Exploring new ways of working together

Canada is moving forward with Indigenous partners on different paths toward reconciliation, including Recognition of Rights discussion tables. Find a list of these tables by region.

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About Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination discussion tables

The Government of Canada is working with Indigenous communities at about 60 discussion tables across the country to explore new ways of working together to advance the recognition of Indigenous rights and self-determination. These discussions represent more than 320 Indigenous communities, with a total population of more than 700,000 people.

The goal is to bring greater flexibility to negotiations based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. At these tables, Canada and Indigenous groups can explore new ideas and ways to reach agreements that will recognize the rights of Indigenous groups and advance their vision of self-determination for the benefit of their communities and all Canadians.

These discussions are community-driven and respond to the unique rights, needs and interests of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis groups where existing federal policies have not been able to do so. This may involve:

The priorities identified by Indigenous groups are the starting point for these discussions. Discussions can focus on one priority area or cover many issues.

The process for moving forward is jointly designed by the parties through co-developed agreements (such as Letters of Understanding, Memoranda of Understanding and Framework Agreements).

Under the agreed-upon process, the parties then work to find the common ground for moving ahead in partnership toward a shared and balanced solution.

These discussions can also seek to address longstanding issues that are not covered by existing treaty or self-government negotiations.This kind of dialogue is open to all Indigenous groups with Section 35 rights to address longstanding issues that may fall outside the scope of other federal policies.

Canada recognizes that federal policies and approaches will continue to evolve over time and looks forward to working with Indigenous communities to co-develop agreements that work for and benefit the parties.

Discussion tables by region

Indigenous communities currently engaged at a Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination discussion table with Canada include those listed below. Discussions are confidential. Key facts and links are provided for discussion tables that have been jointly announced or made public by the parties.

British Columbia

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council

Coastal First Nations
Participating Indigenous communities Seven Coastal First Nations (as represented by the Great Bear Initiative Society): Gitga'at First Nation, Gitxaala Nation, Heiltsuk First Nation, Kitasoo First Nation, Metlakatla First Nation, Nuxalk Nation, and Wuikinuxv Nation
When discussions began 2015
Key milestones On October 11, 2017, the parties signed a Framework Agreement for Fisheries Resources.
Related links Canada and the Coastal First Nations take a step forward in the management of fisheries resources for the central coast of British Columbia

Council of Haida Nation

Esquimalt

Heiltsuk Nation
Participating Indigenous communities Heiltsuk Nation
When discussions began 2016
Key milestones On January 28, 2017, the parties signed a Framework Agreement for Reconciliation.
Related links Reconciliation in Action: Minister Bennett and Chief Slett sign the Heiltsuk Hai´¿ci´stut Framework Agreement for Reconciliation

Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council

Métis Nation of British Columbia

Musqueam Indian Band

Namgis First Nation

Okanagan Nation Alliance

shíshàlh Nation (formely the Sechelt Indian Band)

Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance

Shuswap Nation Tribal Council

T'aaq-wiihak First Nations

Taku River Tlingit First Nation

Tsartlip First Nation

Tsilhqot'in Nation
Participating Indigenous communities Tsilhqot'in Nation comprises six communities: Tl'etinqox (Anaham), Tsi Del Del (Alexis Creek/Redstone), Yunesit'in Government (Stone), ?Esdilagh (Alexandria), Xeni Gwet'in First Nations Government (Nemiah) and the Tl'esqox (Toosey Band)
When talks began 2016
Key milestones On January 27, 2017, the parties signed a Letter of Understanding to renew relationships and advance reconciliation.
Related links Tsilhqot'in and Canada take first steps towards reconciliation with signing of Letter of Understanding
Tsleil-Waututh Nation
Participating Indigenous communities Tsleil-Waututh Nation
When talks began 2016
Key milestones On September 4, 2017, the parties signed a Letter of Understanding to renew relationships and advance reconciliation.
Related links Canada and Tsleil-Waututh Nation take steps to advance reconciliation with signing of Letter of Understanding

Wet’suwet’en Nation

Alberta

Blood Tribe

Métis Nation of Alberta
Participating Indigenous communities Métis Nation of Alberta
When talks began 2016
Key milestones

On November 16, 2017, the parties signed a Framework Agreement that sets out a process to begin formal negotiations.

The Framework Agreement is the result of exploratory talks held under a Memorandum of Understanding on Advancing Reconciliation signed in January 2017.

Related links

Métis Nation of Alberta

Canada and the Métis Nation of Alberta advance reconciliation with signing of Framework Agreement

Métis Settlements General Council
Participating Indigenous communities Métis Settlements General Council
When talks began 2017
Key milestones

On December 14, 2017, the parties signed a Memorandum of Understanding.

Related links Canada and the Métis Settlements General Council moving forward on reconciliation with signing of Memorandum of Understanding

Mikisew Cree First Nation

Treaty #6 First Nations

Treaty #8 First Nations

Saskatchewan

Métis Nation – Saskatchewan
Participating Indigenous communities Métis Nation of Saskatchewan
When talks began 2017
Key milestones On February 22, 2018, the parties signed a Memorandum of Understanding.
Ocean Man, White Bear and Pheasant Rump Nakota First Nations
Participating Indigenous communities Ocean Man, White Bear and Pheasant Rump Nakota First Nations
When talks began 2016
Key milestones On May 30, 2017, the parties signed a Memorandum of Understanding.

Poundmaker

Treaty #4

Whitecap Dakota First Nation
Participating Indigenous communities Whitecap Dakota First Nation
When talks began 2016
Key milestones On January 22, 2018, the parties signed a Framework Agreement for advancing reconciliation.
Related links Whitecap Dakota First Nation and Canada sign historic Framework Agreement towards treaty

Manitoba

Fish River Cree Nation

Island Lake Tribal Council

Manitoba Métis Federation
Participating Indigenous communities Manitoba Métis Federation
When talks began 2016
Key milestones

On November 15, 2016, the parties signed a Framework Agreement that sets out a process to begin formal negotiations.

The Framework Agreement is the result of exploratory talks held under a Memorandum of Understanding signed in May 2016.

Related links

Canada and Manitoba Métis Federation celebrate key milestone on road to reconciliation

Manitoba Métis Federation

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation

Treaty #2

Treaty #5 and Treaty #5 Adhesions First Nations

Ontario

Biigetikong Nishnaabeg, Pic Mobert First Nation, Pawgwasheeng, Long Lake No. 58 First Nation, Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek and Biinjitiwaabik Zaaging Anishinaabek

Métis Nation of Ontario
Participating Indigenous communities Métis Nation of Ontario
When talks began 2016
Key milestones On December 11, 2017, the three parties signed a Framework Agreement for Advancing Reconciliation.

On December 11, 2017, Canada and the Métis Nation of Ontario also signed an Agreement on Advancing Reconciliation with the Northwestern Ontario Métis Community.

On February 3, 2017, Canada and Métis Nation of Ontario signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Advancing Reconciliation. This led to exploratory discussions in which Ontario was invited to participate.
Related links Canada, Ontario and the Métis Nation of Ontario sign Framework Agreement for Advancing Reconciliation

Canada and the Métis Nation of Ontario sign Agreement on Advancing Reconciliation with Métis Community in Northwestern Ontario

Métis Nation of Ontario

Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation

Nishnawbe Aski Nation

Oneida Nation of the Thames

Robinson-Huron Treaty First Nations

United Chiefs and Councils of Mnidoo Mnising

Williams Treaties First Nations
Participating Indigenous communities Williams Treaties First Nations: Alderville First Nation, Beausoleil First Nation, Chippewas of Georgina Island, Chippewas of Rama, Curve Lake First Nation, Hiawatha First Nation, Mississaugas of Scugog Island
When talks began 2016
Key milestones In February 2017, the parties agreed to a process to begin formal negotiations.
Related links Canada, Ontario and Williams Treaties First Nations take first step towards a negotiated resolution of Alderville litigation

Quebec

Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw

Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg

Mi’kmaq of the Gaspé region of Quebec

Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke

Atlantic

Maliseet of New Brunswick/Wolastoqey

Maliseet of Viger

Mi'kmaq of New Brunswick

Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia

Mi'kmaq of Prince Edward Island

Peskotomuhkati

Nunavut

Ahiarmiut (Ennadai Lake Society)

Northwest Territories

Kátł’odeeche First Nation

Yukon

Kwanlin Dun First Nation

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