions occurred (9 in Newfoundland and Labrador and 1 in Ontario). December 1, 2018, marked the implementation of the Sixties Scoop (Status Indians and Inuit) settlement agreement and in March 2019, the Minister and representative plaintiffs announced that the parties had reached a proposed settlement of the McLean Indian Day Schools litigation. Both settlements include the establishment of organizations to support healing, wellness, education, language, culture and commemoration.
  • Worked in partnership with Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat (the independent, arm's-length organization mandated with the implementation of the Independent Assessment Process), Service Canada and ISC to continue implementing and fulfilling the terms of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. Specifically, in 2018–19, the department:
    • Led the joint process of ensuring funding availability for Independent Assessment Process operations and Common Experience Payments in anticipation of the Kivalliq Hall implementation order and collaborated with Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and the Kivalliq Inuit Association on strategies to maximize community participation in the Common Experience Payments.
    • Worked with ISC to ensure continued access to mental health and emotional support services for former Residential School students and their families.

In 2018–19, the Adjudication Secretariat:

  • Completed all remaining first claimant hearings for ongoing Independent Assessment Process claims, a significant milestone for the Process.
  • Launched the court-ordered, nationwide Notice Program to inform claimants of their rights to direct whether their Independent Assessment Process documents be archived at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, provided to them individually, or destroyed.
Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Actual results
Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development Percentage of First Nations adopting alternatives to the Indian Act 49% by March 31, 2019 50%a
Number of communities where Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination processes are underway 502 by March 31, 2019 509
Number of communities where Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination agreements have been concluded 54 by March 31, 2019 54
Percentage of First Nations that exercise options to collect, manage and/or access revenues held in trust To be determinedb 26%c
Percentage of Arctic Council initiatives that correlate to or advance Canadian Indigenous Permanent Participants' priorities 100% by March 31, 2019 100%
Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions Percentage of First Nation communities with Financial Management System Certification through the First Nations Financial Management Board 1.6% by March 31, 2019 2.9%
Percentage of First Nation communities with land governance regimes established 24% by March 31, 2019 18%
Percentage of First Nation communities with real property taxation regimes supported through the First Nations Tax Commission 20% by March 31, 2019 21.4%
Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut Full completion
by March 2023d
Adjusted target
Past injustices are recognized and resolved The annual percentage of specific claims accepted for negotiation that are resolved by means of a negotiated settlement agreement 50% by March 31, 2019 74.5%e
Hectares of land added to the reserve land base to fulfill legal obligations 37,474 by March 31, 2019 13,906f
Percentage of Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement claims completed through the Independent Assessment Process 100% by March 31, 2020 99.8%
Number of litigation claims concluded Not availableg 16h

a 15 First Nations opted into the First Nations Election Act; 78 First Nations are operational under the First Nations Land Management Act, and 0 First Nations opted into First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act.
b A target of 20% by March 31, 2019 was established in 2018–19 following data availability.
c The percentage represents 147 out of 558 First Nations' accounts that had a positive balance as of March 31, 2019.
d The target has been adjusted as the department continues to engage and progress with partners towards the completion of devolution phases at a mutually agreed upon pace. The completion of the devolution phases in Nunavut is now targeted to be completed in 2024–25.
e 59 claims were accepted for negotiation and 44 settlements claims were resolved by means of a negotiated settlement.
f The deviation was a result of First Nations prioritizing smaller parcels in urban areas that have economic development potential.
g This indicator addresses resolution of litigation and/or out-of-court settlements as they occur. As the department has no control on the amount or the timing of resolved claims, the target cannot be established.
h 16 litigation claims, totalling settlements of $203,209,334 were concluded out of court.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
2,232,915,663 2,232,915,663 3,976,092,844 3,384,512,145 1,151,596,482

The difference (+$1.2 billion) between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and Budget Implementation Vote for:

  • the settlement of special claims under the Williams Treaties (+$666.0 million)
  • the specific claims settlements (+$355.5 million)
  • the Sixties Scoop settlement (+$155.0 million)
  • the implementation of a renewed relationship with the Manitoba Métis Federation (+$129.2 million)
  • the out of court settlements (+$108.2 million)
  • the New Fiscal Relationship: Collaboration with Self-Governing Indigenous Governments (Budget 2018) (+$48.8 million)
  • the Métis Nation Housing Strategy and Métis Nation Heritage Centre (+$48.4 million)
  • the Negotiation Support Funding Program (+$43.4 million)
  • the infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (+$42.5 million)

This increase is offset by the deferral of funds that were not required in 2018–19 such as:

  • specific claims settlements (-$413.8 million)
  • Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (-$91.3 million)
  • out of court settlement (-$47.0 million)
  • Sixties Scoops settlement (-$17.9 million)

These funds will be re-profiled to future years when they would be available for their intended purposes.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19 Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
1,021 1,119 98
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents (FTEs) primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to address sex-based inequities in Indian status registration and to continue to fulfill Canada's obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. FTEs related to these initiatives were not included in the Planned.

Financial, human resources and performance information for CIRNAC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Community and Regional Development

Description

Support the efforts of Indigenous and northern communities in sustainable economic development, sustainable food, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: investment in Indigenous and northern entrepreneurs and businesses; land management and resource development; clean energy development and climate change adaptation; remediation of contaminated sites; and protection of the Arctic ecosystems and advancement of northern (Arctic) science and technology.

Results

In 2018–19, the department focused on the following 3 Departmental Results:

1. Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth

The department supports Indigenous and northern communities in advancing their economic development by investing in community readiness, entrepreneurs and businesses, land management, and strategic partnerships. In 2018–19, the department achieved the following results:

  • Leveraged access to $117 million in new capital for the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network by collaborating with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association.
    • Budget 2019 announced up to $100 million to establish an Indigenous Growth Fund to encourage investment by Aboriginal Financial Institutions, which will lead to better support for the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network and Indigenous entrepreneurs.
  • Continued to support the National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB) in advancing its' innovative policy agenda which focuses on Indigenous Economic Reconciliation, the launch of the Northern Sustainable Food Systems Recommendations Report, and progress on Indigenous women's entrepreneurship.
  • Supported the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on the Canadian portion of its research project: Linking Indigenous Communities to Regional Development. Facilitated several case study missions and interactions with Indigenous communities and organizations which allowed the OECD to have meaningful dialogue and gather pertinent information for their final report.
    • The NIEDB also participated in the aforementioned OECD project by helping to create a platform for exchange of best practices and experiences between Indigenous community leaders, policy makers and experts; providing a diagnosis of the development potential of different Indigenous communities; highlighting best practices; and, recommending improvements regarding policies for Indigenous communities. This depth of Indigenous involvement in this project is critical for its success.
  • Contributed to the Government of Canada's procurement modernization agenda by sending a letter from CIRNAC and Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) to departments and agencies challenging them to increasing the amounts set aside for Indigenous business to a level of 5% over the next 5 years and engaging with Indigenous businesses, associations and organizations to modernize Indigenous procurement policy via regional roundtables, design-thinking workshops and a national on-line process.
  • Worked with key Indigenous partners, such as the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada (ITAC), the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, the Native Women's Association of Canada and Indigenous Works to develop and implement international, national, and regional strategies to support business and economic development. In 2018–19, the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship program (AEP) funded 19 projects with a value of over $5.0 million.
    • With AEP funding support, ITAC has successfully undertaken a number of initiatives, including: the National Aboriginal Tourism Research Report, which identified key challenges and opportunities for the Indigenous tourism industry, and the Path Forward, a 5-year strategy aimed at increasing the profile of the industry and its contributions to the Canadian economy.
    • In November 2018, the AEP funded an Indigenous social finance stream at the MaRS Social Finance Conference where Indigenous social finance leaders shared practical tools and insights on how Indigenous peoples and governments have developed social finance approaches. The Conference also organized a roundtable with more than 30 Indigenous people and Government officials to discuss social finance and how Indigenous organizations and government can build capacity.
  • Supported large-scale commercial and industrial projects in First Nation and Inuit communities through the provision of project funding to pursue economic opportunities and leverage access to private sector resources. In 2018–19, 24 projects in 23 communities with populations ranging from 315 to 11,593 (total population of 63,118), were funded for an investment of $19.5 million. Project types included: projects to address economic infrastructure (e.g. incubator park infrastructure and highway development infrastructure); equity gaps (e.g. wind farm acquisition); and economic opportunities (e.g. establishment of a travel centre, construction of feta cheese processing plant, hotel construction). Budget 2019 invests a further $78.9 million over 5 years, starting in 2019–20, with $15.8 million per year ongoing, to support First Nation and Inuit community-owned businesses and the construction of community economic infrastructure through the Community Opportunity Readiness Program.
    • Regulations were updated under the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act to enable the development and operation of a diversion-type hydroelectric facility on the Black Lake First Nation reserve lands in northern Saskatchewan.
  • Modernized Indian Oil and Gas Regulations were pre-published in the May 19, 2018 Canada Gazette Part I for public comment. As a result of feedback, accommodations were made. The new Indian Oil and Gas Regulations were approved in June 10, 2019 and came into force on August 1, 2019. During 2018–19, $55 million was collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nations as a result of oil and gas development on First Nation lands.
  • Worked, in partnership with the National Aboriginal Land Managers Association, to conduct a joint technical review of the Indian Referendum Regulations. Based on a series of roundtable discussions with National Aboriginal Land Managers Association members, an assessment of the Regulations was co-developed and a number of potential reform options were identified.
  • Supported the development of strategic joint economic development plans between municipalities and neighbouring communities through the Community Economic Development Initiative. This has resulted in 15 partnerships involving 25 First Nation communities (total population of 40,697) and 23 municipalities (total population of 1,852,137), across Canada for an annual investment of $650,000. For example:
    • Fort William First Nation and the City of Thunder Bay, Ontario are collaborating on the development of the Fort William Industrial park, located on Fort William First Nation lands. Planning departments and staff of the City of Thunder Bay, the First Nation and Thunder Bay economic development corporations are jointly leveraging provincial and federal funds for this project, given the potential to attract business to the Thunder Bay region. It is estimated that more than 250 jobs will be created for the First Nation.
    • Okanagan Indian Band and the City of Vernon, British Columbia have signed and celebrated a Friendship accord and terms of reference have been completed for a joint working group.
  • Continued to implement the Métis Nation Economic Development Strategy announced in Budget 2016, including the monitoring of recapitalization with the 5 Métis Capital Corporations and launching the Métis Financial Corporation of British Columbia, the first Métis Capital Corporation in that province. Collaboration on a joint tourism initiative and joint strategic waterfront plan is now underway. Budget 2019 provided $50 million to recapitalize the 5 Métis Capital Corporations.
  • Supported the Matawa First Nations, located in Ontario, in co-designing a collective decision making framework, and supported the Community Well-being pilot project working with Neskantaga, Webequie, and Marten Falls First Nations to accelerate improvements in housing, training, governance, and financial administration. In July 2019, Webequie and Marten Falls formally commenced the federal environmental assessment process as proponents of an all-season north-south access corridor to the Ring of Fire, and along with Aroland First Nation, have entered into development agreements with Noront Resources Ltd., the major mining proponent in the region.
2. Indigenous and northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments

Indigenous and northern communities face many challenges that demand the capacity to adapt to changing environments. These include: managing the impacts of a changing climate, addressing the high and often fluctuating costs of food, and promoting sustainable development that balances environmental, social, and economic well-being. Other important factors include: remoteness and inaccessibility, cold climate, aging and inefficient infrastructure, flooding, reliance on diesel for electricity generation, and space heating. In 2018–19, the department achieved the following results:

  • Funded more than 200 projects via the Indigenous Community-Based Climate Monitoring Program (63 projects), the First Nation Adapt Program (73 projects), and the Climate Change Preparedness in the North Program (112 projects) to help increase the resilience of Indigenous and northern communities through the identification of adaptation risks and adaptation measures. The department's investments of $25.9 million supported 369 Indigenous and northern communities across Canada to:
    • monitor climate change impacts to inform community adaptation actions
    • support vulnerability assessments, cost-benefit analysis and the development of floodplain maps in First Nation communities and traditional lands
    • support risk assessments and adaptation planning, and implementing structural and non-structural adaptation measures

NNC continues to post compliance reviews, shipping reports, and Revised Northern Food Basket price reports on the Program's website.

  • Began to implement, as of January 1, 2019, improvements to Nutrition North Canada (NNC), that were informed by consultations with Northerners. These improvements, when fully implemented, will include: a fully revised subsidized food list that is now more relevant to Northerners, and which includes a focus on northern staples and family-friendly items; a new highest-level subsidy rate specifically for milk, frozen fruit, frozen vegetables, infant formula, and infant food; and an increase to the 2 current subsidy rates to help further lower the cost of perishable, nutritious food.
    • During the engagement process, Northerners made it clear that support for country/traditional food should be provided through separate and complementary programming. In response, a Harvesters Support Grant was announced in the fall of 2018, which has been co-developed with Indigenous partners. The government is in the process of creating the grant, which will become a third distinct component to the existing NNC.
    • NNC continues to engage with key stakeholders on how the program can be more responsive to the needs of Northerners and Indigenous peoples. NNC launched an Indigenous Working Group in May 2017, which ensures that the unique interests, priorities and circumstances of First Nations and Métis are acknowledged, affirmed, and implemented. As of December 2018, NNC also began participating in the newly created Inuit-Crown Food Security Working Group, a distinctions-based platform specific to Inuit interests, to continue to update the program.
  • Supported local, national and international initiatives by providing data and expertise through the Northern Contaminants Program. These initiatives aimed at monitoring, assessing and reducing, or eliminating contaminants mostly found in water and country food consumed by Northerners. Results in 2018–19 included 2 meetings of each of the 5 regional contaminants committees (Yukon, NWT, Nunavut, Nunavik, Nunatsiavut), and 3 meetings of the program's national management committee, the launch of the online Project Discovery Portal, and the release of the Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report, Contaminants in Canada's North: State of Knowledge and Regional Highlights produced under the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), including the AMAP Assessment 2018: Biological Effects of Contaminants on Arctic Wildlife & Fish.
3. Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed

Many remote Indigenous and northern communities are not connected to power grids, and rely on high-cost diesel-powered electrical generation. Investment in alternative energy sources, where possible, can provide reliable, clean energy at a lower cost to Indigenous and northern communities.

In addition, the North has a number of contaminated sites, abandoned by previous occupants that include legacy contamination, primarily from private sector mining, and oil and gas activities as well as military activities by the Government. Land use planning, capacity building and training, enable First Nation communities to effectively manage lands, natural resources and solid waste and environmental activities that will leverage community and economic development opportunities. In 2018–19, the department achieved the following results:

  • Supported Indigenous peoples and Northerners in reducing their reliance on diesel according to the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change.
    • The Northern Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heat and Electricity Program (REACHE) invested $3.9M in 36 projects in 22 communities. The projects focused on bringing proven technologies, such as solar, biomass heating, and LED lighting to communities. The Program also worked closely with regional stakeholders to identify, prioritize and fund projects. Since 2016, clean energy and energy efficiency projects supported by Northern REACHE have reduced diesel consumption by an estimated 263,000 litres, which represents a reduction of over 739,000 kilograms of CO2.
  • Continued to lead and support coordination and integration of federal government policy and programming in the North, including through the management of interdepartmental committees and horizontal initiatives involving more than 25 federal departments and agencies.
  • Created the Northern Participant Funding Program on December 19, 2018, as a part of the department's ongoing commitment to renewing Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples. The Program helps Indigenous peoples and Northerners access the resources and expertise needed to participate effectively in impact assessments of major resource or infrastructure development projects in Canada's North.
  • Continued to support efficient and effective impact assessment regimes and engaged directly on project reviews in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and the Yukon.
  • Continued to support regulatory frameworks in the North, including environmental assessment legislation that yields sound resource management decision making. This includes:
    • In November 2018, Bill C-88, an Act to amend the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act and the Canada Petroleum Resources Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, was introduced in the House of Commons. It received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019.
    • In the context of addressing implementation issues with the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act, departmental officials held on-going discussions with representatives of the Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated and the Nunavut resource management boards over the course of the year.
  • Continued work towards co-developing options to enhance the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program based upon what was heard in the 2017 national engagement with Indigenous organizations and First Nations. In 2018–19, a partnership was established with Algoma University for the delivery of training for land managers in Eastern Canada, in addition to an existing partnership with the University of Saskatchewan for Central Canada. Discussions are ongoing to work towards the delivery of training for land managers in Western Canada starting in May 2020; 28 land managers are expected to be trained in 2019–20.
  • Worked in partnership with the Indian Resource Council of Canada, through a joint technical committee, to modernize Indian Oil and Gas Regulations. The updated Regulations were pre-published on May 19, 2018 in the Canada Gazette Part I for public comments and the feedback received resulted in accommodations. The new Indian Oil and Gas Regulations were approved on June 10, 2019 and came into force as of August 1, 2019.
  • Supported 17 First Nations in completing their land use plans; 45 First Nations to continue with the development of their land-use planning process; and the completion of 97 land survey projects. The department also continued to work with Indigenous organizations to build or enhance their capacity. Close to 60 First Nation practitioners received training in land use planning and surveying via the National Aboriginal Lands Managers Association, 15 land managers were certified in a new land management program delivered by the Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics, and 2 new regional lands associations were created to provide better land support services to First Nations located in Ontario and Manitoba.
  • Continued to make progress on the assessment, care and maintenance, remediation/risk management and monitoring activities of high priority contaminated sites in the territories. Indigenous and northern workers respectively made up 21% and 45% of the total person/hours employed on northern contaminated sites projects, while 32% and 54% of the total contract dollar value awarded for work on these sites was held by Indigenous and northern companies respectively.
    • Indigenous communities participated in the planning phase of these high priority projects through consultations, community engagements, and partnering and capacity building opportunities. For example, the department held meetings with Indigenous representatives in proximity to the Faro Mine site to gather feedback on human health, adaptive management, and water quality monitoring in support of the environmental and socio-economic assessment process. For the Giant Mine site in the Northwest Territories, the department conducted an Archeological Impact Assessment in partnership with the Indigenous stakeholders in the region in order to seek traditional knowledge on the subject. Elders recommended that a larger land area be examined as a part of the assessment, which ensured that the department's work was culturally relevant to the surrounding Indigenous communities.
  • Advanced opportunities for the re-commercialization of abandoned mine sites by leveraging private sector interest in remaining mineral resources at these sites. In Yukon, successful negotiations resulted in the signing of the Mount Nansen Governments Agreement in June 2019. This tripartite agreement between the First Nation, Yukon Government, and Canada solidifies a collaborative relationship on the sale and remediation of the Mount Nansen abandoned mine site. In the Northwest Territories, the department signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the Territorial Government to market the Cantung and Mactung mine site assets.
  • Conducted assessments on 451 sites on reserve and remediation activities on 236 sites, since 2016, for an investment of $174 million. In 2018–19, the program conducted activities on 30.5% of the contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health or safety. The target of 35% was not met due to the limited availability of funding; contracting delays, both with the department and with First Nations, and unfavourable weather which reduced activity on contaminated sites. Steps are being taken to minimize contracting delays in the future and ensure that funding is available early in the fiscal year to address these sites.
  • Continued to support First Nations in improving solid-waste management which is critical to protecting the environment, health and safety of communities. Since 2016, 501 projects in 464 communities representing a population of 411,000 have been completed under the First Nations Waste Management Initiative for a total investment of $203.7 million. The initial years of this critical infrastructure program focussed on the necessary feasibility and planning phases that are part of all infrastructure programs. Projects have now moved into the construction phase and First Nations are entering into agreements.
    • Pilot projects to transfer program delivery to Indigenous organizations were started in 2018–19. The department started working with the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre this year to allow them to develop their own call for proposals and fund community-led solid waste management projects across the country for Framework Agreement communities. First Nations Land Management Resource Centre hired a solid waste coordinator, developed training resources for communities, and disbursed funds to 10 First Nations communities for their solid waste projects. This first year of the pilot, First Nations Land Management Resource Centre received $700,000 to complete this work, and further work is expected in the coming year. A similar project is being undertaken with the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaq to deliver elements of solid waste programming to 8 communities in Atlantic Canada.
  • Established a path forward for the strategic management of Arctic offshore oil and gas resources, including co-developing a strategy for the 5-year science-based review and negotiating of co-management and revenue sharing of Beaufort Sea oil and gas.
  • Committed to a future approach on Arctic offshore oil and gas which will be developed in collaboration with all parties concerned. As part of the next steps, the Government will:
    • freeze the terms of the existing licences in the Arctic offshore to preserve existing rights, remit the balance of any financial deposit related to licences to affected licence holders and suspend any oil and gas activities for the duration of the moratorium
    • work with northern partners to co-develop the scope and governance framework for a science-based, life-cycle impact assessment review every 5 years that takes into account marine and climate change science
    • negotiate a Beaufort Sea oil and gas co-management and revenue-sharing agreement with the governments of the Northwest Territories and Yukon, and the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation
Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target 2018–19
Actual results
Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth Percentage of First Nation communities where non-government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues To be determineda 13%b
Number of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded To be determinedc 1229d
Percentage growth of federal procurement contracts set aside for Indigenous businesses 5% increase by March 31, 2019 To comee
Indigenous and northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments Percentage of Climate Change Impact Assessments that identify adaptation measures 50% by March 31, 2019 To comef
The annual growth rate of food prices in isolated northern communities compared to the national growth rate At or below 2% by March 31, 2019g -0.01%
Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managedh Percentage of contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health and safety where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk 35% y March 31, 2019 30.5%
Percentage of contaminated sites in the North that pose imminent danger to public health and safety and the environment that are being actively managed 81–85%i by March 31, 2019 85%
Percentage of First Nations with land use plans 27% by March 31, 2021 23.6%
Percentage of First Nation communities with certified land managers At least 25% of First Nation communities by March 31, 2019 21%
Percentage of First Nation, Inuit and northern Communities that are dependent on dieselj To be determinedk 73%l
Percentage of First Nation, Inuit and northern Communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on dieselm 20%n of Inuit and northern communitieso by March 31, 2019 58%
Percentage of First Nation communities with adequate solid waste management systems 35% by March 31, 2021 12%

a A target of 16% by March 31, 2019 was determined in-year.
b Results are based on 2017–18 data. Results are preliminary since annual audited financial statements have not yet been received from some First Nations.
c A target cannot be established as the number of applications received yearly by Aboriginal Financial Institutions vary significantly from year to year.
d The number of start-up businesses created was 466. The number of existing businesses expanded was 763.
e Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) collects data for this indicator on an annual (calendar year) basis, with a 2-year lag in publication – for example, results for 2016–17 are now available. CIRNAC is working with PSPC on ways to enable the more timely availability of data, specifically through the updated Electronic Procurement System.
f 2018–19 results will be available in the summer of 2020. In 2017–18, the results were over 80%.
g The target of at or below 2% is measured against the Consumer Price Index for March 2019.
h This result is transitional and reflects a shared responsibility with Indigenous Service Canada, and is subject to change as the new departmental structures are clarified.
i The 81–85% target represents 55–58 out of 68 high-priority sites. The number of high-priority sites varies annually as site activities are completed, responsibility for active management is transferred to third parties, and the department becomes responsible for new sites. The number of actively managed sites will also vary annually as site activities are completed or as sites move into active management.
j This is an interim indicator reflecting a shared responsibility with ISC. ISC reports results on First Nations on reserve south of 60° and CIRNAC reports on Inuit and northern communities.
k The target for this interim indicator is being developed in consultation with partners.
l The percentage of First Nation, Inuit, and northern communities dependent on diesel did not change from the 2017–18 baseline of 73%.
m This is an interim indicator reflecting a shared responsibility with ISC. ISC reports results on First Nations on reserve south of 60° and CIRNAC reports on Inuit and northern communities.
n A notional target of 20% has been established based on project proposals.
o This target is an interim target for 2018–19 and will be reviewed for 2019–20 in consultation with partners.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
646,610,036 646,610,036 872,717,952 811,942,939 165,332,903
The difference (+$165.3 million) between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (+$110.1 million) and from the transfer from ISC to adjust amounts as per the 2017 Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465 (+$42.7 million).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19 Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
856 864 8

Financial, human resources and performance information for the CIRNAC Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

1. Management and Oversight Services

To ensure that programs and services delivered by CIRNAC are relevant, efficient and effective, in 2018–19, the department conducted audits, evaluations, financial investigations and risk assessments.

Special attention was given to identifying, assessing, and responding to the risks that existed with the creation of CIRNAC as a new department. For example, risk analysis work revealed that there was a risk that CIRNAC would not be able to effectively design, operationalize and manage through the changes that are needed to transform the department and implement the Government's agenda. To respond to this risk, the department implemented a number of measures including:

  • the creation of a Transformation Office and the development of a change management work plan
  • ongoing staff engagement sessions where updates on transformation efforts were provided and issues discussed
  • regular communications from the Deputy Minister on change activities
  • collaboration with the Major Project Management Office, Shared Services Canada and Public Services an Procurement Canada to actively address transition issues

This risk did not materialize due to the mitigation measures that were put in place.

In our commitment to evidence-based policymaking, the department continued to strengthen its demographic and socio-economic research and analytical capacity. Important investments continue to be made both in the collection and dissemination of Indigenous survey data, including the Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the First Nations Labour and Employment Development Survey. As part of these efforts, the department also continued to work with partners such as the First Nations Information Governance Center, Statistics Canada, and academia to better understand socio-economic gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. The department developed a new series for the Community Well-being Index (1981-2016), which was subsequently published in May 2019. The department continues to update other measurement tools and research products, including the Community Remoteness and Environmental Indices, and Indigenous demographic projections. The department's public statistical enquiries service (INSTAT) that provides authoritative socio-economic and demographic information, responded to over 1000 detailed requests for data, 50% external to the department.

The update of the Departmental Results Framework was initiated in 2018–19 and will be finalized in 2019–20 following the coming into force of the legislation creating the new department (July 2019). The updated Framework will better reflect CIRNAC's longer-term mandate and vision.

2. Communications Services

In 2018–19, the Communications team le multiple transformation communications related to the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the creation of CIRNAC and ISC.

A new CIRNAC website was created; content was migrated and updated from the previous INAC website. Using social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, the team supported the Government of Canada engagement with Indigenous peoples and all Canadians in support of reconciliation.

CIRNAC also coordinated a variety of public events and the organization of Indigenous cultural awareness events, including #IndigenousReads.

3. Human Resources Management Services

CIRNAC concentrated its efforts to finalize the department's Workplace Well-Being and Mental Health Strategy, which was officially released in June 2018.

  • The Strategy outlines numerous actions to help achieve CIRNAC's goals related to workplace wellness.
  • Furthermore, CIRNAC worked closely with a new Centre for Abilities Management and Workplace Wellness on the Workplace Wellbeing and Mental Health strategies. This Centre has taken the lead on the implementation of the Accessible Canada Act (Bill C-81), as well as the implementation of the Public Service Accessibility Strategy.

With regards to Indigenous recruitment, leadership development, and retention, the Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative continued to be delivered under the umbrella of the Deputy Minister's Aboriginal Workforce Initiative II. This initiative succeeded in launching Cohort 5, with 21 participants from 12 government departments including ISC and CIRNAC.

The Aspiring Indigenous Managers Development Initiative (AIMDI) Framework was presented in spring 2017. In 2018–19, consultations for interests and support were done with internal and external stakeholders. Further analysis is required regarding feasibility.

Since implementing a new approach to addressing issues related to the implementation of the Phoenix Pay System and adding resources to the pay function, the department has demonstrated improvements and was in the top 10 federal departments in terms of reducing their backlog. Through collaborative work with the Pay Centre and different HR-to-Pay initiatives, there has been a decrease in the number of pay issues. At the end of fiscal year 2017–18 there were about 19,000 pay issues in arrears, by the end of 2018–19 there were about 14,000 cases, an improvement of 26% in 1 year. CIRNAC continues to offer support to ISC for pay-related issues and adopted the Pay Pod model in May 2019. This initiative is part of the Government of Canada's commitment to supporting employees and resolving public service pay issues as quickly as possible.

4. Financial Management Services

In 2018–19, the department successfully delivered the integrated financial systems for the 2019–20 fiscal year, revised business processes, budget management regimes and reporting processes to enable the transition of people, services, financial information and integrated systems required to ensure payments to Indigenous recipients were processed.

5. Information Management and Information Technology Services

The Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) services supported CIRNAC in planning, designing and implementing IM/IT solutions required to support both departments and implementing Government of Canada IM/IT projects, standards, direction and strategies. At the same time, existing systems were maintained to support business continuity.

6. Real Property, Materiel, and Acquisition Services

In 2018–19, the department continued the implementation of its Real Property Management Action Plan to address urgent health and safety risks identified through various studies and to minimize/manage departmental liability with respect to its off-reserve custodial real property portfolio. Significant progress was made in a number of areas, including demolition projects, asset-specific strategic planning, internal/external stakeholder consultation and divestiture planning. Implementation of recommendation of various studies along with divestiture planning will continue in the coming year in consultation with internal and external stakeholders to address ownership and other sensitive issues. To advance the department's procurement agenda, during 2018–19 the focus was on transition and included the transfer of contracts formerly with INAC to the new departmental structure under CIRNAC. In addition, significant progress was made in aligning policies and procedures across the CIRNAC business models.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
204,678,749 204,678,749 279,733,517 235,202,221 30,523,472
The difference ($30.5 million) between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through the Operational Budget Carry Forward and internal reallocation of resources to address funding pressures in: Information Technology, Legal Services (billings from the Department of Justice for work on litigation files), Management and Oversight, Financial Management, and Material Management.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19 Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
1,231 1,304 73

The increase FTEs is mainly due to the transformation, Phoenix Response Team and MyGCHR system.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Spending Trend
Departmental spending trend

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Spending Trend
Millions of $ Actual Spending Planned Spending
2016–17 2017–18* 2018-19 2019–20 2020–21 2021-22
Total 9,133 8,029 158 6,044 3,326 3,172
Statutory 168 158 109 96 61 44
Voted 8,965 7,871 4,322 5,948 3,265 3,128

* Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to the Orders in Council, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations Sectors were transferred to ISC. Therefore, the actual expenditures for these programs (for the period of November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018) are not included in the above numbers.

For the period 2016–17 to 2018–19

CIRNAC's actual spending for 2018–19 was $4.4 billion, a net decrease of approximately $4.7 billion over a 3-year period from 2016–17. This is due to in large part to:

  • The transfer of the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations Sectors to ISC as of November 30, 2017 pursuant to Orders in Council (-$6,365.4 million)
  • The winding down of Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (-$111.5 million)
  • Net increase in spending for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (+$37.9 million)
  • Funding for the Métis Nation Housing Strategy and Métis Nation Heritage Centre (+$48.4 million)
  • Funding to support the New Fiscal Relationship: Collaboration with Self-Governing Indigenous Governments (+$48.8 million)
  • Funding for the implementation of Anishinabek Nation Education Agreement (+$50.0 million)
  • Funding for the Recognition of Rights and Self-Determination Tables and the Negotiation Support Funding Program (+$75.8 million)
  • Funding to support the implementation of a renewed relationship with the Manitoba Métis Federation (+$129.5 million)
  • Funding for the Sixties Scoop settlement (+$136.6 million)
  • An increase in spending for specific claims settlements (+$381.4 million)
  • An increase in spending for special claims settlements (+$769.0 million)

For the period 2018–19 to 2021–22

For the period 2018–19 to 2021–22, spending is expected to decrease from $4.4 billion in 2018–19 to $3.2 billion in 2021–22. The decrease of $1.3 billion can be explained in 2 parts.

Spending is expected to increase from $4.4 billion in 2018–19 to $6.0 billion in 2019–20. The increase of $1.6 billion primarily reflects an increase in funding for the settlement of Childhood Claims and the Sixties Scoop settlement offset by the decrease in spending related to the specific claims settlements and the special claims settlements.

For the period 2019–20 to 2021–22, spending is expected to decrease from $6.0 billion in 2019–20 to $3.2 billion in 2021–22. This decrease of $2.9 billion is in large part due to:

  • change in the approved funding profile for the settlement of Childhood Claims as per the projected timing of payment (-$873.2 million)
  • the sunset of funding of the Sixties Scoop settlement as payments are expected to be completed in 2019–20 (-$750.0 million)
  • the decrease in approved funding level related to the specific claims settlements (-$644.9 million); the replenishment of specific claims funding was announced in the recent Budget and not yet reflected in the figures above; planned spending will be adjusted once funding approval is received
  • the sunset of funding for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (-$177.7 million)
  • the sunset of funding for infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (-$141.0 million)

The planned spending figures above reflect the current approved funding level for the department and these figures will be adjusted as new funding is approved. Decisions on the renewal of the sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future estimates.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–181 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–171
Actual spending (authorities used)
Rights and Self-Determination 2,232,915,663 2,232,915,663 5,144,130,833 2,605,481,322 3,976,092,844 3,384,512,145 2,974,204,869 1,807,260,470
Community and Regional Development 646,610,036 646,610,036 695,066,509 519,888,697 872,717,952 811,942,939 818,093,579 673,420,254
Amount not allocated to core responsibilities2 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 3,951,757,345 6,365,446,681
Subtotal 2,879,525,699 2,879,525,699 5,839,197,342 3,125,370,019 4,848,810,796 4,196,455,084 7,744,055,793 8,846,127,405
Internal Services 204,678,749 204,678,749 204,767,708 200,885,534 279,733,517 235,202,221 285,366,302 286,377,646
Total 3,084,204,448 3,084,204,448 6,043,965,050 3,326,255,553 5,128,544,313 4,431,657,305 8,029,422,095 9,132,505,051

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
1 2016–17 and 2017–18 actual spending has been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the Departmental Results Framework.
2 Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to Orders in Council, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors were transferred to ISC. Therefore, the actual expenditures for these programs are not included in the Departmental Results Framework for CIRNAC under the following core responsibilities: Rights and Self-Determination, and Community and Regional Development.

The $2.0 billion difference between planned spending of $3.1 billion and total authorities available for use of $5.1 billion in 2018–19 primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and Budget Implementation Vote for the following major items:

The $0.7 billion difference between total authorities available for use of $5.1 billion and actual spending of $4.4 billion in 2018–19 primarily reflects the deferral of funds to future years, such as:

Funds for these initiatives were not required in 2018–19 and have been re-profiled to future years when they will be available for the intended purposes.

2018–19 Budgetary actual gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
Actual gross spending
2018–19
Actual gross spending for specified purpose accounts
2018–19
Actual revenues netted against expenditures
2018–19
Actual net spending (authorities used)
Rights and Self-Determination 3,384,512,145 0 0 3,384,512,145
Community and Regional Development 811,942,939 0 0 811,942,939
Subtotal 4,196,455,084 0 0 4,196,455,084
Internal Services 236,531,253 0 (1,329,032) 235,202,221
Total 4,432,986,337 0 (1,329,032) 4,431,657,305
Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (Full-Time Equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents1
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents1
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
Rights and Self-Determination 1,181 1,149 1,021 1,119 1,101 967
Community and Regional Development 822 1,400 856 864 884 755
Amount not allocated to core responsibilities2 1,164 326 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal 3,167 2,875 1,877 1,983 1,985 1,722
Internal Services 1,476 1,434 1,231 1,304 1,213 1,201
Total 4,643 4,309 3,108 3,287 3,198 2,923
1 2016–17 and 2017–18 actual full-time equivalents have been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the Departmental Results Framework.
2 Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to the Orders in Council, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors were transferred to ISC. Therefore, the actual full-time equivalents and forecast full-time equivalents for these programs are not included in the Departmental Results Framework for CIRNAC under the following core responsibilities: Rights and Self-Determination, and Community and Regional Development.

Expenditures by vote

For information on CIRNAC's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–19.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of CIRNAC's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

CIRNAC's financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information* 2018–19 Planned results** 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18
Actual results
Difference
(2018–19 Actual results minus 2018–19 Planned results)
Difference
(2018–2019 Actual results minus 2017–18 Actual results
Total Expenses 4,691,084,592 7,166,767,746 13,660,622,348 2,475,683,154 (6,493,854,602)
Total Revenues 3,643,381 2,450,550 3,620,773 (1,192,831) (1,170,223)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 4,687,441,211 7,164,317,196 13,657,001,575 2,476,875,985 (6,492,684,379)
*Totals may not match financial statements due to rounding.
**Please refer to the Future-Oriented Statement of Operations on CIRNAC's website.

Expenses by Type

Total expenses were $7,167 million in 2018–19, representing a 48% decrease from the previous year's expenses of $13,661 million (this includes $3,936 million that was transferred to ISC on November 30, 2017). Transfer payments related to Indigenous peoples and to claims and litigations amounted to $4,749 million or 66% of total expenses. Other significant operating expenses included contingent liabilities adjustments of $1,085 million (15%) and environmental liabilities adjustments totaling $425 million (6%).

Revenues by Type

Total revenues for 2018–19 amounted to $2.5 million, representing a 32% decrease over the previous year's total revenues of $3.6 million. Revenues included resources royalties, interest on loans, finance and administrative services, leases and rentals and miscellaneous revenues.

Significant changes

The $6,493 million decrease in expenditures is due in large part to the $3,936 million transfer of the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional operations branches to ISC. The remaining change in expenses is due to a decrease in the provision for claims and litigation of $3,458 million due to decreases in estimated settlement amounts.

The change in total revenues is mainly attributed to a decrease of $1 million in financial and administrative services.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information* 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 minus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities 27,684,816,551 24,915,856,971 2,768,959,580
Total net financial assets 665,663,661 595,669,324 69,994,337
Departmental net debt 27,019,152,890 24,320,187,647 2,698,965,243
Total non-financial assets 228,479,796 219,461,798 9,017,998
Departmental net financial position (26,790,673,094) (24,100,725,848) (2,689,947,246)

Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $27,685 million at the end of 2018–19, which is an increase of $2,769 million (11%) from the previous year's total net liabilities of $24,916 million. The provision for claims and litigation represents the largest portion of liabilities at $22,397 million (81%) of total liabilities. Other significant liabilities include environmental liabilities of $3,749 million (14%) and accounts payable of $1,413 million (5%).

Net Financial Assets by Type

Total net financial assets at the end of 2018–19 were $666 million, which represents an increase of $70 million (12%) from the previous year's total net financial assets of $596 million. Of the total net assets, the asset due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund accounted for $645 million (97%) and accounts receivable and advances accounted for $20 million (3%).

Non-Financial Assets by Type

Total non-financial assets were $228 million at the end of 2018–19, which represents an increase of $9 million (4%) from the previous year's total non-financial assets of $219 million. Tangible capital assets represent $184 million (80%) of total non-financial assets while land held for future claims settlements represents $44 million (19%).

Significant changes

The change in total liabilities is primarily due to an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $831 million and an increase of contingent liabilities of $1,561 million.

The change in total net financial assets is due to an increase of $67 million in the assets of due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

The information below reflects the organization as of March 31, 2019.

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett and the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc

Ministerial portfolio: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Enabling instrument: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C.1985, c.I-6

Date of establishment: 1880

Other: None

Special operating agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Administrative tribunals and agencies:

  • Polar Knowledge Canada

Adjudicative and advisory bodies:

  • Specific Claims Tribunal
  • National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être:

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) supports Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • Improve social well-being and economic prosperity
  • Develop healthier, more sustainable communities
  • Participate more fully in Canadaʼs political, social and economic development – to the benefit of all Canadians

The Minister of CIRNAC is responsible for this organization.

Note: As of March 31, 2019, the legal name of the department for Appropriation Acts was the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. In July 2019, legislation establishing the new departments, CIRNAC and ISC, came into effect.

Mandate and role:

Mandate and role are available on CIRNAC's website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on CIRNAC's website.

Reporting framework

The CIRNAC Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

Core Responsibility: Rights and Self-Determination
Support Indigenous and northern organizations, individuals, communities and governments in controlling and managing their own affairs and interests based on the recognition and honouring of rights, respect, collaboration and partnerships. Activities include: governance capacity and community planning, negotiating and implementing treaties, self-government agreements and specific claims; addressing historic grievances; consulting and engaging on issues of importance to Indigenous peoples and Northerners as well as registration, estates, trust moneys administration and implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
Departmental results Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development
  • % of First Nations adopting alternatives to the Indian Act
  • Number of communities where Indigenous rights and self-determination processes are underway
  • Number of communities where Indigenous rights and self-determination agreements have been concluded
  • % of First Nations that exercise options to collect, manage and/or access revenues held in trust
  • % of Arctic Council initiatives that correlate to or advance Canadian Indigenous Permanent Participants' priorities
Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance

Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements

Specific Claims

Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

Consultation and Accommodation

Consultation and Policy Development

Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program

Basic Organizational Capacity

Other Claims

First Nation Jurisdiction over Land and Economic Development

Northern and Arctic Governance and Partnerships

Individual Affairs

Residential Schools Resolution
Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions
  • % of First Nation communities with Financial Management System Certification through the First Nations Financial Management Board
  • % of First Nation communities with land governance regimes established
  • % of First Nation communities with real property taxation regimes supported through the First Nations Tax Commission
  • Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut
Past injustices are recognized and resolved
  • The annual percentage of specific claims accepted for negotiation that are resolved by means of a negotiated settlement agreement
  • Hectares of land added to the reserve land base to fulfill legal obligations
  • % of Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement claims completed through the Independent Assessment Process
  • Number of litigation claims concluded
Core Responsibility: Community and Regional Development
Support the efforts of Indigenous and northern communities in sustainable economic development, sustainable food, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: investment in Indigenous and northern entrepreneurs and businesses; land management and resource development; clean energy development and climate change adaptation; remediation of contaminated sites; and protection of the Arctic ecosystems and advancement of northern (Arctic) science and technology.
Departmental results Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth
  • % of First Nation communities where non-government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues
  • Number of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded
  • % growth of federal procurement contracts set aside for Indigenous businesses
Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development

Economic Development Capacity and Readiness

Land, Natural Resources and Environmental Management

Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy

Northern Strategic and Science Policy

Northern Regulatory and Legislative Frameworks

Northern and Arctic Environmental Sustainability

Northern Contaminated Sites

Canadian High Arctic Research Station

Nutrition North
Indigenous and northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments
  • % of Climate Change Impact Assessments that identify adaptation measures
  • The annual growth rate of food prices in isolated northern communities compared to the national growth rate
Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed
  • % of contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health and safety where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk
  • % of contaminated sites in the North that pose imminent danger to public health and safety and the environment that are being actively managed
  • % of First Nations with land use plans
  • % of First Nation communities with certified land managers
  • % of First Nations, Inuit and northern communities that are dependent on diesel
  • % of First Nations, Inuit and northern communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on diesel
  • % of First Nation communities with adequate solid waste management systems

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for CIRNAC's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on CIRNAC's website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Internet: https://www.canada.ca/en/crown-indigenous-relations-northern-affairs.html
Email: aadnc.webmestre-webmaster.aandc@canada.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Departmental library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: aadnc.reference.aandc@canada.ca

Media inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-934-2302
Email: RCAANC.media.CIRNAC@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in 1 or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where 2 or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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